Overcoming Discouragement By Our Faith – Pt. 3

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I ended the last article by saying, “It comes back to whether we really are trusting God to have the full control over our lives or not.”  This is perhaps the most difficult aspect of the Christian way of life for many believers today.  Our western culture has taught us how to be “independent”, “self-sufficient” and “successful”, which has at its core the fundamental belief that we can accomplish anything we want to in our own strength if we will put our minds to it.

The problem with this is that we usually leave God out of the situation, until something goes terribly wrong and then we look to God to “fix it”.  No wonder people today are over-worked, stressed out and living with high levels of anxiety, and/or guilt.  Mankind has never been able to control the world around him.  That was certainly true in past centuries, but even in our modern day we can never be fully prepared for the sudden loss of a loved one through death, an abrupt change in our economy, a fractured relationship with someone else we care about, or a myriad of other crises that can hit us at any time.

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It’s at this very point that we ought to be turning to God.  But this doesn’t mean that we are to look to God like He is a giant ‘band-aid” who treats our “owwies” when we feel hurt, or a genie in a bottle that will do anything we ask of him when we rub His magic lamp.  No, we are to come to God and trust that He really is the Author of all we can see, and that just as He takes good care to hold the Universe together, we trust that we can put our lives in His hands, and He will watch over our lives as well.

So when I feel discouraged in life and wonder what it is that I am doing now and what it is that I’m supposed to be doing, I remember the words of Psalm 119:105, “Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light for my path.”  Many Christians know this verse and understand that it is as we read the Bible and come to be more familiar with God’s Word that God will help to direct us in our daily lives.  That is exactly right, but there is so much more in this verse.

I’ve had the privilege to work for five years in a remote jungle area of Papua New Guinea.  It was during these years that I really truly understood the words of Psalm 119:05.  There were a number of times that I had to walk down a jungle trail after sunset and only had a small kerosene  oil lamp or a weak flashlight to light the path in front of me.  I literally could only see a few feet ahead of me, and even less could I see behind me.

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Try to imagine what that is like for a minute.  You are absolutely and totally surrounded by pitch black darkness.  If we put our lights or lamps out, I could not see my own hand even if I put it in front of my face.  So that small amount of light from my oil lamp or my mostly dead battery flashlight was my only hope for finding the path forward to take me back to my home village.

Now I could have let my fear of the dark, that fear of the unknown beyond my little cone of light, immobilize me there and stop me dead in my tracks.  All I really knew was that it was safe for about three feet in front of me.  I believed though, that there was a safe passage out there in that darkness ahead, even though I could not see it.  So what did I do?  I took one step forward.

And guess what I saw?  As I took a step forward, I was able to see a couple more feet in front of me.  It wasn’t much, but it was just enough to keep me safe from making a step in the wrong direction.  And every time I kept taking one step forward, I saw more of the path in front of me and the closer I knew I would be to my destination.

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That I believe is how we are to manage the decisions in our lives.  We are not God, and will never be able to see the “whole picture”.  But we almost always know and can see just enough ahead, that we can dare to take a step forward in one direction.  Psalm 119:105 tells us that it is God’s Word that will help reveal to us what steps and what direction to take.

Therefore, it is an act of faith for us to put our lives into God’s hands, trusting that He will guide us step-by-step that will help us to overcome the obstacles of life and to find the direction we need as we make our choices in life.  But remember too, that it is as we read and study God’s Word that we can best get our bearings in life and be steered clearly in making good and wise choices.

In further articles, I would like to share with you some of the decisions and cross-roads that I encountered as I grew up.  I can’t say that I always made the best decision.  But no decision can sometimes be worse than a bad decision.  At least we can try to learn something after making a bad decision.  Keep reading these articles then and see how my faith in God and my life decisions all turned out.  See you in the next article of this series.

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Overcoming Discouragement By Our Faith – Pt. 2

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“Would you be willing to share with us some of your story of the difficulties you had on the journey to PNG, the doubts or discouragements that came up in those years? How did you keep “the big picture” in view while being a pastor, a youth leader, a “regular employee”, a student for years in different cities? How did you deal with having that dream interrupted when you came back to Canada?”

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This paragraph was posted on the top of Part 1 of this short series on “Overcoming Discouragement By Our Faith.”  It would be wonderful if I could just say to others who are facing disappointments and discouragements in life to “just believe”, and have everything turn out alright.  But I have lived long enough and been through enough experiences of life to know that everything does not always work out alright, or should I say, the way we had first wanted things to turn out.

And even as I say that, I think I am partly able to answer the questions being asked above.  There is nothing wrong with a person having a dream of how their life will turn out.  I believe that we were built this way, and part of us dies when we allow our dreams to die.  There is a verse in the Bible that I think is helpful, but can be misunderstood.  Proverbs 29:18a says, “Where there is no vision, the people perish.” (King James Version)

Some speakers have made a lot out of this verse.  They will say, “You need to have a BIG idea.  You need to have a “dream” for your life.  You need to have a goal, a sense of purpose, something that will be your driving force.  And if you don’t have that, then your life will be doomed for failure.  So figure out what you want to do with your life and get out there and do it.

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Now I suppose I am over dramatizing this viewpoint a bit, but maybe not for some people.  I do think there are some young people out there today who think that if they don’t have the direction and the vocation of their life figured out by the time they are 24, then there is something wrong with them and they will probably end up wandering aimlessly about in life.

First of all, let me correct the idea above of what Proverbs 29:18 actually says.  To do this, it would be best for me to show how other English translations of this verse have handled the Hebrew.  Compare the following:

NIV:  “Where there is no revelation, the people cast off restraint; but blessed is he who keeps the law.

TEV:  “A nation without God’s guidance is a nation without order. Happy are those who keep God’s law!

NLT:  “When people do not accept divine guidance, they run wild. But whoever obeys the law is happy.

It is not hard now to see the common thread here.  Whenever people are unwilling to look to God and listen to His divine guidance for their lives, that is when they will run into all kinds of problems in life and end up running around aimlessly, and without purpose and meaning.  To counter this, one needs to get into God’s Law (the Bible) and see what He has to say about how to live one’s life.

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Therefore, when I say “have faith” and mean by this that things will turn our alright, we need to define what (or whom) we have faith in.  Proverbs 3:5-6 helps us to properly define the content or object of our faith.  It says, “Trust in the LORD with all your heart; do not depend on your own understanding.  Seek his will in all you do, and he will direct your paths.

So it really is not left up to us to have to “figure it all out” when we are young.  If we have made the decision to trust God with our lives, then the Bible tells us that He will help us by directing us in making these important decisions of life.  We have to get this one thing straight first, who is really in control of our lives, us… or God?

If the answer is God, then we can properly understand and be encouraged by a couple of other key Bible verses.  Take Psalms 37:4 for one, “Take delight in the LORD, and he will give you your heart’s desires.”   When God is truly first in our lives, then we will be so in tune with God that His desires will become our desires, and God will inevitably fulfill the desires of our hearts, for they are the same as His.  This protects us from the danger of reading into this verse that God is obligated to give us whatever selfish desires we may have in our hearts.

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This leads us to one final verse that I want to look at in this article.  Romans 8:28 says, “And we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them.”  This is such a powerful verse, and I think one of the verses of the Bible that helps me the most to be able to deal with disappointments and discouragements in life.

There is no question that bad things do happen in life, and that not everything works out exactly the way we had hoped.  Sometimes, not even close to what we hoped for.  But God is promising us in this verse that He can take any situation in life, no matter how bad, and bring good out of that situation.  It comes back to whether we really are trusting God to have the full control over our lives or not.  More on this in the next article.

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The Christmas Story Is Needed In Africa

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Light of the World

Do you ever imagine what it would have been like to be there when Jesus was born? What would it have been like to hear Gabriel explain to Mary what was going to happen to her; to hear Joseph explain what the angel told him in his dreams; to be with the shepherds in the field? What would it have been like to know that the Messiah was coming, but not know how or when? It’s hard for us to imagine since most of us were born into a world where Jesus came a long time ago.

It is not nearly as hard to imagine if you live where we live in Africa. The “world” our neighbors live in is essentially a pre-Jesus world. One could say the Light of the World has not been seen here yet. The evidence is everywhere…

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I just talked to a neighbor on my porch. He came with his toddler son. I could see amulets on the child, to protect him from the spirits or jinn. All the children here wear them. A “powerful” one can cost as much as enough rice to feed a family for a month. But because they are afraid, they find the money somehow. I wonder what they think when they see our children not wearing them.

I have another friend who lives in a village nearby. One day he told me the story of how his village was founded by his great-grandfather, a man said to have the ability to see and talk to jinn. When he first came to the area and recognized its agricultural potential, he could also see the many spirits all around.

They did not want to leave, but he was able to negotiate a deal with them specific to his family and not others – a covenant sealed with the sacrifice of nine rams. As he told me the stories, I couldn’t help compare his covenant, made by his grandfather and sealed with ram’s blood, with our covenant, made by Jesus and sealed with His own blood.

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And then there is Mariama. Her father brought her to us several months ago. She was suffering from all sorts of physical ailments and couldn’t sleep due to scary voices she attributed to jinn. We prayed for her and gave her a copy of Matthew in her language. We heard no more until her father sought me out again.

He doesn’t know what to think about us Jesus-followers, but he does know the spirits don’t bother us. He had taken her to various healers, but nothing helped. She looked much worse than when we’d last seen her, utterly dominated by unclean and evil forces quite beyond her ability to resist. Her face was the picture of absolute hopelessness. I’ll never forget it.

I wonder how many like Mariama lived in Palestine before Jesus came. The Scriptures say that people were astonished to see evil spirits obey Jesus and His disciples. In their “pre-Jesus” world, did they have any idea that someday they would be delivered from darkness through the blood of the Lamb of God?

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As you celebrate Jesus coming to Bethlehem this Christmas, remember those whose eyes are not yet opened to the Light of the World and pray they come to know Him! On behalf of Pioneer Bible Translators, we thank you for your prayers and financial support.

Come quickly, Lord.

Used by permission from Pioneer Bible Translator’s monthly eNewsletter.  If you would like to receive this monthly newsletter, click on this link “PBT eNewsletter” and subscribe to it.

Heading Overseas To Be Missionaries – Pt. 2

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Our First Week in France – Pt. 1

In last week’s article, we caught a glimpse of the heart of a missionary wife and mother, just before they headed overseas to France where they all would concentrate on learning French.  This was an important step for them to become much more proficient in French before they would go next to West Africa and minister there where most people are bilingual in French, the official language.

In the first two weeks that this missionary family spent in a small rural town in France, all of them had some interesting and often demanding experiences.  I’m sure that the leaders and experienced field personnel from our mission were careful to teach them what kind of things to expect when they would get to Africa, and to be prepared for the culture shock that would happen once they got there.

What they may not have been prepared for was the initial stages of being enamoured by the differences they found in France, followed by shock and frustration that comes when they realized that that was not their home.  Familiar activities that would normally be quite easy, could suddenly become very difficult and frustrating when they didn’t work the same way.  Then add to that the language barriers, which can get anyone discouraged and frustrated.

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Thankfully, God built most of us to be somewhat in awe, filled with excitement when we first get to our new environment.  This is called the “Honeymoon Stage”, where everything is just so fascinating because things are both different and interesting from what we are used to.  God also has designed us to be flexible and learn how to adapt quickly to new situations that occur in new environments.

That is what I would like to do now, in this article and one more, is to see the interesting differences of life in another country seen through the eyes of a new missionary family.  The wife kept a kind of journal, which she would then email back to her family and friends over here.  She has given me permission to put out excerpts from her notes.  I hope you will find some of the things she writes as interesting to you as they were to me when I first read it.

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Let’s get started, and I think the easiest way to do this is to focus in on some of the main topics which she wrote about:

Traveling & Jet Lag

Our flight was uneventful and we were actually able to get a little sleep in preparation for our 8am arrival in Paris.  Since we had 6 hrs between flight and train, we didn’t feel at all rushed even with the transportation strike.  And the luggage carts are free at Charles de Gaul!  We blessed our French professor many times yesterday!  The kids did great too!

[Note:  most missionaries now will tell you the best flight you can have is an “uneventful one”.]

Many, many trains were cancelled because of the strikes, but ours went right on!  Thanks for praying because it truly was a miracle – the folks in Mours St Eusebe (our town) were told it was supposed to be cancelled.

[Note:  when a missionary first arrives in a non-Western, developing country, we’ve heard enough stories to know to expect things not to go smoothly, especially in the area of transportation and logistics.  But note how this family arrived right in the middle of a transportation strike in France.  So no matter where we travel as missionaries, we always need to keep up our prayer support to cover us for whatever lies ahead.]

On Day 1, she wrote, “After a brief time up around 2:30 this morning, we slept until noon!  Jet lag must be gotten through. 

On Day 2, she wrote, “The whole family was up at inappropriate times last night from jet lag.  Tonight we will try Tylenol PM.  We did get up at 8am though.

And on Day 5, “Have had a rough couple of days/nights.  Jet lag isn’t our favorite.  We were up at seven-ish this morning though so hopefully we can make it through the whole day awake.

And for Day 6, “The girls are the first ones to sleep completely through the night!  Progress has been made!  Our son got up for some decongestant last night but was able to go right back to sleep.  The two of us are still struggling but will get there.

[Then, after Day 6, jet lag and poor sleep is not mentioned very much again.  One conclusion: tough times (like no sleep) can hit us hard, but they only last (usually) a short time.  Trust God to carry you through tough times, and know that better days lie ahead.]

Be Careful At First

We will plunge into our new community and language learning this afternoon.  One thing we were advised was to just tell our neighbors we are here to learn French and not to mention being missionaries right away.  He said people will put you in a category that might hinder the relationship if you tell them right away that you are an evangelical Christian. 

A few days later:

On the way to Bingo, a lady was parking her car near our house.  Since it was raining, I offered to share my umbrella.  We chatted about many things.  Of course, our work in Africa came up.  I tried real hard to dodge the “what will you do” question in accordance with the advice given to us.  But she wheedled it out of me.  She said she was Catholic when she was young but now she was nothing because (here she paused for a long while and I inserted, “La vie est difficile? (Life is difficult)” to which she nodded her head yes). 

[I would agree that we should be cautious at first in new situations with new people.  But we must also be sensitive to the hurts and needs of others so that at any time we might be there to offer words of hope and encouragement.]

Tune in next week for Part 3.

Max Lucado’s Newest Book

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“God’s Story, Your Story”

This is the title to one of Max Lucado’s newest books. I’m really excited about this book. As many of you know, all through 2011, I wrote articles on a book called “Walking With God on the Road You Never Wanted to Travel” by Mark Atteberry (click here to access this series). That book has had such a positive impact in my life seeing as I have been living with my muscle disease for four years now. Reading Atteberry’s book gave me the hope and encouragement I needed to be able to walk along this difficult path.

As we came to November last year, I could see that we were nearing the end of writing articles on that book. I wondered what new book I could start to write articles about that met me where I was at in life, plus would be an encouraging book for all of my readers. My wife was the first one to mention Max Lucado’s new book to me. I went online to check it out and immediately I felt a connection to it. Even by just reading the Introduction of the book, I felt certain that this would be an excellent book to read and to write about.

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Let me give you a little more background on my life journey. Then I will tell you why I am excited about exploring Lucado’s book with all of you here on my blog site. Very briefly, I have had the privilege to serve God in quite a variety of missionary and pastoral ministries for over thirty years now. By the time I was 47 years old, I had visited 27 countries and set foot on every continent except Antarctica. (And no, I don’t have a desire to go there.)

Then suddenly in 2008, my muscle disease hit me like a freight train that stopped me dead in my tracks. I had just returned from a very active translation consultant project in Papua New Guinea. Days after getting back to Canada, a few troubling aches and pains flared up over the following six weeks to the point that I was barely able to walk across my living room floor.

Needless to say, the following months, which turned into years, were filled with pain, fatigue, frustration, discouragement and even depression. The turning point came when I participated in a six-week small-group study on learning how to deal with chronic pain. It was at that group that I was introduced to Atteberry’s book. And those two things helped me so much to pull out of my deep despair.

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Lately, I really believe that I have learned how to manage myself well physically by adapting my environment and staying within good boundaries. And I’m also doing quite well emotionally and spiritually. I believe I have for the most part, come out of my wilderness experience and am much more ready to start figuring out how my life will look in the future. I am at the place where I want to see how my life and my illness fit into God’s grand scheme of things.

And that is where Max Lucado’s book comes in. I believe it is time to try once more to see what the bigger picture is, and to do my part that God has designed me for. Actually, I know there are many people who would like to explore this important question. Lucado points this out himself on page 22 in his introductory chapter. He says:

We need to know where we came from. Knowing connects us, links us, bonds us to something greater than we are. Knowing reminds us that we aren’t floating on isolated ponds but on a grand River.

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It is well-known that Lucado is one of today’s most popular Christian authors. In 25 years of writing, he has authored more than sixty books and other various print items. I think what makes him such a good author is how he can creatively weave the story in a simple and humorous manner. But within each story lies a deeper story. And so what makes us laugh and cry from what he writes often softens us and prepares us to hear the deeper spiritual truths he wants us to really hear.

And that is exactly the point of this new book. Lucado knows that as much as we often think our life story is the main story for each one of us, the truth is that our stories are all just a small part of a much bigger Story. And it is when we can get a good grasp on the bigger picture, God’s Story, that we can finally start to make sense of our own lives within the bigger picture. Thus the title, “God’s Story, Your Story.”

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Let me close this article with a quote from page 25 where Lucado briefly touches on the purpose of him writing this new book:

Can you find the plot of a book in one paragraph or hear the flow of a symphony in one measure? Can you uncover the plot of your life by examining your life? By no means. You are so much more than a few days between the womb and the tomb. Your story indwells God’s. This is the great promise of the Bible and the hope of this book.

My hope is that I will do a good job this year as I write an article every second Saturday. And I hope you will enjoy what I write, but also that my articles will help deepen your faith in God. I look forward to the year that lies ahead of us.

[God’s Story, Your Story] Max Lucado.  Copyright [Thomas Nelson Publishers, 2011]  Used by permission.

Follow Where God Leads – Pt. 1

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Bugs Bunny & Tweety Show Intro

Yes, that’s right.  I’m going to start this article which is a continuation of our “Hard Road Journey” series with the famous Warner Bros. 1961 song that would start the Bugs Bunny & Tweety Hour show every Saturday.  (I loved that show.)  Read the words for fun the first time (and hum the tune if you know it, or look it up on You Tube).  Then read them again and see what words of wisdom are contained in the lyrics:

Overture, curtain, lights
This is it, the night of nights
No more rehearsing and nursing a part
We know every part by heart

Overture, curtains, lights
This is it, we’ll hit the heights
And oh what heights we’ll hit
On with the show this is it

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So here we are, ten months later, and still talking about walking through difficult wilderness experiences.  We have been following the story of the nation of Israel as they walked through the desert for 40 years and learned from their experiences as highlighted and taught by Mark Atteberry in his book, “Walking With God on the Road You Never Wanted to Travel“.

Can you imagine what it would have been like to be one of the Israelite children growing up and wandering around in the desert for 40 years?  Now I’m sure that they would have camped out in some spots for long stretches of time, and had found some oases to enjoy along the way.  (Read the article on “Oases“.)  But it must have been nearly unbearable to hear the stories of how they failed as a nation to enter the Promised Land once, and were still yearning for the next opportunity to come.

And then suddenly, 77 chapters later (from Exodus 13 to Numbers 33) and 40 years after they had left Egypt, they finally camped beside the River Jordan and were able to see across to the other side where God was leading them, the Promised Land of Canaan.  A land that was said to be “flowing in milk and honey”.  But one that also still contained great walled cities and those nasty giants (over 7 ft tall) called the Anakites.

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And this became the great moment of decision once again for the Israelite people.  Did they dare to believe that this was the moment they had all been waiting for.  Just like the lyrics up above, the people had been rehearsing for 40 years to be ready to answer to God when He called on them to act in faith, to follow Him, and to take the precious gift of that abundant land that He had always promised He would give them.

And this is the point to which we have come in Atteberry’s book.  Mark has been encouraging us in his previous eleven chapters on how to walk through the dark valleys of our life experiences, and hang on to the hope that one day, God would bring us out of the wilderness experience.  And when that happens, we are encouraged to not falter in our faith and fail to take hold of what God has placed in front of us.  Hear what Atteberry says on this important point:

When God brings you to the edge of your wilderness and offers you a way out, take it.  Don’t allow fear to paralyze you, which is what the Israelites did the first time around and what a lot of people do today.                                           (page 148)

I believe what can so easily happen to us is that we look back on the previous disappointments and disasters of our lives which resulted in such emotional and psychological pain that we are too afraid to even try to improve our lives.  And Atteberry recognizes this as he does not suggest that we just run forward and throw caution to the wind to grasp at what could be a better life.

Rather, he does suggest that we exercise some wisdom and discretion, even as we push forward to leave our desert experience and follow God into whatever new and wonderful experience He may have in store for us.  In fact, when something looks almost too good to be true, that just might be the case.  But then again, maybe not.

So Atteberry advises us to ask three important questions which will help us to know if this new and wonderful opportunity in life is in fact what we ought to do.  And they are:

Question 1: Having studied, what is my Bible telling me?
Question 2: Having prayed, what is the Spirit telling me?
Question 3: Having listened, what are my friends telling me?

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These are excellent questions to ask when trying to determine God’s will for you in any given moment when you need to make a decision.  We first need to determine if this “better life” that we are pursuing after is in any way going to compromise or hinder our relationship with God.  Then we need to allow time for God’s Spirit to speak to our spirit about this, and confirmation of a good decision should always be accompanied by the inner peace that only God can give.

Finally, since we do not live in a vacuum, or on an island as they would say, we should always try to consult others who may be affected by this decision.  And seeking out wise advice from godly people will often help us to gain a perspective that we may not have had otherwise.

But then it ultimately comes down to us.  At the end of the day, we will need to make a decision.  And if we have followed through on Atteberry’s three questions and found the answer is yes, then we need to boldly go forward into whatever lies ahead.  Now Atteberry has two more key thoughts to consider as we go forward, and they will be the body of my next article.  I’ll see you then.

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Pursue Your Dreams For God

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Keep Your Dreams Alive – Part 2

“Right now, you must understand that the distance between you and the fulfillment of your dream can grow a little smaller every day if you keep taking steps in the right direction.  You may not be able to take big steps.  Indeed, the hard road you’re traveling may make even the smallest steps very difficult.  But if even a little progress can be made, make it.”  (pg. 154 from “Walking With God on the Road You Never Wanted to Travel” by Mark Atteberry)

In Part 1 of this two-part article, I shared some details about the struggles and disappointments each of us within my family has had in these past three years to experience the fulfillment of our personal dreams and hopes in life.  At the conclusion of this article I have some good news.  But I would guess that some of you who are reading this are still walking along on a dark and difficult road and are not seeing your dreams fulfilled.  I believe that Atteberry has some good advice for all of us.  He offers three suggestions as to how we can keep our dreams alive.

1  Keep Talking About Your Dream

I believe that God is our Creator.  He created each one of us to be uniquely different.  Just look around and you will know that this is true.  The Psalmist says that God knew us and was uniquely forming us from the time of our conception in our mother’s womb.  (Psalm 139:13)  And part of this unique individuality He created involves our personality, our interests, our desires, our hopes and our dreams.  These are all a part of what makes us who we are.

Accepting that as a given, we should also accept that we would naturally want to speak out about these interests and dreams that we have to other people.  In fact, I believe that when a person truly discovers what dreams they have for life, they will feel so passionate about these dreams that they won’t be able to contain them and keep them secret. but will constantly be telling others about what they hope to accomplish in life.

And that is as it should be.  Sometimes we may not clearly know how to fulfill these dreams, but just by talking to others will help us to clarify the dreams and what steps we need to take to accomplish them.  And don’t worry about negative or pessimistic people who for whatever reason are constantly shooting our ideas and dreams down.  There will always be people like this around.  Even if you are not seeing the realization of your dreams now, as Atteberry says, just talking about your dreams will help keep them alive.

2.  Keep Praying About Your Dreams

Not only should we be talking to others about our dreams, but we need to constantly be talking with God about our hopes and aspirations in life.  Notice how I said we need to talk “with God”, not “to God”.  Too often we make our plans and goals in life and then we ask God to bless all that we do.  But in Proverbs 16:9 it says, “man plans his steps, but the Lord directs his path.”  When we pray, it is important to talk over our hopes and plans with God, but it is even more important to be listening to the leading and guiding of the Holy Spirit.

When life is difficult though, and things don’t seem to be turning out like we had always dreamt and hoped they would, Atteberry advises us to pray to God in two very specific ways.  First, as we go through a difficult period, he advises us to pray and ask God for strength to endure the hardships we are experiencing.  And secondly, he tells us to ask God to still bless our dreams and make them a reality.  What is amazing is the fact that God does want to bless us and give us these good things.  And more often than not, as Scripture says, we have not because we ask not.  (James 4:2)

3.  Keep Moving Toward Your Dream.

Now after all this good advice, there remains just one more thing to do: find out what you can do, even little things, and go out and keep pursuing your dreams.  You may feel like it is hopeless, or that it will take forever to get to where you want.  But remember the famous saying of, “How do you conquer the mountain?” Answer: “One step at a time.

In a previous article I share how my one son waited and pursued after his desire to be in the Army.  It seemed like every time he talked with the recruitment office they told him to fill out another application, or some new form.  He could have given up.  But he dutifully filled out each form.  And he called back once or twice every week for a few months.  And guess where he is now?  After a two-year waiting period, right now he is in Quebec just about to finish the first month of his Army Boot Camp training.

For me too it has been a long, slow process to get to where I am now today.  Three years ago, I thought my missionary career was over when the full force of my muscle disease hit me.  But in time, by some trial and error of different medications, and by continually adjusting my environment around me to make me comfortable, it has become possible for me to continue doing my Bible translation work.

And so what about you?  What obstacles are standing in your way.  Jesus said metaphorically that even with tiny mustard seed faith we can conquer mountains that stand in our way.  You have to believe first that your dreams and aspirations have come from God.  Then believe that He can empower you to get to your goal.  And then finally, we all just need to take a step forward and start walking towards our dreams.

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