Adventure On My Way To Papua New Guinea

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PNG, Here I Come!

So….  The taxi came right on time and I got to the airport by about 8:40.  I went to the self-help machine and everything seemed to be going smoothly, my passport scanned nicely, and I got my Boarding Pass and luggage tag printed out.  Then I looked at the Boarding Pass and it said that boarding would start at 4:20 p.m  YIKES!!!  Did I get my information mixed up??

So I quickly went over to the ticket counter and got the attention of an Agent.  I asked, “What happened to my ticket?  I sure hope this printed wrong!”

“Oh,” he says.  “Yes, there is a mechanical problem with the plane and it will be about 6 hours before we get a replacement plane flown in.”  YIKES AGAIN!!

So as calmly as I could, although my bass voice may have been closer to soprano… 🙂  I explained that I had five flights to catch over the next 65 hours and I really couldn’t afford to get bumped off schedule on the first flight.

“Oh,” he says.  “Well, there is a plane going to Los Angeles right now.  In fact, if I hurry up here, I have two minutes to get you rebooked before we get locked out and I can’t process any more passengers.”

    

So I said, “Oh, ok.  Sounds good.  Can you do that?”  (Meanwhile, prayers are fervently going up to the One who is really in charge.)

So there we were, trying to beat the clock and not get locked out.  And without even breaking a sweat, and smiling the whole time, he did it.  I was in the system.  Of course there was no time to ask for wheelchair assistance.  And so off we went at a trot, the agent with a limp (he looked about 65 years old) pushing the cart to get me through Customs, and me hobbling/bouncing along on my two arm crutches.

The Agent was not able to go any further than the last security scan station, so I hoisted my laptop strap up over one shoulder, and my carry-on duffle strap over the other shoulder.  And you can guess where the Gate was for my plane.  Yup, it was number 25, the very last one on the concourse wing.  🙂  I got there, checked in to make sure I was still in the system, confirmed that, sat down in a nearby wheelchair, and off we went to get me boarded on the plane.

And so started my first leg of my three day journey to Papua New Guinea.

    

It was kind of unfortunate that we didn’t have another 60 seconds at the check-in counter at Calgary, as I might have been able to ask Air Canada to tag my big suitcase all the way to Brisbane.  But I figured that God would help get me and all my luggage from Terminal 2 to Terminal 7 in Los Angeles.  No problem!  After all, He got me on to that ready-to-fly plane in Calgary.

Now the young man who was my wheelchair attendant at LA was not so positively inclined as I was.  Actually, he had trouble figuring out how to push me with one hand and pull my suitcase with the other hand.  We managed to go down, up and out of the Terminal without too much difficulty.  And guess what vehicle was just pulling up to the curb as we got out the door.  Yup!  It was the Handi-Van Shuttle bus.  I knew they have some here in LA, but you usually have to wait about 20 minutes.  But it was not this day!  😀

And off I went around the horseshoe airport and over to Terminal 7.  The woman driver was so helpful.  She even turned off the vehicle, and helped me get my luggage all the way in to the ticket counter area.  But she felt bad that I was there so early (being 12 Noon) and my next flight to Sydney wasn’t until 10 p.m.  She told me I’d have to wait in this chair for a few hours until they could help check me in.

But by now, I’m thinking, “Hey, this day is going pretty good.  I think I’ll see if I can be blessed again with a nice surprise.”

So I walked over to a nearby United Agent and asked when early check in would begin.  “Well,” she said, “you can start checking in 10 hours before flight time.”  So guess what time it is?  Yup!  It’s 12:10, and I can go check in now.  Yippee!!  🙂

    

Checking in went real smooth.  I got my suitcase tagged all the way to Brisbane, via Sydney.  He then told me to go take a seat and a wheel chair person would come for me at some point.  So I figured, “I’ve got some time until they come.  I think I’ll have a little Yoghurt.”  And guess what?  By the time I had found the yoghurt, my spoon, and sat down, I looked up and “Presto” there was the wheelchair person.  Gulp, gulp, gulp.  That is definitely the fastest I’ve ever eaten yoghurt, and not regretted it later.  😉

And zooommm!!  We were through Security and on to the other side.  She asked me what my gate number was, but it didn’t even have it printed on the Boarding Pass, because I was so early and there was no way to know what gate the plane might actually arrive at.  But that’s okay.  I told the woman that I wanted to go sit in the “United Club Lounge” where it is comfortable, you can do email, and often get food and snacks there.

“Oh,” she says, “but you’re not a First Class passenger.  I don’t think they’ll let you in.”  And I’m thinking, “Hey, I’m on a roll here.  Let’s go ask them and find out.”

So we went over to the Lounge and I asked if I could buy a Day Pass, and he said, “Sure! Come right on in.”  Yippee!!

And so began my journey back to PNG where we learn to expect the unexpected.  But isn’t that where God shows up the best?  Especially for those who trust in Him.

    

God’s Word Comes To The Yalunka People

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Praise God for a Completed Translation of the Entire Bible

[Editor’s Note: Pioneer Bible Translators recently celebrated a significant milestone in our mission history.  PBT sent its first two missionary family over to Papua New Guinea back in 1976.  Thirty seven years later, the first completely translated Bible into the local people’s language occurred in West Africa among the Yalunka people group.  The story below comes from a woman who was there and made incredible observations throughout the Day of Dedication.  I know you will enjoy this story.]

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I was there as an observer. Up until this point, my closest tie to the Yalunka people was the many prayers I offered on their behalf and the numerous stories I heard about them from our president, Greg Pruett. Now I was privileged beyond words to witness these stories take on flesh before my very eyes as the Word of God came to life among them.

My eyes scanned the crowd of Yalunka men and women, hoping to absorb every snapshot of this historic moment – the dedication of the complete Bible in their language. It was actually the little things that stood out to me.

First there was the man who accepted the gift of a Bible with unbridled joy on his face. He didn’t glance up from the Word for the next 15 minutes or so, opening the book and immediately beginning to read. He then struck up conversations with those around him, pointing to the text and smiling. Although I couldn’t hear or understand his words, my heart sung with the realization, “He is Bible-less no more!”

Then there were the children, so curious about the many westerners who showed up for this momentous day. They were eager to hold my hands, have their picture taken and catch my attention with a smile. They are the first generation of Yalunka children to grow up with access to God’s Word in their language. As their parents become acquainted with and transformed by Scripture, so too, will they.

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I watched the Yalunka church leaders unload the boxes of Bibles in front of the crowd and set them down reverently on the table. They methodically passed them out to each group of visitors according to the size of the church in their area. Some men received one or two; others were given entire boxes of Bibles to take home with them.

At the conclusion of the ceremony, I choked up as these same men lifted the boxes to their shoulders and carried them off from the meeting place. I imagined the rejoicing of the saints waiting at home as the Bibles were delivered and could almost hear the sound of pages turning in church on Sunday as the pastor preached from the Yalunka Bible instead of the French.

I then observed one of our veteran missionaries open the Book, awe etched on the canvas of her face. I almost felt like an intruder on her private expression of praise for this long awaited day. She served for years as a literacy specialist among the Yalunka people, daily laboring to teach them to read so they could take ownership of the Scriptures once they were available. She placed her hand palm down on the pages of this Holy Book, closed her eyes and raised her head heavenward. The reverence in her countenance sang with mine, “They are Bible-less no more!”

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Finally, my eyes caught sight of a woman standing in the back of the crowd, pulling her ear and looking intently at the ground below. As she dropped down on all fours to look for her earring, I saw Scripture played out before me – the vision of another woman sweeping her entire house in search of a lost coin (Luke 15:8). In that moment, I heard the whispers of the Father, “I am searching for every lost Yalunka soul – every…single…one.”

As songs were sung in praise to God, as introductions of visitors from far away were made, as sermons were delivered and prayers prayed, my love and appreciation grew for the worldwide team who enabled this ministry among these beautiful people. We always describe the ministry of Pioneer Bible Translators as a team ministry, but the reality of this was never clearer to me than at that moment. God accomplished this work – our first completed Bible – through a team of missionaries, support personnel, donors and prayer warriors who each made sacrifices to see God’s Kingdom expand.

Together we look forward to the day when a great multitude from every nation, tribe, people and language will stand before the throne and before the Lamb (Rev. 7:9-10). On that day, none present will be mere observers, but full participants in the coming of His glory.

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Prayer Requests

  • The Yalunka people now have the complete Bible in their mother tongue. Pray that these recently dedicated Bibles will be widely used. Pray that lives will be transformed.
  • We serve among 11 other people groups in this region whose Bible translations are in various stages of completion. Pray that the continuing work of our missionaries and national translators will be fruitful.
  • 
Our West Africa team has a critical shortage of administrative personnel. Pray that the Lord of the harvest will send the right administrators and managers to serve here.

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* If this article has been helpful to you and a blessing, please share it and invite your friends to come visit this devotional blog site.

The Power Of Life Changing Scriptures

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Hebrews 4:12 says, “For the word of God is living and active. Sharper than any double-edged sword, it penetrates to dividing soul and spirit, joints and marrow; it judges the thoughts and attitudes of the heart.” (NIV)

[Editor’s Note: The Bible is powerful in touching and transforming lives. One example of this truth is found in the account given by William Butler, a longtime missionary with Pioneer Bible Translators in Papua New Guinea.]

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It had been a long week. Every day from early in the morning until late afternoon, and sometimes into the evenings, we’d been checking the translation of Mark’s Gospel into the Waran language. We wanted to see if the translation accurately and clearly transmitted God’s message.

One of the faithful members of the checking committee was Mindo. An older man and former village representative in the local government council, he was well-respected in the community. His knowledge of the language was immense and we welcomed him as a valuable part of the committee.

However, the week was difficult for Mindo. He wasn’t accustomed to sitting for such long periods of time. The constant mental strain of listening and evaluating every phrase was exhausting. Occasionally, Mindo nodded off in the heat of the afternoon. How much of the message of Christ’s words could be getting through to him?

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Then we came to Chapter 14 which details the arrest and subsequent mistreatment of Jesus. As the account of the arrest was read, Mindo perked up. As Jesus was led before the Council and liars came in to give testimony against Him, Mindo lowered his head and kept his eyes on the floor, a Waran posture which demonstrates embarrassment and shame.

When verse 65 was read, Mindo began to vocalize his feelings. Following each new humiliation heaped on Jesus, Mindo quietly responded with, “Oh, sorry, sorry.” With each report, his head sunk lower and his eyes bored more deeply into the floor.

The Council spit on Jesus and hit Him with their fists.
“Oh, sorry.”

The guards slapped Him.
“Oh, sorry, sorry.”

Peter denied Him.
“Oh, sorry.”

The crowd shouted, “Crucify him! Crucify him!”
“Oh, sorry, sorry.”

The soldiers slammed a crown of thorns on His head and mocked Him.
“Oh, sorry.”

They led Him away and crucified him.
“Oh, sorry, sorry.”

As the story was read in his heart language, Mindo had a deeply emotional and powerful experience vividly reliving the last hours of Christ’s life in his mind. He felt the shame and humiliation Jesus suffered. He felt his own personal shame because he realized that Jesus endured each of these things for him. He saw, as he had never seen before, Jesus, Son of God, Savior.

May everyone who reads or hears the Word as it goes forth in Waran be as personally and emotionally affected as Mindo. Then the Christ of history will become the Living Christ with power to challenge and change lives.

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Thank God for His powerful, life-changing Scripture.

Thank God for the impact Mark 14 had on Mindo as he heard it read in his language.

Pray that the Waran people will soon have the entire New Testament in their language and that it will penetrate and transform their lives as they worship Jesus and serve Him as their Savior and Lord.

Pray that God’s Word will have a life-changing impact on more and more people in the 58 language groups where Pioneer Bible Translators now serves.

Pray for a fresh hunger and thirst to daily feed your soul on God’s written message to you. Thank Him for those who have enabled you to have the Bible in your language.

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In just a few weeks, we will be celebrating Easter once again.  This is the time we rejoice that Jesus conquered death and was resurrected from the grave.  But let us never forget the terrible suffering that Jesus endured on our behalf.  To deal with the problem of sin which separated Mankind from God, Jesus had to die on the cross, carrying all of our sins with Him.  He was put to death to finally eliminate the cause of our spiritual death and separation from God.

When we slow down the details of Jesus’ trials and the suffering and pain He endured, even before He went on the cross, is really quite gruesome.  But that is a picture of what sin has done to all of us.  One by one, the sinful actions we had done would inflict another lash of Satan’s attack on our souls and reap the punishment of God’s holy wrath.

But Jesus took our place and took that punishment for sin that ought to have been ours.  When we realize the full impact of this, I believe that we too, just like Mindo, would hang our heads in shame at what our sinful actions had done to Jesus, the very Son of God.

But praise be to God, Jesus was able to bear our sins, nail them to the cross, and rise victorious over sin, Satan and death.  And for us who believe in Jesus, we too will exerience this same kind of resurrection to a new life with God forever.  Hallelujah!

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2012 Review of “The Listening Post”

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Thank You WordPress.com

As a blog writer for wordpress.com, I am given a summary each year of the highlights and high moments from the past year of blogging.  It has been my joy and my privilege to share over 140 new articles in 2012.  These have primarily been stories of what God has been doing around the world through the ministry of Bible translation, in-depth studies on the Gospel of John, and a review of a book by Max Lucado.

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys have prepared a 2012 annual report for “The Listening Post“.  I hope you will enjoy this graphic designed report.

Here’s an excerpt:

4,329 films were submitted to the 2012 Cannes Film Festival. This blog had 16,000 views in 2012. If each view were a film, this blog would power 4 Film Festivals

Click here to see the complete report.

God bless and Happy New Year!

Mission Internship In Papua New Guinea

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Through The Eyes of a New Missionary

Pioneer Bible Translators is growing rapidly in the number of career missionaries.  There is still such a big job out there to try to start language projects in every language group of the world that needs a translation.  One of the ways in which we are proactive in the area of recruitment, is to have young people go to the mission field for a summer experience.  Below is a letter from our of our 2012 interns to Papua New Guinea.  Catch the excitement as she shares about her first-time experience to PNG.

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I am currently having a splendid time on the other side of the world and have added a new location to the places I consider home.  After finishing the two weeks of training in Texas and saying goodbye to my other intern friends who went to another country, our group of three successfully completed the 50 hours of travel, making several tight connections and arriving safely in Madang with our luggage!  We spent one full day in the city before catching a small MAF mission plane and went out to a remote village.

The missionary who lead our excursion grew up in this village while her parents worked on translating the Bible into the language of the people.  She works in the PBT (Pioneer Bible Translators) office in Madang, so going back to the village, for her, was really like going home. Not only did the people welcome her as their family but they also welcomed us.  We were so well loved by the people; they took us in and treated us like family and it was wonderful.

This village is so beautiful and is built right on a spectacular river.  The landscape is dotted with coconut palms and fruit trees and picturesque thatched houses.  We were constantly surrounded by breathtaking views. It was so beautiful; we basically lived in a postcard for two weeks.  We stayed in the missionary house,  which is in the middle of the village. 

 

Our primary task was language learning, so on a typical day, we would go to one of the neighboring houses and do whatever the people were doing and try to pick up as much Tok Pisin (which is the PNG trade language) as we could.  We would often sit with the women as they made bilums (which are the all purpose bags that are made out of woven string and I even learned to make one myself).

The people in Papua New Guinea live off what they can hunt or gather from the land.  Some days we went to the gardens and helped gather fire wood or bring back yams or we hiked to the sago swamps and helped in the laborious process of harvesting the white paste from the middle of a certain kind of palm tree.  Sago is served in a number of different ways but is best fried with grub worms imbedded in it.  (Not really, but it was worth the experience. It is best, fried, sans grubs).

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Although most meals we ate in our own food in the house, the women were happy to teach us to cook over an open fire and to help make their meals.  Some of our other experiences include hiking to see a WWII plane that had crashed in the area, going fishing, visiting the school in the village, going to a neighboring village and meeting with the national translators, having a village wide meal, learning some of the native song and dance, and swimming in our fantastic river nearly every day.

My time in the village was wonderful and I would still rather be there.  I did a lot of really cool things, but more importantly I built wonderful relationships and was sad to leave the people who had become so dear to me after such a short time.  I am proud to say that my language learning went well and after only two weeks I can understand most of what I hear and carry on a decent conversation.

The time of meeting with the national translator was very helpful and encouraging.  Throughout this entire time, God has been confirming His call on my life.  I know that being a Bible translator and living so far away will not be easy but I am trusting that God will give me the strength to do what He has called me to.  I am excited to say that I have left a piece of my heart in PNG and have found another place to call home.

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As a “veteran” missionary and Bible translator, I am thrilled when I read letters, such as the one above.  At times, when I go back to PNG on another trip, I can sometimes forget to look around and enjoy the beautiful scenery around me since I have been over there so many times.  But most times I do get that sense again of being transported over into a true Paradise on earth.

More importantly, I am very encouraged when I read of the excitement that a new missionary has on their first-time experiences.  And to see one write of her desire to come back and work long-term as a Bible translator is definitely the best news of all.  I only had a brief chance to meet this young woman in Dallas as she was in my “Introduction to Linguistics” class before she flew to PNG.  But I look forward to the day that God will bring her back to PNG as a full-time missionary.

Remember: “the harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few”.
Praise God for this potential new Bible translator who wants to return to PNG to serve the Lord in Bible translation.

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* If this article has been helpful to you and a blessing, please invite your friends to come visit this devotional blog site.

My Life Testimony – Pt. 7

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My Online Christian Magazine Interview – Pt. 7

Recently, I was interviewed by a Christian magazine regarding my life in Christ and the translation work that I have been involved with for over 17 years now. In this seventh and final article that includes a portion of the questionnaire, I talk about how God has helped me through spiritually to continue serving Him in spite of the muscle disease which showed up in 2008.  My prayer is that what I wrote will be a blessing to you, and be a testimony to the greatness of God who has empowered me to do His work.

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Q12: The muscle disease seems to be your next big challenge out of the blue. It is simply amazing that you keep going on despite the hindrance. How do you focus on the work when the pain comes?

[Editor’s Note: The following section is a continuation of Question 12 from “My Life Testimony – Pt. 6”]

I must mention one other very important way in which God has helped me through the past year and a half.  In the summer of 2010, the time when our PNG Director became sick and died, God used Jill to help me deal with my own pain and suffering.  The husband of our Director was quite an avid blog writer, and he found that he could deal with the sudden death of his wife through his blog writing.  Jill could see that I was still floundering in my emotional and spiritual state at that time, so she suggested that I also try to write from my heart about what was happening in my life.  That is how “The Listening Post” began.

If you go back to the very first articles, you can see how I was trying to deal with my disease, and part of that was trying to use humor to cover over my pain.  But God convicted me of that, and very quickly I realized that I had much to be thankful for in my life and that it would be much better to talk about what God had done in and through me over the years, than to complain about my illness.  This thought was further reinforced by my mother who had been asking me for years to “tell my story” about all my mission experiences.

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Within a couple months of “writing my story” down in my blog site, I saw that many people were starting to read my articles and I was hearing from quite a few people of how blessed they were after reading my articles.  Most of my days are spent sitting in my recliner chair with my legs up to manage the pain, and I had no idea that God was calling me to use my time at home while I sat in front of my computer to be a ministry outreach to other people on the other end of the Internet.  Jill has given this a name and says that God has blessed me with an “Armchair Ministry”.

I can say in all honesty that this blog writing has been as much a blessing to me as it has been to my audience.  In 2009 and 2010, my eyes were on myself and the misery I felt from daily pain and barely having any life outside my home.  Now I look forward to every article I write as God reminds me of His faithfulness over the years, and continues to teach me new truths from His Word.  I can hardly wait to get back to the computer to share another article with my audience.  My life is no longer consumed by focusing in on my pain; it has expanded to see God and His goodness and His glory.

Q14: Finally, could you share with our readers, the invaluable joy of following Jesus and the great rewarding feeling that helped you triumph over all your life’s trial?

In Revelation 7:9-10 it says, “After this I looked and there before me was a great multitude that no one could count, from every nation, tribe, people and language, standing before the throne and in front of the Lamb. They were wearing white robes and were holding palm branches in their hands. And they cried out in a loud voice: “Salvation belongs to our God, who sits on the throne, and to the Lamb.” 

There is no greater blessing than seeing the faces of people here in PNG (or anywhere) really light up with joy and reverence as they hear the Word of God spoken in their mother tongue language.  We have heard many times the people say, “Before, God only spoke the White Man’s language; now God is speaking my language.”  And the message of God ignites a fire of faith in the hearts of these people. 

It will be my joy one day up in Heaven to have people coming to me from all these language groups that I have worked with and say to me, “Because you gave of your life and helped to bring God’s Word to us in our language, we too have come to believe in Jesus and we stand around the Throne of Glory as brothers and sisters in the faith, singing praises to our God.”

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This completes the articles on the interview that I had from the magazine “Guideposts”.  It was an honor to be chosen by one of the editors of that magazine.  What I have not mentioned is that it was for the Korean office that I was interviewed.  The article about my life and work as a Bible translator, and as someone who depends on God for strength each day to be able to do this work went out across Korea in over 10,000 copies of the magazine.  My prayer is that all I have shared will bring glory to God in Korea, and around the world wherever these blog articles are being read.  May God bless you richly.

* If this article has been helpful to you and a blessing, please invite your friends to come visit this devotional blog site.

God’s Plans For Training National Translators

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“Go To PLAN B!”

[Editor’s Note: the following story and petitions for prayer were written in August, 2010 by one of our career missionaries who live in the town of Madang, Papua New Guinea. ]

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“Flight cancelled! Flight cancelled! Another flight cancelled. All of our scheduled small plane and helicopter flights to Madang were cancelled due to rain and clouds on that day in July. Oh no! That was the day national translators were due to come in from the bush [Editor: the remote jungle regions of Papua New Guinea] for the Village Checking and Back Translation Course. So what did we do? We switched to Plan B!

We loaded the truck from the Nobonob Training Center with those who came in by PMV (Public Motor Vehicle) along with our Madang PBT staff and helpers and headed on up the hill to Nobonob. With only half of the students and teachers available for the first day of the course, the classes were combined and all the students began translating the five shellbook series ‘How the Jews Live’, which had been scheduled as a Saturday elective. This series of books provides cultural information that will assist the national translators in understanding foreign concepts found in the Bible.

The following day, the rest of the students and teachers arrived at Nobonob, and we were able to split the group into the planned two sessions and proceed with training that will hopefully enable national translators to progress beyond the rough draft stage of translation on their own and improve the quality of the vernacular translations they bring in for consultant checking.”

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Gratitude For Great Helpers

“We are grateful to Wycliffe Bible Translators for renting us their Nobonob Pacific Orientation Course facilities located on a beautiful hilltop location not far from Madang. We were also thankful for them providing meals for some 60 participants for this three week course. Though official plans have been drawn up for PBT’s proposed national translators’ housing in Madang, we do not have space for such a course as this, which involved national translators from nine different language groups. Please pray that sufficient funding will be available to begin construction on this project this fall or early next year.”

[Editor’s Note:  By faith, last year in 2011, the members of our PNG Branch of Pioneer Bible Translators made the decision to go ahead and construct a two-story building in Madang.  This facility will have 10 rooms with two beds each, two family rooms, and two large conference size rooms for teams who are working on Bible translation projects.  Praise God for the funds that have come in to have it mostly paid for.]

“We also rejoice that a former PBT translator was able to come from the U.S. to serve as a mentor for one of the language teams. He and our summer mission interns mentored several language groups. The interns also performed a myriad of other important tasks including a great deal of data entry and presentation of devotional thoughts in Tok Pisin, the trade language of PNG, which all of the language groups present could understand. The interns had worked hard to learn as much Pidgin as they could during their brief stay in PNG villages prior to the course.”

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Farewells & Prayer Concerns

“Our eleven summer interns returned to the USA August 10th, along with one of our Short-term Assistant ladies who oversaw most of the logistical needs for the Branch. Her service this past year has proved invaluable, and with her gone, that will leave a big hole in the operations of our Branch. But we pray some of them will eventually return to serve again with us here in PNG. Please pray with us about this.

Please also be praying:

  • That those who attended the Village Checking and Back Translation Course will be able to put their newly learned skills to good use.
  • For sufficient funds to construct our much needed National Translators’ Housing here in Madang
  • For our summer interns and the Short-term Assistant while they are back in the United States. Continue to pray for God’s guidance as to where and how they will serve Him.
  • For continued success in recruiting new workers to help complete the task of providing God’s Word for the Bible-less peoples of the world. The needs of our mission staff here in PNG are great.”

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[Editor’s Closing Note: there was certainly a lot of logistical details that went into the planning and execution of this program to bring 41 national men and women, and 21 missionaries and summer interns together to have this training course.  Things often go wrong in all that we try to do here in PNG, simply because of the rugged nature of the country and the unpredictability of the weather.

But we have lots to be praising God for now at this point.  We have a good number of national Bible translators who have had some training to get this task done of bringing God’s Word to the people of PNG in the language of their hearts.  It is a slow process and there is much to be done in doing a translation of Scripture as you will see in the next part of this two-part article.

And we also are constantly praising God for all the people who pray for this ministry of Bible translation in PNG, and those who support the work we do financially.  Without their help and God’s sustaining hand, we would not be able to accomplish this task for Him.  Together, we are all a part of a large team who are committed to bringing the Gospel to the ends of the earth.]

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