Mission Internship In Papua New Guinea

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Through The Eyes of a New Missionary

Pioneer Bible Translators is growing rapidly in the number of career missionaries.  There is still such a big job out there to try to start language projects in every language group of the world that needs a translation.  One of the ways in which we are proactive in the area of recruitment, is to have young people go to the mission field for a summer experience.  Below is a letter from our of our 2012 interns to Papua New Guinea.  Catch the excitement as she shares about her first-time experience to PNG.

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I am currently having a splendid time on the other side of the world and have added a new location to the places I consider home.  After finishing the two weeks of training in Texas and saying goodbye to my other intern friends who went to another country, our group of three successfully completed the 50 hours of travel, making several tight connections and arriving safely in Madang with our luggage!  We spent one full day in the city before catching a small MAF mission plane and went out to a remote village.

The missionary who lead our excursion grew up in this village while her parents worked on translating the Bible into the language of the people.  She works in the PBT (Pioneer Bible Translators) office in Madang, so going back to the village, for her, was really like going home. Not only did the people welcome her as their family but they also welcomed us.  We were so well loved by the people; they took us in and treated us like family and it was wonderful.

This village is so beautiful and is built right on a spectacular river.  The landscape is dotted with coconut palms and fruit trees and picturesque thatched houses.  We were constantly surrounded by breathtaking views. It was so beautiful; we basically lived in a postcard for two weeks.  We stayed in the missionary house,  which is in the middle of the village. 

 

Our primary task was language learning, so on a typical day, we would go to one of the neighboring houses and do whatever the people were doing and try to pick up as much Tok Pisin (which is the PNG trade language) as we could.  We would often sit with the women as they made bilums (which are the all purpose bags that are made out of woven string and I even learned to make one myself).

The people in Papua New Guinea live off what they can hunt or gather from the land.  Some days we went to the gardens and helped gather fire wood or bring back yams or we hiked to the sago swamps and helped in the laborious process of harvesting the white paste from the middle of a certain kind of palm tree.  Sago is served in a number of different ways but is best fried with grub worms imbedded in it.  (Not really, but it was worth the experience. It is best, fried, sans grubs).

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Although most meals we ate in our own food in the house, the women were happy to teach us to cook over an open fire and to help make their meals.  Some of our other experiences include hiking to see a WWII plane that had crashed in the area, going fishing, visiting the school in the village, going to a neighboring village and meeting with the national translators, having a village wide meal, learning some of the native song and dance, and swimming in our fantastic river nearly every day.

My time in the village was wonderful and I would still rather be there.  I did a lot of really cool things, but more importantly I built wonderful relationships and was sad to leave the people who had become so dear to me after such a short time.  I am proud to say that my language learning went well and after only two weeks I can understand most of what I hear and carry on a decent conversation.

The time of meeting with the national translator was very helpful and encouraging.  Throughout this entire time, God has been confirming His call on my life.  I know that being a Bible translator and living so far away will not be easy but I am trusting that God will give me the strength to do what He has called me to.  I am excited to say that I have left a piece of my heart in PNG and have found another place to call home.

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As a “veteran” missionary and Bible translator, I am thrilled when I read letters, such as the one above.  At times, when I go back to PNG on another trip, I can sometimes forget to look around and enjoy the beautiful scenery around me since I have been over there so many times.  But most times I do get that sense again of being transported over into a true Paradise on earth.

More importantly, I am very encouraged when I read of the excitement that a new missionary has on their first-time experiences.  And to see one write of her desire to come back and work long-term as a Bible translator is definitely the best news of all.  I only had a brief chance to meet this young woman in Dallas as she was in my “Introduction to Linguistics” class before she flew to PNG.  But I look forward to the day that God will bring her back to PNG as a full-time missionary.

Remember: “the harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few”.
Praise God for this potential new Bible translator who wants to return to PNG to serve the Lord in Bible translation.

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* If this article has been helpful to you and a blessing, please invite your friends to come visit this devotional blog site.

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Our 2012 Work With Pioneer Bible Translators

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What  We  Did  During This Past Winter

As Jill and I reflect over the past few months of activity, it is hard to believe that we travelled over 22,000 miles from Calgary, Alberta to Madang, Papua New Guinea and back.  That is almost the same as travelling once all the way around the world.  We have been doing this once or twice a year now over the past four years, and as far as we can tell, we believe that God is calling us to do this on a regular basis for many more years to come.

This past trip has been the longest one for us since our assignment in East Africa in 2006-2007.  Norm went over first to PNG in mid-January and came back home at the end of April, 3 ½ months in all, and Jill was able to join him for six weeks in the middle.  Part of the reason for Norm being over there so long was to help him get out of the cold Canadian winter weather which causes him to be in so much pain in all of his muscles.

While there, Norm was able to complete the consultant check of the second half of John in one language.  Then he did the Advisor Checking of John in the Akukem language which took two months.  The third project was to do the consultant check on Daniel for the Aruamu who are now working on the Old Testament.  Jill was able to help with some curriculum revision work and also assist with some administrative tasks in the office.

A  Closer  Look  At  The  Work  Of Bible Translation

So what does a Translation Consultant or Advisor do when checking a translation of a book of the Bible?  It is hard to summarize in just a few words, but basically we go through a translation verse-by-verse, checking to see if the text accurately reflects the message of the New Testament Greek, or Old Testament Hebrew.  We also make sure that the translation sounds natural in the language of the people and communicates well.

Sometimes we wrestle with special terms such as “The Passover”.  We usually use a descriptive phrase.  So is it “the Big-Day-to-remember-when-God-passed-over-the-people-and-now-they-remain-good” or is it “the Big-Day-when-God-freed-His-people-and-they-are-good”?  But now some groups know the OT background of the Exodus story and they are starting to use the pidginized English word “Pasova”.  Choices can be difficult.

Of course there are some funny bloopers that can happen in translation work.  Like when the one group tried to use “the big head men” as a term for “Jewish authorities.  But one man said that sounded like “big pumpkin-headed people”.  So we decided to call them the “the head men” which means the “chief leaders”.

It may take weeks or even months to check every verse, but the goal is to present the “clear Word of God”.

 All  The  Blessings  And  People We  Are  Thankful  For

It is very clear to us that God had His hand upon us and the work we were doing over in PNG.  Many people had asked us before the trip if we thought Norm would do well for so long on this trip.  Other than dealing with the usual fatigue and pain that he has, Norm did not get sick throughout the entire time, and only missed two half days of work in the three month period.

We are so grateful for the hospitality of Carl & Pat Whitehead who let Norm stay with them and moved his recliner chair into their living room so that he could do the checking work for them and their language team.  In two weeks time, their book of John was checked and is now ready for publishing.

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On Valentine’s Day, Norm flew down from the highlands to Madang where our PBT office is, and then greeted Jill who had just come into the country to be with him and to help in the PBT office. What a blessing it was to be together for those next six weeks.

And we are so very thankful for all the people who kept us in their prayers and who faithfully gave donations to make it possible for us to go to PNG and do this ministry work.  Without such faithful support for us and this work, it would be so much more difficult to do all this.  Together, we are all one great big team of God’s people who are working to get the translated Word of God into the hands of the local people of Papua New Guinea.

Where  Do  We  Go  From  Here

We now know that God has indeed opened up the door for Norm to continue serving as a translation consultant and we just got the news that Jill has been granted her Working Permit for PNG.  She should be granted her long-term Entry Visa in the next few weeks.

We’re not quite sure what this will mean for Jill, but it does open up the door to do more than volunteer help when Jill comes over with Norm on these trips.  We do ask that you pray with us for wisdom for this.

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During the next 4-5 months we will both be in Calgary as Jill continues her work as a nurse at the hospital here and Norm will work at home on a variety of translation projects.  Thank goodness for the Internet, right?

In the Fall, we will probably look at Norm spending about six weeks at least in Dallas where our Int’l headquarters are for PBT.  He cannot function well physically in colder weather, so we are thankful that he has the option to work at projects while in Dallas.

For us to be able to keep going ahead with all that we see God laying before us, we will need more people to consider becoming financial partners with us in this ministry work.  We have done well so far in the first half of 2012, but in part that has been because of some special donation gifts.  Realistically, we are operating right now at about 75% of our ideal budget.  We ask all who read this newsletter to consider responding to the address below to become partners with us in this work.

* You can write to us at norm.weatherhead@gmail.com if you would like to know how to become a financial partner with us in this ministry work of bringing God’s Word to the people of Papua New Guinea.

God Allows My Disease To Strike

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Who Am I?  Part 25

In the last article about my life journey, I shared how I felt about becoming trained to be a Bible Translation Consultant.  (Read it here.)  By the time I had finished my training, I truly felt that I had found my real calling in life.  Everything else that had happened previously in my life all seems to make sense now.  All the education, the traveling, the mission experiences, being a deep thinker and having an analytical mind.  All of this would be useful experiences and skills to draw upon to help me be a good consultant.

And then my muscle disease hit.  And I mean this quite literally, for within days of returning from a consultant trip to Papua New Guinea, I was knocked off my feet and could barely walk across my living room floor.  When I first got back from PNG and started having aches and pains in my hips, I figured that I had just over worked myself.  It had been a hectic six weeks of work, with running through airports both going and coming, and I had been doing 12 – 14 hours of language work in the last week I was there in PNG.

But the aches and pain spread through most of my lower body, as well as weakened my arms and chest, to the point that I had to grab on to walls, chairs, ledges or anything there was to make my way slowly across the living room floor area.  Obviously all of us were very concerned and wondered what was wrong with me.  But I think the greater shock to us was just how rapidly my body deteriorated.  In just six weeks, I went from being a globe-trotter to distant countries, to being crippled up in my own home.

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Within three weeks of coming home from PNG, I was at my doctor’s office and asking him to help find out the cause of these increased aches and pains.  This led to the normal blood tests and screening for any unusual tropical disease.  But they showed nothing unusual.  And the symptoms got worse.  This led me to be seen by a rheumatologist and also my GP ordered for me to have a variety of deep x-rays and bone scans to be done.  Nothing was discovered, and my symptoms got worse.

Then I saw a neurologist.  He quickly made the assessment that I was not facing a neurological disorder, but rather a muscular disorder, and specifically a mitochondrial disease.  What’s most interesting about this doctor is that he just happened to be the same neurologist who had seen my sister 30 years prior to seeing me.  He had diagnosed my sister as having a mitochondrial myopathy back then, and now believed that the disease which had led to my sister’s death at age 32 was now manifesting itself in me.

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And it was at that moment that I first went into major denial.  I said to myself, “There’s no way I can have the same debilitating disease that my sister had!”  In fact, back in the 70’s, after having done muscle biopsies on Lorna, then my mom, and even my grandmother, they saw there was something wrong and which was getting progressively worse each generation.  But they assured us all back then that this was a female disease only.  So there was no concern or thought that I or my brothers would be affected by the disease.

Well, they know better now.  While it is still true that this mitochondrial myopathy is female linked, they now know that a mother can pass on the disease to all of her children, and her daughter will most likely pass it on to her children.  So that means that all of my mother’s sons (me and my two brothers) can receive what they found, a mutation on the DNA of our mitochondria, but we should not be able to pass it on to our sons.  I pray that is true, since Jill and I have two sons.

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So how did this all affect me and my translation ministry?  Well, to be honest, it just about devastated me emotionally.  And it pretty much put a screeching halt on many of our ministry plans.  I cancelled one trip I had planned to go on to Africa for a month to help teach nationals how to become Bible translators.  I did go ahead along with Jill in the fall of ’08 to PNG for a short 4 week trip to check some Scriptures.  We went over to PNG still under a cloud of uncertainty of what the disease was and did not get my full diagnosis until after the trip.

The more important question in this whole situation was “Where was God in all of this?”  Some people automatically thought it was terrible that I would be struck down with this in the prime of my life and what looked like the highest peak of my missionary career.  But you know, I don’t ever remember asking God the question of “Why me Lord?”  I’ve come to learn long ago that just because we are Christians does not mean we are immune to the catastrophes and the ailments that go along with being a part of this fallen world.

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Actually, I was able to see God’s hand was upon me in a positive way when I stepped back to look at things.  First, we were back in Canada when the disease struck.  It would have been terrible if it had hit me while we were in Africa the year before.  Secondly, we found out that this disease usually shows up in puberty.  So God allowed me to have 48 good years before it hit.  And finally, Calgary just happens to have one of the best geneticists in the world who diagnosed me and is trying all he can do to help me.

This is part one of my “disease story”.  Come back in two weeks to read part two and see what great things have occurred since God first allowed this disease to surface and affect me.  There is a lot of good news to come.

God’s Traveling Team Pt. 1

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Who Am I?  Part 5

1979 was  an exciting year as well as a transitional year.  I had finished one year of University, and at the same time I was preparing to go on my first real missionary experience with Teen Missions International (TMI).  I was going to go to Brazil for a summer and help build a school extension and a guest house for a New Tribes Mission base up the Amazon river.  That will be the content for a future story.

What I can say is that the summer mission experience was life changing for me.  From the very beginning of the training we received in the swampy Everglades of Florida, until the summer mission project was finished, I knew that I had discovered a mission that I could believe in and put my energies into.  You can read about the Boot Camp training we received before we went to our overseas country in another article called, “Get Dirty For God“.

During the Boot Camp time, I did hear something that caught my attention.  Some of the TMI staff told all of us about a marvelous opportunity to serve the Lord after we had finished our summer mission.  What they wanted to do was to form one or two small teams that would travel all over North America to visit churches and Christian schools to do recruitment and advertise for Teen Missions.

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And so as my summer time in Brazil came to a close, I thought about my two options: go back to the university in Calgary, or travel around North America and do mission presentations.  Hmmm….tough choice, right?  Well, actually it was.  Considering that I had received enough scholarships to pay for four years of university training, the idea of giving that up and trusting God to provide enough money for me to buy my next meal was quite a staggering idea for an 18-year-old.

But I felt the leading of God’s Spirit to say yes to the idea of joining a Teen Missions Travel Team.  And part of my personal confirmation of this was the fact that at the last minute, while I was raising support donations for my summer mission work, a donation came in that nearly doubled what I needed for the summer.  (You can read that story here.)  And that was enough to carry me through part of the Fall.

And so when I came back from Brazil, I asked the leaders of TMI if I could join one of their travel teams and they said yes.  I had a few days in Florida before the training started, and I phoned back to Calgary to talk everything over with my parents.  Just like with my decision to go off with the Navy, my parents once again gave me their blessing to follow my own decision.

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The Travel Team training was conducted at a camp in New Jersey and lasted two weeks.  There were enough volunteer members that we were able to form two teams.  During this time, we learned a number of important skills for doing presentations, like short dramas, puppet skits, musical arrangements, working with stage props and becoming familiar with the TMI promotional materials.

Once we finished our training, we immediately hit the road and started driving toward our first places to do our presentations.  The other team headed toward a different state, while our team headed toward Canada where we were  going to do some presentations in Ontario and then head west across Canada.  I guess they figured I would be their personal tour guide across the country being the only Canadian on the team.  : )

We went through the state of New York and crossed the bridge at Buffalo, NY to enter Canada.  The Customs Officer there asked our leader lots of questions about what our Travel Team was going to do and I think he got nervous and started telling a whole lot more than he needed to.  So when he got to the part about how we would visit churches and they would take up an offering, immediately the Officer thought this was a form of “work” and denied the team entry into Canada.  : (

Although we tried to convince the Officer we were not coming into Canada illegally to do work, we still ended up going back to Buffalo in the middle of the night.  And what a night that was!  On that night, God showed His hand powerfully in both providing for our team and also protecting my life personally from a life threatening situation.  And that unfortunately will also have to wait until a later posting.

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Now to make a long story short, the rest of the team went back to Florida while I went back to Calgary for a few weeks until we could come up with a new plan and a new travel itinerary.  It worked out that our team was able to come back together to do a tour of schools and churches in the province of British Columbia and the states of Washington, Oregon and Idaho.  (We had a new leader this time and so getting across the border into Canada went well.  Hurrah!!)  : )

Stay tuned for many more stories about my adventures with Teen Missions.

God Will Supply

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How I Became a Missionary – Part 2

In 1979, I learned a huge lesson in the area of trusting God.  It started in the Summer of 1978, it was challenged through the Winter and Spring of 1979, and then was rewarded in the Summer of 1979 with a success so fantastic that it blew my mind, but swelled my heart with love for God and increased my  faith considerably.

Here’s how it began.  I attended a High School-Young Adult camp week at our church’s Christian Camp.  The entire week was great, but the hour session that I looked forward to the most was the daily presentation from different missionaries.  For three years at this point, I was firm in my belief that God was calling me to become a missionary.  In an earlier post, “God Spoke Through People“, I shared about four individuals that influenced my life to eventually become a Bible Translator.  But there was one more woman named Lois who impacted me powerfully at this Youth Camp in the Summer of 1978.

I think it was a Wednesday that Lois spoke to our group about a mission which she had gone on, Teen Missions International.  She showed us her pictures, she told us what the project was and what country they worked in.  But what caught my attention most was the fact that Teen Missions accepts Teenagers to go on these mission trips.  Makes sense, since that is part of their mission title.  But I had been dreaming of doing mission work for three years now, and in all that time, I never came across a mission that could really use teenagers.

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So I took the literature and was amazed to see that each summer, TMI was sending over 1500 teenagers all around the globe to more than 50 countries in the world.  Hot Dog!!  That Fall I started my first year at the University of Calgary, but I did another first too.  I made my first application to a mission group.  I was determined to go the next year into the deep Amazon rainforest and do construction on a New Tribes Mission  base camp in the jungle.

The two requirements, besides being a Christian, were to get 100 prayer supporters to stand with me on this mission experience, and to raise the financial support to pay for the trip.  The first requirement was easy as I had accepted Christ and was baptized when I was 12 and been actively part of the church since then.  To raise up 100 Prayer Partners was a challenge, but this too fell into place after I shared my vision for doing mission work with many people.  It was the third requirement that became the real test.  It tested me to see who I really was, and it tested my faith in God.

I believe the original target was for me to raise $1,450 to be on a Brazil team.  The acceptance package that I got from TMI had lots of ideas of how to raise support, and it included about 100 bookmark prayer cards with my picture and details of the project.  The info in the package explained the need to have as many prayer and financial partners standing behind you to help make this goal of becoming a missionary possible.

But at this point in my Christian life, I was not at the point that I felt comfortable asking people for money so I could go on this “Grand Exciting Missionary Adventure”.  I felt that as a strong 18-year-old, who already held down two-part time jobs along with University studies, could find ways to earn his own money to pay for the trip.  By late Winter, just before classes ended, I added a third part-time job, and after school was out, I added a fourth part-time job.  See what I mean?  I was strong.  I was able.  I didn’t need other people.  (Oops, see where this is going?)

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And then an amazing thing happened.  One by one, I ended up losing not one or two, but all of my four jobs.  Some had been temporary, some the work declined and they let some of us go, and one job said they didn’t need me anymore.  I don’t think I was fired, but I certainly was released.  And there I was about one month away from my time of departure for the mission trip, and I was still quite a few hundred dollars short.

I was in shock!  I was angry with God!  Didn’t He want me to be a missionary?  I begged God, I pleaded with Him to help me find one more job to get the money together.  Then he reminded me about the fund-raising packet I had been sent.  I really couldn’t see how people, most of whom knew very little about me, would ever decide to support this mission trip.  But slowly my stubborn heart broke before God, and I said I would send out the materials, and trust in Him to see the remainder come in.

The instructions said to make a list of everyone you knew, family, friends, teachers, long-lost relatives, people you met even 5 years ago, etc.  I was somewhat skeptical, but I did what it told me to do.  And then I did the only other thing I could do.  I prayed, and I prayed, and I prayed.  And I found I got to the place where I really did believe that God could do this.  And in the coming days, I saw letters come back to me,  some with encouraging words, some with a cheque.  And often, the gift was only $10 or $20.  But it did start to add up and I could see the goal getting closer each day.

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And then it came down to the last week before I was to leave.  I was still about $150 short.  I laid this before God, and I said, “God, if you really, really want me to do this and begin my journey to becoming a missionary, then I am asking you to not only supply the final $150, but do it in such a way that I will never doubt your faithfulness to sustain me nor doubt my calling to be a missionary.”

It was the night before I was to leave, and still I was short some money.  Then somehow, from somewhere, I can’t remember because I thought I might be wrong about this whole thing, I found that an envelope had been put in my hands.  When I asked my mom who it was from or where it came from, she said she didn’t know.  So I slowly opened the envelope, and inside it was a cheque.  I held my breath as I slowly pulled it out.  I turned it over and almost stopped breathing.

The whole trip was about $1,450, I was short still by about $100.  I blinked twice to make sure I wasn’t seeing it wrong.  There in my hands was a cheque for $1,472.  The entire mission trip was completely covered by one anonymous donor.  Not only did God provide for my need, He did so in such a dramatic way (the last night) with such a grand financial gift, that I had no doubt that going on this mission trip was definitely His will for me.  And it was the pivotal moment that gave me my assurance of my calling to be a missionary.

Psalm 34:8  Taste and see that the LORD is good;

blessed is the man who takes refuge in him.

God Triumphs Through Difficult Times

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God Triumphs Through Difficult Times

On June 8, 2010, a letter of invitation was sent asking me to come over to Papua New Guinea to help do the consultant check of Matthew for one of the local language groups.  There had been some discussion about me also doing the consultant check of Hebrews for another group, but dates and circumstances did not allow me to do this on this trip.  Instead, we are anticipating that this may be put into a program plan for a Spring 2011 trip.

During the month of July, I did some initial study of key terms and difficult phrases in Matthew.  This would help me identify potentially difficult parts of Matthew which would need to be examined carefully.  Meanwhile, I was waiting for the VE file of the Matthew translation to be sent to me from PNG.  (A VE is a vernacular to English literal back translation from the village language into English from which I can compare with the Greek NT to spot errors or areas of discussion.)

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At the beginning of August, it was clear that a more pressing matter was arising within the Branch, namely the sudden illness of the Director.  Immediately we began emailing the leadership in PNG and praying as to whether we should actually try to come as planned, or cancel the trip until a later date.  As we dialogued with them, we all came to the decision that we should still come, and trust that we would be able to get some of Matthew checked.

And so I began in mid-August to do intense studies on the Greek text of Matthew, and using a computer program called Paratext, was able to write myself inline text notes.  I noted areas of the Greek text where translation would be difficult or ambiguous, and also made note of various interpretations and cultural issues unique to the biblical era.  These exegetical and cultural notes would help me to evaluate the translation when the back translation was given to me orally, so that even without the written VE, I would be able to spot potential problems and areas needing revision.

Sadly, the Director died on the day I left Canada, and even before we started, we all wondered how this would affect the team and when the memorial for her would take place.  So I went into the sessions expecting that there would be even more delays and interruption.  I think what helped all of us from the beginning was that we all agreed that any verses we could do the consultant check on was still good, and was still moving forward the goal of having the New Testament finished for this language group.

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The date for the memorial was finally set for October 9, the day Jill and I would fly out of PNG, so it did not turn out that we would stop our sessions in the middle of our checking of Matthew.  But then a new area of major concern arose.  Due to a drought and the stagnation of existing water in the region where the national team members lived, scores of them were becoming sick and three people did die during our three weeks of checking.  In addition, the wife and son of the key national translator, were also sent to Wewak for medical attention.  Thankfully, they recovered quickly after getting treatment.

Understandably, this caused the team much distress and concern which made the checking even more difficult.  The final decision by all of us was to end the sessions early and have the men return to the villages so that they might be able to help out and comfort the people during this difficult time.

In spite of all these obstacles that our team faced, it is amazing to look back and see what progress was made and how God’s hand was in all of this.  In 12 days of actual work, we were able to check, correct and revise 20 out of the 28 chapters of Matthew.  We were able to check an average of 56 verses a day, which is pretty good considering the many hard passages of Christ’s teaching.

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Another area for praise is how God sustained us all.  My health was good during the entire time, and I discovered two women in the Center who knew how to do massage therapy so that I could get my legs worked on twice while there.  The massages, along with adequate rest periods each day, allowed me to function with a much lower pain level than I expected.   For this I was very grateful to God, and I am sure the many prayers of God’s people helped to carry me through this trip.

I am also thankful once again that Jill was able to come join me (two weeks later) and then return with me on the trip back to Canada.  She helped me in so many ways to be able to function and live each day over there in PNG.  And she has such a desire to help out, that when a special formatting task was sent up by CD disk from our Publishing Dept on short notice, Jill willingly worked on the computer during my breaks (sharing my computer) and on the weekend to get 166 Shellbooks (literacy picture books with empty text boxes) fully reformatted and ready for use by translators.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

So what is next?  There is already discussion about me and Jill coming in Feb-April of next year.  The book of Hebrews in one language is ready to be checked.  The epistles of Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon and Jude in another language are anticipated to be ready.  And there are still the final eight chapters of Matthew to do for this language group.  Translation consultant checking remains a constant area of need in our overseas branches.  I am just happy that I can be involved and do my part to see God’s Word made available to these language groups.

I must also say thank you to all of you who so faithfully pray for us and support our ministry work with Pioneer Bible Translators.  We  could not do this work without you standing behind us.  Above all, we give thanks to God who has equipped us and sustained us to be able to do this good work.

To Him be all the glory,

Norm & Jill Weatherhead