Summary of Max Lucado’s Book “GOD’S STORY”

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Looking Back, Looking Forward

For the past ten months, we have been on a journey to learn more about God and ourselves as we have gone through Max Lucado’s book “GOD’S STORY, your story.”  Even though it has only been ten chapters long, it has helped us to look at the bigger picture of what God has done in the world (as seen through the pages of Scripture), and it has also helped us to see our lives from a bigger picture perspective.

Let me summarize in a sentence the journey through the pages of the New Testament that we have been on from chapter to chapter, and then remind us of what we have been learning about our own lives:

Chapter One: “Ordinary Matters”  The Son of God entered into the world and became part of a very ordinary Jewish family when He was born in the manger in Bethlehem.

Lesson: God has always delighted to use those things that are ordinary, i.e. a nomadic shepherd names Abraham, Mose’s walking stick, David’s harp, a donkey (who can talk by the way), a manger, a carpenter’s son, average Galileans.  That gives us great hope that God can use average and ordinary people like you and me.

Chapter Two: “You Know Satan’s Next Move”  Jesus was met head on by Satan before He ever performed any ministry.  The devil did everything he could to distract, to test and to tempt Jesus to take a short cut and serve himself rather than obey God.

Lesson: If Jesus, who is the Son of God, was tested and tempted in every way to sin against God the Father, then we should not be surprised when we encounter trials and temptations which would take us away from God.  Our answer should be like Jesus’ as He referred to God’s Word, “It is written….”

Chapter Three: “You Find Your True Home”  Jesus taught about a Kingdom of Heaven that was at hand.  He taught the multitudes to see that this world is not the only world, but rather is the precursor to the world to come.

Lesson: It is extremely easy for us today who live in such an affluent world to settle down and imagine that this is the “Real” life, and the “Abundant Life”.  But in many parables, Jesus tells us about how these material possessions will all disappear one day, and only by being in tune with God will we become members of His Kingdom, both now and forever.

Chapter Four: “You Hear A Voice You Can Trust”  Long before Jesus lived, there were many people who claimed to be a great prophet from God, or even the promised Messiah.  But Jesus  backed up His claim through His teachings, His miracles and ultimately His resurrection.

Lesson: There are many voices out there screaming for our attention, especially in this electronic and digital age we live in.  They offer so many promises, which are either so short-lived or just empty promises, we must come back to the One whose promises are all “Yes” and “Amen” in God the Father.

Chapter Five: “You Won’t Be Forsaken” There were so many broken and helpless people to whom Jesus ministered His love of healing and forgiveness.  Jesus would not forsake anyone who came to Him in faith and who had a need in their life.  Even when Jesus died on the Cross and seemed forsaken Himself by God, Jesus promised the repentant thief on the other cross that he would not be forsaken but arise to live in Paradise with God forever.

Lesson: We much be absolutely sure in our hearts that the love of Jesus covers over every sin and removes them as far as the east is from the west.  When it comes to our final day on earth, if we have put our faith in Christ, then we will not be forgotten or forsaken in the life to come.

Chapter Six: “Your Final Chapter Becomes A Preface”  On that Easter Friday evening, it looked like it was all over for this man, Jesus of Nazareth.  He died.  He was buried, He was sealed in a cave tomb.  But praise be to God, that was not His final chapter.  Now that Death was defeated, Jesus has much work to do to redeem His followers and bring them too out of death and into life.

Lesson: The grave is not the end of our lives.  It is just the beginning of our eternity with God.  I have often compared death with a graduation, as we leave this perishable life behind and gain a life that is imperishable.

Chapter Seven: “Power Moves In” Jesus told his disciples that they were to wait in Jerusalem until the power of God would come upon them.  Finally, the Holy Spirit would now become available for every believer in Christ who would empower them supernaturally to live godly lives and impact others with the Gospel.

Lesson: We are all called to be holy as God is holy and to share our faith with the world and help usher in the Kingdom of God.  By our own strength, we could not do this.  So praise God that we all have the Spirit of God living in us to help us be God’s ambassadors for Him.

Chapter Eight: “The Right Doors Open” Paul was the greatest of God’s ambassadors in the 1st century.  But even he experienced times when God would close doors that he wanted to go through, and open doors of opportunity that he had never expected.  And so the Gospel came over to Europe.

Lesson: There is nothing wrong with making plans, but we must check out these plans with the Lord.  For the Lord may have other plans for us, and they will be plans to help us and to prosper in our service for Him.

Chapter Nine: “All Things Work For Good” I’m sure there were times when Paul could not figure out who things were going to work out.  Especially when you consider the trials he went through.  But invariably, God used what happened to Paul to bring about even greater opportunities to witness and spread the Good News about Jesus.

Lesson: We too cannot look into the things that happen at times and know right then and there what good could come out of a terrible or tragic situation.  But then we will never have the perspective that God has on all of this.  Let us trust Him for the good that He promises to bring out of it.

Chapter 10: “God Will Come For You” God’s Word promises us that one day Jesus will return, and He will come with all the Armies of Heaven, the angels of God, who will come to gather those who believe in Jesus and we all together will see the ushering in of God’s Kingdom.

Lesson: God’s coming Kingdom will motivate His people to rejoice; but it will drive those who do not know Him to fear and despair.  The good news is that it is not too late to yet become a believer in Jesus.  Then when God comes for His children, then you too will welcome Jesus’ return, and be rewarded with eternal life with God forever.  I pray I will be seeing you there!

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* [God’s Story, Your Story] Max Lucado.  Copyright [Thomas Nelson Publishers, 2011]  Used by permission.

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God’s Kingdom Will Come

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“GOD’S STORY, your story” – Pt. 19

We now come to the last chapter in this great book of Max Lucado’s that we have been looking at throughout this year.  As we have gone through the book, we have learned much about God and how He is very interested in and involved in our lives today.  That fact alone is a great encouragement to us, knowing that God is with us, guiding and helping us as we go through the difficult stages and events of life.

But now we must ask ourselves about what to expect at the end of our lives.  For those who do not even believe that God exists, or that there is anything past this life, they have absolutely nothing to look forward to at the end of their lives.  And that is why they try so desperately to experience and enjoy all that they can now.

But that is not really a satisfying answer for many people.  And for those who do believe that there is some kind of afterlife, there is often the accompanying feeling of fear or worry because they have no certainty that they will be granted access to the eternal life of joy and happiness.  Even those who joke about the idea of going to Hell would tremble at the picture of what Hell is really like as portrayed in the Bible.

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Blaise Pascal was a famous 17th century philosopher and mathematician.  He came up with what is known as “Pascal’s Wager“.  He stated that if we had to bet on whether God exists or not, then the obvious (or rational) decision would be to say that God does exist.  For if we gamble and say yes, and it is true, then we will win with eternal consequences.

Thankfully, as I believe, we do not need to wager as to whether God exists or not.  I work from the point of the resurrection backwards.  If Jesus (whom all people now state that he did actually live and die in 1st century Palestine), actually did rise from the dead, then all the things that He taught and claimed to be true, must be true.

Now giving evidence that supports the resurrection is a whole other topic, but I also believe that there is sufficient strength of evidence and testimony to support this.  Perhaps the best book I’ve ever read on this topic was written by Frank Morison called “Who Moved The Stone?”  Suffice it to say again, if Jesus did rise from the dead, then all that He taught about this life and the next life to come must be listened to as credible.

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And this brings us to the topic that Lucado writes about in chapter 10 of his book, namely that there is going to be a day when God will wrap up things here on earth and will usher in His eternal Kingdom.  This is really big news! And the Bible tells us that this will not be quiet or hidden like the first time that Jesus came to earth.  Mark 13:26 says, “Then everyone will see the Son of Man coming on the clouds with great power and glory.

Jesus also talked about how His coming would be like lightning as it streaks across the sky.  Everyone is going to see this great event when Jesus comes back again.  But please note this, that great event will not be received the same way by everyone.  This is what Lucado says on page 158:

“There will be one monumental difference.  Some people will continue the confession they began on earth.  They will crown Christ again, gladly.  Others will crown him for the first time.  They will do so sadly.  They denied Christ on earth, so He will deny them in heaven.”

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 There is perhaps one aspect about the “Kingdom of Heaven” that some people sadly misunderstand.  There are many people who want to be included in God’s Kingdom, and many who believe that they are in fact going to be enjoying the rich blessings of heaven.  But if they have not made the King of the kingdom also the King of their lives here and now, then it will be too late when Christ returns to take His people back home to be with Him and the Father forever.

It is really quite heartbreaking to know that people all around us are unaware of the danger that is coming if they are not prepared to meet with God.  Matthew 24:37-39 puts it this way:

When the Son of Man returns, it will be like it was in Noah’s day. In those days before the flood, the people were enjoying banquets and parties and weddings right up to the time Noah entered his boat. People didn’t realize what was going to happen until the flood came and swept them all away. That is the way it will be when the Son of Man comes.

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But for those who have accepted Christ into their hearts and made Him the Lord of their lives, this future day (which may not be too far away any more) will be the greatest day ever in all of history.  No matter how difficult life may have been here while on earth, the eternal life of God’s presence and His blessings for those who have faithfully loved Him and His Son will greatly outweigh all that has been so painful to bear in this life.

Let me close with a beautiful quote from Lucado on page 159:

“Let this sink in.  You will see the face of God.  You will look into the eyes of the One who has always seen; you will behold the mouth that commands history.  And if there is anything more amazing than the moment you see his face, it’s the moment he touches yours.  “He will wipe every tear from their eyes”  (Revelation 21:4)

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“You Must Be Born Again” – Pt. 1

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John 3:1 – 8

3  1 Now there was a man of the Pharisees named Nicodemus, a ruler of the Jews. 2 This man came to Jesus by night and said to him, “Rabbi, we know that you are a teacher come from God, for no one can do these signs that you do unless God is with him.”

3 Jesus answered him, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born again he cannot see the kingdom of God.” 4 Nicodemus said to him, “How can a man be born when he is old? Can he enter a second time into his mother’s womb and be born?”

5 Jesus answered, “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless one is born of water and the Spirit, he cannot enter the kingdom of God. 6 That which is born of the flesh is flesh, and that which is born of the Spirit is spirit. 7 Do not marvel that I said to you, ‘You must be born again.’ 8 The wind blows where it wishes, and you hear its sound, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit.”

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Chapter 3 of the Gospel of John begins with a fascinating dialog between Jesus and one of the religious leaders named Nicodemus.  The entire dialog goes from verse 1 to verse 21, but I will split this up into three Bible study articles.  There are surprises in store for both Nicodemus and Jesus in this encounter as we will see.

Throughout the dialog, there are some very important themes raised, such as light vs. darkness, regeneration (or the “new birth”), earthly things vs. spiritual things, and the Jewish concept of Rabbi or “Teacher”.  I hope to touch on all of these themes in my three articles.  But first, to give us some context to this story, we must take a close look at who is this man, Nicodemus.

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There is a lot we can learn about Nicodemus in verses 1 and 2.  Immediately we are told that he was “a man of the Pharisees”.  There were many religious groups that existed during the time of Jesus and the most predominant one was the Pharisees.  In Katherine Barnwell’s book “Key Biblical Terms”, she writes this:

Some Pharisees were priests, but many were lay people. They were the party of the common people, in contrast to the Sadducees who were from the rich “upper class”. The leaders of the Pharisees were scribes, but most Pharisees were not trained as scribes; they were ordinary traders and workers.

Now although not all received formal training like the Scribes, most all of them would have received great quantities of informal oral training by literally sitting at the feet of older Pharisees who passed on the traditions of Judaism and their interpretations of the Old Testament scriptures.  In fact, to be a Rabbi, one had to have studied under other well recognized Pharisees.

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Nicodemus though, is not just any average Pharisee; for John writes that he was “a ruler of the Jews”.  He is one of the top leaders of this religious group, very possibly a scribe and perhaps even a member of the Jewish ruling Council, the Sanhedrin.  And yet, notice how he comes to Jesus and approaches him.

We note that Nicodemus came to Jesus at night, and that he has great respect for him since he addressed Jesus as “Rabbi”.  This is quite surprising, seeing as the Pharisees would already have learned that Jesus had not been trained within the Pharisaical order.  Therefore, many scholars think that he came to Jesus during the night partly out of fear of being found out.

So we have a prominent religious leader meeting secretly with Jesus to discuss spiritual matters of great importance.  We learn from verse 2 that Nicodemus has seen (or at least heard about) some of the miracles that Jesus had performed in Jerusalem, and he states his belief that only a man who has been sent by God could perform such mighty acts.

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Then in the next two verses, we see that Nicodemus and Jesus are definitely not on the same page together.  Jesus mentions “entering the Kingdom of God”, a very important topic to the Pharisees.  But Jesus says that a man must be “born again” to be able to enter in.  Nicodemus’ answer shows he lacks the ability to comprehend this statement by asking Jesus how it could ever be possible to re-enter a mother’s womb to be reborn.

Jesus goes on to tell us that there are two realities, the things that pertain to this life and this world (i.e. “the things of the flesh”), and there are things that pertain to spiritual life and the eternal realm (i.e. “the things of the Spirit).  Another way of looking at this is that the “flesh” deals with the physical and the external practices (which the Pharisees were so stuck on in their ritualism), while the “Spirit” deals with the spiritual and inner person.

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Jesus is surprised that Nicodemus is surprised at this teaching.  Then Jesus ends this first part of the dialog by stating that while we cannot see a person become spiritually renewed, just like the wind, we can see the effects of a life that has been transformed and become brand new, or reborn as Jesus would say.

Let me ask you who read this article: does this all make sense to you?  Or are you feeling lost just like Nicodemus was?  Christianity is not a set of rules or regulations to be kept (as the Pharisees believed), but rather it is a relationship between God, who is Spirit, and us, who are also spiritual beings.  Being reborn in our inner self is our “entry ticket” into Heaven.

Christian Perspective On Wealth

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The Plinky Question for this week is:  “What Does Wealth Mean to You?”

That’s an easy question, isn’t it?  I mean, isn’t the answer obvious? Wealth is money, jewelry, fancy cars, exotic holiday locations, power, lots of material objects, land & property, and on and on goes the list.  But if that is the answer, then only a very tiny fraction of people in the world would be considered “wealthy people”.

And yet, there is a stunning and sad fact of life that goes along with the thought just expressed above.  If you ask this question “What is wealth?” to the average person, you will find them stating what I just wrote above.  And then if you ask a related question, “Do you think wealthy people are generally happy?” most people would very quickly answer “No!  I doubt that.”  And why is that do you think?

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Here are a few thoughts:

  1. Rich people get bored.  How many days can you just sit on a beach and drink champagne?
  2. Rich people have to be suspicious of everyone.  Every hand that reaches out to shake their hand will often ask for some kind of hand out or suggest ways that they can help spend that money.
  3. Rich people live in fear.  They become targets for kidnappers and potential blackmail people.
  4. Rich people can buy but not hold friendships.  Once the money is gone, supposed friends seem to disappear.
  5. Rich people cannot escape the inevitable no matter how hard they try.  How many plastic surgeries will they endure to keep looking young, and their money does them no good when they die?

Now if even just half of what I suggest here is true, then there is certainly no way that I ever want to be a really wealthy man.  I mean really, if riches ultimately cannot provide a person with joy and true long-lasting friendships, then why pursue those riches.  (Ah ha, I’ve just revealed a part of what true wealth is: it is having true meaningful relationships with others, and possessing an inner spirit of joy.)

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Just recently, I worked through a Southeast Asia translation on the book of Matthew.  Consider from the English back translation how they translated the words in Mt. 6:19-21:

“Don’t gather treasure for yourself in this world, where termites and rust will destroy that treasure of yours, and a thief can break in and steal it.  Instead, gather your treasure in heaven, where termites and rust cannot destroy it, and a thief cannot break in and steal it.  For where your treasure is, that is where your heart is also.

Notice here the two dangers we face if we build up our “treasures” here on earth?  We face the possibility that either termites or rust will destroy whatever we own.  Now that probably sounds pretty odd to you, doesn’t it?  When was the last time that we had to fight off termites or deal with rust in our comfortable North American homes?

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Consider this from the perspective of someone who lives in a remote village in some developing country though.  And it is more than Southeast Asia that I am thinking of.  It is the Pacific Island countries, the tropical jungle areas of South America, the dusty sun-baked villages of Africa, and many more places in the world.  There is still a majority of the world living in poor to poverty-stricken areas.

For these kinds of people, their vast wealth in life can be listed on a short piece of paper: 2 sets of clothes (maybe), a wooden, mud or bamboo hut, a couple of old dented pots, a machete, and an ax if they are real fortunate, etc.  And so for them, the danger of termites eating through their walls and floors, and rust damaging their few tools and cooking items is certainly a real threat to their livelihood, and perhaps their very survival.

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But Jesus’ words are meant for even these poor people to hear.  We must not put our trust and our hopes in even these few meager items, for life is more than just surviving from day to day.  And life is most certainly more than all the trinkets, gadgets and possessions we have in the West.  No, real life begins and ends in our relationship with God.

You see, it is really all about perspective and values.  If we view life totally from a “Me” perspective, and if we place a high value on the things of this world, then everyone from the billionaire to the shanty town dweller will be yearning for more than what they presently have. So a very “wealthy” person or a destitute person have it all wrong when it comes to what is of true worth in this life.

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In Matthew 13, Jesus teaches many parables, and in verses 44 – 46, Jesus compares the Kingdom of Heaven to a great treasure found buried in a field and to  a fabulous costly pearl found at a market.  Jesus states in these parables that finding the joy or having God rule over one’s life (i.e. the meaning of “Kingdom of Heaven”) is worth so much that a person would be willing to sell all earthly possessions to be able to own that field, to buy that pearl, to become a citizen with God’s Kingdom.

So what is my perspective on wealth?  I know that I am a child of the King, and an heir to all the promises of God and all the blessings and riches of Heaven.  I have the love of God my Father, and the salvation bought for me by Jesus, and the joy and presence of the Holy Spirit, and the fellowship of other believers.  What more could I ever want.  Truly, I am a wealthy man.

The Practice of Prayer

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“We Believe in Prayer” – Part 4

This is the last article on the series on “Prayer”.  I have been blessed to be able to attend the Sunday School teaching hour at Crossroads Christian Church in Grand Prairie, Texas.  In previous articles, we have covered the topics of “The Power of Prayer“, “The Passion for Prayer“, and “The Purpose of Prayer“.  Now we will try to touch on “The Practice of Prayer“.  Of course we will never be able to completely cover this topic, and we will be fortunate to just mention key ideas here right now.

The lesson for the day came from Matthew 6:5 – 13 which covered what we call today “The Lord’s Prayer”, and also includes the preamble of Jesus just before He uttered what is perhaps the best well-known prayer in the world.  And the Lesson Overview given to us is quite straightforward, “This lesson is to show us what vibrant, effective prayer looks like and how we can deal with the things that hinder our prayers.”

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Here is what we can learn from this passage:

1.  We Need to Pray Privately (vv. 5 – 6)

In these two verses, there is a parallelism that puts two very opposite practice of prayer into sharp contrast.  The ritually religious leaders of that day would have the habit of standing up in public and delivering loud and elegant prayers in the presence of many witnesses.  Even if their prayers were genuine petitions before God, it is clear that their motivation was to be seen in public, and to be considered “highly religious” in the eyes of the average person.

The bottom line for the religious leaders was that they wanted to be seen publicly and so receive the praises of men.  This form of outward religious performance is the very opposite of what God wants from His children.  His desire is that we withdraw from others when we pray to God, because He wants us to put our full attention on the Lord, and not seek approval or admiration from men.  Such people who do that Scripture says they already have received their reward (people’s approval), but we are to seek an intimate relationship with God, and He in turn will bless us here in this life, and also grant eternal life in the next.

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2.  We Need to Pray Effectively (vv. 7 – 8 )

In this next short section, before Jesus tells his disciples how to pray, He first reminds them of how not to pray.  Jesus says that we are not to babble when we pray to God.  The picture here is that when “pagans” (unbelievers) pray, they continuously mumble repetitive prayers to God in the false believe that if we pray the same stuff endlessly to God, then surely He will hear our many prayers and He will have to answer.

In effect though, these people are trying to manipulate God and believe that God will eventually give in to whatever they want.  In contrast to this, Jesus tells the disciples that God already knows what our needs are.  And in fact, Jesus says that God already knows what we need even before we ask Him.  Remember, God is omniscient, and He is motivated by love.  Part of the purpose of prayer is to recognize our needs and our true dependence upon God.  That is often the time that God pours out His richest blessings to us, when we are humble, obedient servants who bow to His authority.

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3.  We Need to Pray Specifically(vv. 9 -13)

In this model prayer, which we call “The Lord’s Prayer”, Jesus shows how we can have an intimate time to talk with our Father.  But he clearly demonstrates for us that we need to be very specific in our prayers.  We can’t be like our little children who often start out a prayer life by simply uttering a catalogue of names and events and then asking God to “bless them”.  No, we need to be carefully and specifically mindful of what we are actually saying when we repeat the Lord’s Prayer:

  • Person: we must always remember to whom we are praying.  But also rejoice that even as we pray to God, we can call Him and pray to Him in the intimate of ways by saying, “Our Father…”
  • Perspective:  when we say “who is in Heaven; Hallowed be His name”, we perceive ourselves more accurately that we are just the creation, but He is pure and holy Creator God.
  • Presence: above all else, we want His Kingdom to come, for Scripture tells us in the book of Revelation that when Christ comes next time, it will be an everlasting presence of God among us.
  • Purpose:  But considering that not all things are rightly in tune with the Father here on earth, then is should be our passion to seek for people to come to God and follow Him and His ways.
  • Provision:  It is finally at this point, when we recognize and honor God and seek to help establish God’s kingdom here, then we have the right to come and ask God to meet our daily needs.
  • Pardon:  And the key to all of the above is that God forgave us our sins and allowed us to have a relationship with Him.  And in like manner, we are to pass on this forgiveness to all others.
  • Protection:  Then finally, we must pray for God to help us and protect us in the spiritual battle that we are engaged in with the author of our sin and our greatest enemy, Satan.
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This is quite the awesome prayer, isn’t it?  What’s truly amazing is how simple this prayer is in reality.  But I challenge you to follow the pattern of this prayer and to practice it, in the quiet part of your home and life, and see if you might just discover that the God of Miracles, and the God of Great Power is in fact still present with us today.  We simply need to unleash Him through our reverent and faithful prayers.

Remember the Good Moments

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Who Am I?  Part 15

Two weeks ago I made brief comments about how God provided for our needs, even if the situation was less than ideal.  One thing is for sure, God did take us out of a bad situation and He did provide a new setting where we could be a family and be active in ministry.  (You can read about the last chapter of my life story by clicking here.)

Unfortunately, it did not last a long time.  From the time I was interviewed until the time I left for Prince Edward Island driving another U-Haul truck was just less than two years.  On the one hand, I could say that it was a good thing, as moving to PEI ultimately led me to discover and join Pioneer Bible Translators.  On the other hand, I can look back with regret and consider this church experience as the next one of my great failures.

And yet, even as I say that, I know that neither statement is completely true nor completely false.  As is often the case, the truth is somewhere in the middle.  I do know that at the one year mark there was a Board meeting to decide if they would keep me on as the minister for another year.  The vote was “yes”, but it was not a majority vote.  Nine months later, I decided that this was not the place for me to stay.  So what really happened?

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The history of the church is a bit fuzzy now for me after all these years.  I can tell you that this church was built in the mid 1800s and was the first church of our movement to be built this far west in Canada (Manitoba was considered “Pioneer Country” at that time).  The stone work and the wood crafting was phenomenal, and it had an overarching balcony over the main sanctuary that allowed for a capacity of over 250 people.  It was considered a grand church in its day.

There had been some great preachers there over the years, but as is the case for most small towns, the number of attending members continued to decline over time.  By the time I came for my interview, the church had an average attendance of 25 people.  It was rather sad to see such a grand hall be so empty looking, not just during the week, but even on a Sunday morning.

When I was interviewed by the Search Committee, I expressed my desire to come and be a Preacher / Church Growth Evangelist.  It was very evident that the members of the committee were quite excited about this prospect.  They recommended me to the church at large, I preached on Sunday, and then flew back to Alberta to await their decision.  It came back within a few days – they voted unanimously to hire me.

And so in December of 1990, we arrived and stayed in one member’s house while they did the finishing touches to remodel the suite that took up most of the church balcony.  One month later, our second son Glen was born and we moved soon after that into the suite.  There is no doubt in my mind that Glen’s birth and then living as a foursome in the small but quaint balcony suite were the most positive aspects of life for us at that time.

It didn’t take long though to see that the energies I was attempting to pour into revitalizing the church were meeting some opposition within the small group.  Of the few families that were left, there was one “clan” still there who had some powerful people, at least in terms of their opinions.  I came to realize the truth of a saying that one of our Bible College teachers used to say, “The young are out to change the world; the old are out to change the young.”

Interestingly enough, it was the middle-aged clan members who showed resistance to trying new ideas and welcoming new people as I worked at growing the church.  In fact, the hand full of old singles ladies and I got along very well.  I recall with great fondness how I would hold my mid-week Bible studies, working our way from Genesis to Revelation, and it was the same 4 or 5 old ladies who would come out and catch my vision and passion for teaching God’s Word.

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I believe it was when I moved the piano to the side and introduced some choruses while playing my guitar that was the beginning of the end for me there.  The “power players” resigned from helping with worship, and the older people were not able to lead or assist.  And so I was left alone in that ministry.  Jill saw the end coming, and hung on with me for a number of months more.  It ended up that she moved with the kids first to PEI while I stayed to end my 2-year commitment to them.

In between the beginning and the end though, I do remember the family moments we had there.  And there were some young couples that we really bonded to while there.  And certainly our “Old Ladies Bible Study” held precious moments, and I still use some of those materials today.  I haven’t mentioned about the outreach I had with a friend in town for a year to young people at a  Christian drop-in center.  Some of those young people gave their lives to Christ.  How precious is that?

And so I have a choice.  I can remember this 2-year experience as one of my great failures, where not only did the church not grow, but a few years later had to close its doors.  Or I can remember the special intimate times I had with family, and with dear old saints, and with brand new young Christians.  So you tell me, what really happened there?  I may not have built up the church building in that town, but I do believe I helped build the Kingdom of God in the hearts of those people who mattered most to me.  That is what I will remember most.

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