Christ In Us: The Hope of Glory

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The following devotion comes from my email subscription to

Connection! Devotions for Every Day Life“.

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The Hope of Glory

“Christ in us, the hope of glory” (Colossians 1:27).

We believe that Jesus is present when we gather as the Church. But we don’t act that way. That is not the way things happen on Sunday. You know why I know your church needs revival? The reason I know your church needs revival is when church services ended last Sunday, you went home. What would happen if Jesus was there? Let’s just suppose Jesus was there. Would you be looking at your watch? Would you be eager to leave?

One of the characteristics of the great revivals was extended times of worship. They never wanted to end the service. Now obviously people had to leave, they had to take care of physical things, they had jobs that they had to go to, but as soon as they were done they were back, because that was where God was. They wanted to be in on the action. They wanted to be where God was. They wanted to experience His presence.

I want to suggest to you that revival is not strange or mystical. It is simply the Church waking up to the presence of Christ in her midst. It is almost as though God reaches out and slaps us and we wake up and we realize God is there. That is what revival is. It is God shaking us. It is God waking us up. And we recognize that Jesus really is here.

Father, I long to experience Your Presence, to be where You are, and to fully know You. Deepen my desire to be still before You and to listen to Your voice so that You might speak Your truth to my heart. Wake me up to the knowledge of Jesus living in me!

–Taken from the article Praying for Revival by Dave Butts. Read more…

Prayer Points

Praise God for the mystery of the Trinity—a model of love, unity, and oneness. Give thanks that God is able to bring a spirit of oneness among you and other believers, “so that with one heart and mouth you may glorify the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Rom. 15:5-6). Confess any comments, thoughts, or actions that may have led to division, rather than unity, between you and another Christian. Ask God to make you humble enough to see your own fault in strained relationships and to seek forgiveness and peace.

Ask God to put his special protection around the staff and leaders of your church, so that Satan will not be able to bring division through misunderstanding, pride, or self-interest (Phil. 2:1-3).

–Prayer Points taken from Patterns for Prayer by Alvin VanderGriend (Click on the blue title for more information about this resource).

Posted 17 Sept 2011

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This is a powerful devotional thought, and it challenges all of us I’m sure.  We live our lives at such a rapid pace, running from event to event and trying to juggle all the myriad of responsibilities and decisions that we must face each day.  And yet where is God in all of this?  It’s true that Jesus wanted us to really experience life, but is this the life He was talking about?

Perhaps we need some direct, external challenge to our faith, maybe even some persecution in our life for us to wake up and value our faith and to be more vigilant in prayer.  We have heard over the last 60 years how the faithful Christians in China have been persecuted and killed.  And yet at the same time, we hear reports of the phenomenal growth of the Church in China, perhaps the greatest evangelistic explosion of all time.

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How about another example of how persecution produced fervent prayer-mobilized Christians.  What I am thinking of is the Moravian Movement.  In the mid 1500’s, some early Protestant Pietists fled persecution in lower Europe and by the early 1700’s ended up being sheltered by a nobleman named Count Ludwig von Zinzendorf.  Under his protection and inspiration, the small community of believers became passionate in prayer to God, and this led to an evangelistic zeal that sent missionaries around the world.

In fact, the prayer movement that began in earnest in 1727 at their center was to be held unbroken by members of their movement for over 100 years.  The first overseas missionaries were sent to the Caribbean in 1732, and within fifteen more years, they had sent evangelists to countries as far away as China and Persia.  One source states that in 150 years from the start of their prayer revival,  over 2,150 missionaries were sent world-wide for the cause of Christ.

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Wouldn’t that be something if we saw this kind of revival again?  And yet, even as I ask this question, it makes it sound like those “good old days” will never come back again.  The real truth is that there are plenty of signs that there is a renewed sense of an awakening to fervent prayer, here in the United States, and also in many of the developing countries where Christianity is flourishing quite well.

And as I mentioned in a previous article (Giant Step For Bible Translation), Pioneer Bible Translators is going through a growth spurt that is nothing short of a miracle.  In five years we have grown from being a mission with 182 missionaries to 322 members.  We expect to be doubled (380+) by next year, and then doubled again to about 800 missionaries in the next following six years.

And what has made the difference?  Prayer.  No doubt about it.  And Scripture promises to us, that when two or three are gathered in His name, that He is there in their midst.  So just imagine how powerful the Spirit can move when the 400 missionaries and supporting Christians who stand behind PBT keep up the current prayer focus.  WOW!!  Watch out world – Christ is on the move.

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Walk Worthy of Christ (Phil. 1:27-30)

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Being a Christian in Papua New Guinea

Philippians 1:27-30  Whatever happens, conduct yourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ. Then, whether I come and see you or only hear about you in my absence, I will know that you stand firm in the one Spirit, striving together as one for the faith of the gospel without being frightened in any way by those who oppose you. This is a sign to them that they will be destroyed, but that you will be saved—and that by God.  For it has been granted to you on behalf of Christ not only to believe in him, but also to suffer for him, since you are going through the same struggle you saw I had, and now hear that I still have.

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In chapter one of Philippians, it is quite clear to us and to those to whom Paul wrote this letter that he was truly suffering for the Lord.  He was put in prison, simply because he preached the Good News about Jesus.  He never knew from day to day whether he might live one more day or be executed for his faith.

There were others who were trying to get the attention of people.  In so doing, they were stirring up trouble, and doing it deliberately to try to cause grief for Paul because of their envy over the fame and success that Paul had when he had been free and preached Christ.  But from every perspective, Paul believed that all these things were happening to ultimately bring people to Christ, and that Christ would in the end be glorified.

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What a tremendous example Paul set for the Christians of the first century.  He also wrote down very clearly how he expected Christians to live and work out their faith in the real world.  It was too early for him to know if he in fact would be released from his jail, or executed.  And so he hoped to come see the Philippians in person, but if not, he had the highest expectation that he would hear good reports about their unity of their faith.

There are two Greek phrases here in verse 27 which show us just how seriously Paul viewed how Christians’ ought to behalf themselves.  First of all, he tells the Philippian believers to “conduct yourselves in a manner worthy of the gospel of Christ.”  This carries the idea of “acting like a good citizen”.  We know that part of the Good News is to announce the rule of God in heaven and on earth, so as good citizens of Heaven, our behavior is to matched the very nature of God himself.

The second idea is that believers should stand firm, shoulder to shoulder, and wrestle with and fight against those who would stand as enemies opposed to the truthfulness and internal unity of the message of Christ as it is contained in the Bible.  Paul promises that those who will make this stand will also experience suffering for the sake of the Gospel, just as Paul often had, and still did in their time, as he sat in that dinghy, dirty, awful dungeon.

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One of the most difficult things that I have had to do in my life was to go to our village in Papua New Guinea where we were actively involved in a Bible translation project and tell them our family would probably not be returning to the village.  Our son had just been diagnosed with cancer and was in the Brisbane hospital.  Jill and our other son were down there too.  And now I was coming to close out our house in the village.

Nine years later, our son is doing okay, and Jill and I are still involved in Bible translation projects.  But we have not been able to return once to the village in PNG.  At the time we ministered there, the only church in the area was the Catholic church.  They tried to hold meaningful services, but the message of salvation was not preached, and for the most part, the Bible truths were shrouded in mystery.

I have agonized like Paul in some ways over these years.  I have wanted at times to be able to go back there and administer the Words of Truth to the people.  I had thought many times, “Where would the people be at spiritually if our family had been allowed to return there?”  But as I have gotten reports from some men of the villages, it would seem that God has another plan in mind, and now is in motion.

Praise God!  There has been an evangelistic breakthrough in the past two years.  People are giving their lives to the Lord, many are being baptized, and small churches have sprung up in almost all of the main villages.  Understandably, some strong opposition has arisen from those that have remained in the Catholic church.  The test of this revival, I think, is going to be how the new Christians will respond to this opposition.

And this is how the message in this passage of Philippians can speak to this moment.  I hear how this new group of believers are uniting together to stand firm in what they believe.  What I hope to hear is that they will “conduct themselves in a worthy manner”.  They will need to live like Kingdom citizens here and now, and love their Catholic friends and neighbors.

Like I said, it is difficult to be separated by distance and circumstances from the people that we ministered to for five years.  But like Paul, I pray for them as God reminds me, and I yearn to hear of good reports of what God is doing among them, and that they are living for God.  Won’t you pray with me for them as well.  And may God be glorified among them.

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