Cool Computer Programs for Bible Translation

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Technology & Bible Translation

The first really cool peek for me into the emerging technology for Bible translators happened in 1994.  I had seen a little bit of the old program called “Shoebox” where linguists and translators would store their language data and enter their vernacular text which could then be interlinearized to have English gloss words under the vernacular text once you had a good amount of words entered into their dictionary file.

Let me pause here before going on and tell you why this linguistic computer program was called “Shoebox”.  Think back to the time before computers.  (If you can do that easily, you are my age or older, but if this is hard for you, then you are definitely part of the younger generation.)  😛  Now imagine that you have been doing language learning for a few years in a remote part of the world.

What would you do to help you keep your data all organized?  Even to divide words into basic verbs, nouns, adjectives and adverbs.  Well, the pioneers of Bible translation actually did use the old file card system and would put one word, and its description/definition, on to one card, and then “file” it in long shoeboxes to be retrieved later when needed.  (Some translators would have piles of shoeboxes in their houses full of words and linguistic notes in the early days.)

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Thank goodness for the advent of the computer.  Now we no longer need to put all of our research into old musty shoeboxes.  And we no longer need to fear that our work will all go up in smoke if the house burned down or would get all chewed up, by all the cockroaches in our village houses.  Though we do need to worry about hard drives crashing, and wondering where we put that information in the thousands of files on our hard drive.

But back to where I started.  “Shoebox” was very handy for us to organize our linguistic data and do basic translation work.  In 1994, when I was at a training week of orientation for Pioneer Bible Translators, I was introduced to the neatest, most cool and intuitive linguistic program at that time which was called “Lingua-links”.  It could add words, analyze words, interlinearize words, and so much more with just a click of a button.

When I was able to tell Jill later about this, I summed it up by saying, “That was SO AWESOME!”  Very professional, wouldn’t you say?  I think that is when I knew for sure that I wanted to be a Bible translator, because I would be allowed to buy the best model of computer out there, and make it perform some awesome linguistic feats, and be able to call it “work”.  I was in love!!  😀

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In the past decade, there continues to be great advances made in the area of marrying linguistics together with computer technology.  There were a number of versions of Lingua-links over the years, each being able to do more than the last version.  But the basic ideas remained the same.  And then came along a program called “Paratext”.

When I first heard about Paratext, I thought that it was just another program that was doing pretty much the same things I was already doing.  I was wrong.  It did still have much (and even more) of the computing power of the old programs.  One common feature with modern linguistic programs is the ability to open a large number of windows within the main window.  Here, let me show you what I mean:

Paratext Windows (800x450)

 Going from top left down and then middle top to bottom and right side top to bottom, I have these windows to work with just in this one program:
  1. My Hebrew text in which I can add notes.
  2. The Hebrew/English interlinear text.  I can add rows within this to give me the lemmas, the transliteration, and the parsing of the Hebrew words.  All of these are hyperlinked to one or more Hebrew Lexicon and Dictionary.
  3. A text comparison of a variety of English versions.
  4. A Key Term rendering window which will grab specialized biblical terms and show you the equivalent vernacular term which will add up over time to become your “Key Term List”
  5. A rendering tool based off of algorithms of the Greek and English text and looking into the vernacular text to produce a computer generated guessing and interlinearization of the vernacular to English.
  6. The “Back Translation” of the vernacular text.  We want a reverse translation from the translated local language back into a fairly literal English version of their text.  I use this the most to judge if something is missing, added or wrong in their translation.
  7. Peeking out at the top right is the Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew Lexicon.
  8. The NIV larger window box.
  9. Finally, the actual vernacular translation that I am checking.

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What was really exciting though about Paratext was that you did not just work on this project by yourself in your local village any more.  Of course you want to save to your local hard drive as you go along.  But Paratext is part of the global work of United Bible Societies and many other linguistic organizations who share their project information and their translations with others around the world.

So when you do an “Internet Server” back up of your work, it sends the data to the Paratext server on the other side of the world, and can be made accessible to anyone else who has been approved to work on the translation.  So we have literally gone from doing local translation projects to doing global translation projects.

There is so much more I’d like to tell you about this, but that will have to wait until the next article.  I hope that some of you who have read this have found this very interesting.  And who knows, maybe you’ll fall in love with what I am showing you, just like I did so many years ago with the joining of technology and linguistics.

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God’s Plans Are Bigger Than Ours

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Our Tour of Churches in Illinois

Two months ago, an idea came to me that it would be good to visit one of our supporting churches in Illinois.  What I mean by “supporting churches” is that the mission work that Jill and I do for Pioneer Bible Translators (PBT) is supported financially by the donations that come in from churches and individuals who believe in the importance of the work we do.

The primary goal of PBT is to “transform lives through the translated Word of God”.  We believe that everyone has the right to read the Bible and learn about God and His Son, Jesus Christ in their own language.  But of the 6,900+ languages that exist in the world today, there are still over 2,200 languages that do not even have one verse of Scripture in their own language.

We strive then to make God’s Word available to these Bible-less people groups around the world.  In Papua New Guinea, where Jill and I have done most of our work, there are approximately 870 languages, and many of them do not have any portion of the Bible.  In fact, many of them do not even have a written alphabet.  It is up us as linguists to listen to their speech and create an alphabet based on what we hear.

Monolingual Approach

Above you can see me as I presented to a congregation in Pleasant Hill, Illinois, a demonstration that we call the “Monolingual Approach”.  What happens is that I will speak my village language that I learned in PNG, and an assistant will work with me who speaks another language besides English.  I have to draw out from my assistant words and phrases in their language by only using gestures or pointing at objects.

As my assistant speaks in the other language (and this time is was in Colombian Spanish), I write down everything I can in phonetic symbols.  After about twenty minutes of pantomiming and pointing at things, I have a chalk board full of words and phrases.  And from that, I can begin to construct a preliminary alphabet, and I begin to make some grammatical observations of  the language.

I have done this demonstration about 10 times now.  I’ve worked with assistants from various parts of Africa, as well as some who spoke Spanish or French.  And in 20 minutes, many people are quite amazed at how much information I have gathered and what I can say in repeating their language.  One time, after working with an African student, at the end of the seminary class he ran into the hallway and declared to a friend, “This man knows how to speak my language!”

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Now back to the story about me visiting a church in Illinois.  Two months ago, one small church in Illinois decided to send in a large donation.  Wow!  Praise God!  Now how could I adequately say “Thank you,” to them.  I realized that I would be down in Dallas for two months to do the preparation work for the upcoming trip to Papua New Guinea, and thought that it would not be too hard to jump on a plane and go visit this church in Chicago.

So I contacted the pastor of the church, and he thought it would be a great idea for me to come just after Thanksgiving and to preach about and present our work of Bible translation.  That sounds great, but then I wondered where I would stay for a few days after flying to Chicago and how I could get to the church, since my muscle condition prevents me from driving long distance.

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That’s when I remembered that I have a friend named Christian (what a fabulous name), who lives in a northwest suburb of Chicago.  I phoned him and asked if he thought it would be possible for him to help me with a place to stay and to be my driver.  Praise God, he was more than willing to help out.  He told me that he would do whatever I needed help with seeing as he is self-employed.

Then I asked him if it would be okay to visit more than one church, if they responded favorably to me coming to visit them.  Well, can you guess what happened?  That’s right, God had plans so much bigger than mine.  In eight days, I ended up speaking in three churches and in three small group gatherings.  They were all so eager to here more about this ministry of Bible translation.

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What is truly amazing is the interest in our work that came from a small country church all the way across the state, five hours drive from Chicago, that is near Hannibal, Missouri and is almost beside the Mississippi River.  They read one of my emails out loud to the whole congregation that I had sent to the church asking if I could come and preach and present our work.

When I heard back from the woman who is helping to do the admin work of the church, she said, “Everyone is so excited to hear that you are going to come.”  And then she prepared an article for the local newspaper to let the whole community around the church to know that I was going to come.  It was very cool to see it on their front page of the paper. Below is the copy of the newspaper article.  And all I can say is, “Thank you God for expanding the opportunities to speak for you.  And thank you to all who support this ministry work.”

Norm NewsPaper

* If you would like to know more about how you can pray for this work or to help support this work financially, please send me an email at norm.weatherhead@gmail.com .

* You could also follow me on Twitter or on Facebook.

Our God Is In Control Of Everything

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[Editor’s Note: My friend who wrote this following article works with Pioneer Bible Translators in a sensitive area in Southeast Asia.  We need to uphold him and other Christians in prayer as they seek to get God’s Word out to the people in their mother-tongue languages.]

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One of the greatest things about working in a new field is that you get to see God open doors and solve problems firsthand. Sometimes we get a glimpse into the intricate ways that He “makes your ways straight” long before we even knew we would need His help.

For the past couple of years, we have been trying to start a translation project with a tribe that my parents and grandparents worked among in the last century. Let’s call them the Bimble tribe for now. They live in the North-eastern part of South Asia and have no translation in their own language, but they are very eager to have one.

Last time I visited, we were able to convince the churches in the area to listen to us and consider giving us permission to do translation work in the Bimble language. So now I left to go see all the Bodies in the area and collect their decision to allow us to work or not. When I arrived and contacted the Church of God (Anderson) elders, they were delighted that I had returned to their area and came to visit me the same day with papers granting me permission and promising help in anyway possible from their Body. It seems they had been waiting for me return for quite a while.

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I was travelling with a friend of my father and bolstered by this wonderful news, we went to meet the head of the CNI Body in town. It was a good thing we did. He was leaving town for a meeting and would not be back till the end of the week. He regretted that he would not be able to type up the permission letter but told me to make one and he would sign it. At which point, I went from being worried to being delighted.

It is always nice to be able to make people say exactly what you want them to but I made sure he saw my draft before I left that night. He also asked me to redo his letterhead while I was at it and promised to sign it as soon as he got back.  The only scary part was that he planned to return the night before I had to fly out and any delay would ruin this plan.

And sure enough, the Adversary was up to his tricks and the next morning there was a bandh. This is a forced political closure of all roads and businesses, like a strike of everything, and was started by the opposition parties and some rebel groups. Needless to say, I was a little worried. The bandh lasted right up until my last full day in town so there was very little I could do except pray that the people I needed to see would be able to return to town and would have time for me to see them.

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On that last day, we rushed to see the head of the Presbyterian Body since they are the largest in the area and we had to have their acceptance in order to succeed. We did this putting our faith in God because due to the bandh we had not been able to make an appointment or anything like that.

When we arrived, there was no one around. The leaders were all in a meeting of the council that runs the Presbyterian Body. We decided to wait anyway, praying that God would give us an opportunity to meet the leaders. After a long time, we became a bit discouraged and decided to see if there was anyone else there at all.

We walked into the only other office with people and met the vice-head of the Body. He listened to what we had to say and was sceptical at first but soon his attitude changed. He became enthusiastic about our plans to translate the Word into Bimble. He became so interested that he decided that he would take us to the Head of the Body and make sure we got an appointment with both him and the chairman of the Council.

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When they arrived, we went in and were introduced to the chairman and to the Head of the Presbyterian Body. However things started to do downhill from there. The Head changed his mind and objected. He told us that there is no need to do a translation in Bimble and that they could not give us permission. But, as seems to be the case whenever things get out of hand, the Tetragrammaton (LORD God) intervened.

The Chairman remembered that my father’s friend had performed his sister’s wedding (full blown weddings are a bit rare and are very grand, so doing one is considered an honour) and he started listening very carefully. Eventually, when we explained our idea of doing an oral translation he decided that it might be a good idea. And within seconds, the Head of the Presbyterian Body followed suit. We got our permission verbally and they even promised to support us if any of their people had questions.

That same night the Head of the CNI was able to sneak into town on the last bus and we were able to get to his house even though there was a lockdown on the streets to stop people from rioting. It helps that we were driving an ambulance. 🙂 He signed the paper and offered his personal support. It just goes to show that no matter what happens — strikes, bandhs, riots, or lockdowns— The Tetragrammaton is really the one in charge of everything.

Taking A Look At Bible Translation

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Special Bible Translation Videos

In many of my articles over the past two years, I have tried to explain what is involved in doing Bible translation work.  Explaining the process of translation, starting with a rough draft and then the numerous checking stages after that, can be done in words.  But as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words.  And so that is what I will do for this article, provide you with some links to see some video clips that demonstrate and explain the ministry of Bible translation.

Last week, and on the very same day, two short videos were released online.  The first one, produced by Wycliffe Bible Translators, does an excellent job illustrating the stages and the challenges of Bible translation work.  Take a look at this video clip using a fictional language from Asia:

The Bible Translation Process

Now that you have a little taste of what it takes to translate the Bible into another language and culture of the world, you will want to take a look at this next video.  This video clip was just produced by our mission group, Pioneer Bible Translators, and it helps us to see the bigger global picture of Bible translation.  We know that God sent His Son, Jesus, to be the Savior of the whole world.  But there are still over 2,200 languages in the world that do not have even one verse of Scripture in their language.

Watch this next video clip and try to gain a new perspective on what needs to be done in world missions:

Answer The Call

Now that you have seen these two quick video clips, I want to invite you to view a message that I preached to some churches in eastern Canada a few weeks ago.  I was invited to share about the ministry of Bible translation, which I am always happy to do.  In my message, I outline “The Task”, “The Challenges” and “The Vision” of Bible translation.  The message is about 40 minutes long, so I would like to invite you to sit back now (or at a later time) and catch the vision of what God is doing in the world.

Here is the link to the video message I delivered:

Catch The Vision

I hope you have enjoyed watching these videos as much as I have enjoyed preparing this article and spreading the word of what God is doing through ordinary people like you and me to take God’s Word to the ends of the earth.

Mission Internship In Papua New Guinea

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Through The Eyes of a New Missionary

Pioneer Bible Translators is growing rapidly in the number of career missionaries.  There is still such a big job out there to try to start language projects in every language group of the world that needs a translation.  One of the ways in which we are proactive in the area of recruitment, is to have young people go to the mission field for a summer experience.  Below is a letter from our of our 2012 interns to Papua New Guinea.  Catch the excitement as she shares about her first-time experience to PNG.

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I am currently having a splendid time on the other side of the world and have added a new location to the places I consider home.  After finishing the two weeks of training in Texas and saying goodbye to my other intern friends who went to another country, our group of three successfully completed the 50 hours of travel, making several tight connections and arriving safely in Madang with our luggage!  We spent one full day in the city before catching a small MAF mission plane and went out to a remote village.

The missionary who lead our excursion grew up in this village while her parents worked on translating the Bible into the language of the people.  She works in the PBT (Pioneer Bible Translators) office in Madang, so going back to the village, for her, was really like going home. Not only did the people welcome her as their family but they also welcomed us.  We were so well loved by the people; they took us in and treated us like family and it was wonderful.

This village is so beautiful and is built right on a spectacular river.  The landscape is dotted with coconut palms and fruit trees and picturesque thatched houses.  We were constantly surrounded by breathtaking views. It was so beautiful; we basically lived in a postcard for two weeks.  We stayed in the missionary house,  which is in the middle of the village. 

 

Our primary task was language learning, so on a typical day, we would go to one of the neighboring houses and do whatever the people were doing and try to pick up as much Tok Pisin (which is the PNG trade language) as we could.  We would often sit with the women as they made bilums (which are the all purpose bags that are made out of woven string and I even learned to make one myself).

The people in Papua New Guinea live off what they can hunt or gather from the land.  Some days we went to the gardens and helped gather fire wood or bring back yams or we hiked to the sago swamps and helped in the laborious process of harvesting the white paste from the middle of a certain kind of palm tree.  Sago is served in a number of different ways but is best fried with grub worms imbedded in it.  (Not really, but it was worth the experience. It is best, fried, sans grubs).

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Although most meals we ate in our own food in the house, the women were happy to teach us to cook over an open fire and to help make their meals.  Some of our other experiences include hiking to see a WWII plane that had crashed in the area, going fishing, visiting the school in the village, going to a neighboring village and meeting with the national translators, having a village wide meal, learning some of the native song and dance, and swimming in our fantastic river nearly every day.

My time in the village was wonderful and I would still rather be there.  I did a lot of really cool things, but more importantly I built wonderful relationships and was sad to leave the people who had become so dear to me after such a short time.  I am proud to say that my language learning went well and after only two weeks I can understand most of what I hear and carry on a decent conversation.

The time of meeting with the national translator was very helpful and encouraging.  Throughout this entire time, God has been confirming His call on my life.  I know that being a Bible translator and living so far away will not be easy but I am trusting that God will give me the strength to do what He has called me to.  I am excited to say that I have left a piece of my heart in PNG and have found another place to call home.

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As a “veteran” missionary and Bible translator, I am thrilled when I read letters, such as the one above.  At times, when I go back to PNG on another trip, I can sometimes forget to look around and enjoy the beautiful scenery around me since I have been over there so many times.  But most times I do get that sense again of being transported over into a true Paradise on earth.

More importantly, I am very encouraged when I read of the excitement that a new missionary has on their first-time experiences.  And to see one write of her desire to come back and work long-term as a Bible translator is definitely the best news of all.  I only had a brief chance to meet this young woman in Dallas as she was in my “Introduction to Linguistics” class before she flew to PNG.  But I look forward to the day that God will bring her back to PNG as a full-time missionary.

Remember: “the harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few”.
Praise God for this potential new Bible translator who wants to return to PNG to serve the Lord in Bible translation.

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* If this article has been helpful to you and a blessing, please invite your friends to come visit this devotional blog site.

Scripture Impact On National Translators

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Bible Translation Ministers to the Lives of Those Who Do The Translation

One of the things that I have noticed over the years as I have been involved in doing Bible translation, and now as I check the translations that others do, is that sometimes we get so focused in on the task of doing translation that we forget to watch for and expect the translation to have a real impact on the lives of those who are doing and checking the translation.

It is very easy as they say, “to lose sight of the forest for the trees”.  In other words, we can be so caught up in making sure each sentence of the translation clearly and accurately expresses the same meaning as the original Greek or Hebrew sentences of the Bible that we can fail to stop or even slow down to let that meaning speak to our hearts and deepen our relationship with God.

    

It’s like the Martha/Mary story we learn from Luke 10:38-42.  When Jesus came to the house of these two sisters, Martha was intently focused on getting all the preparations ready and just right to host Jesus at their supper table and actually got upset that Mary was quite content to sit at Jesus’ feet and listen to His teachings.  When Martha complained, Jesus said, “Martha, dear Martha, you’re fussing far too much and getting yourself worked up over nothing. One thing only is essential, and Mary has chosen it.”  (The Message)

I was reminded of the importance of keeping our spiritual eyes open to see what God is doing in us and in the lives of those with whom we work on these Bible translation projects when I read the excerpt below written by a good friend of ours who has been doing translation work for over 15 years in the Solomon Islands.  I pray you will also be encouraged and challenged by the powerful workings of God’s Word in the lives of people as you read his story.

                                

In our last letter, I mentioned some ‘bumps in the road’ that we were experiencing. It has been good to see how God has worked in these situations over the last few months.

I wrote that Jiro, the man doing the computer work for the translation, had recently lost his 19 year old son due to an illness. So when I arrived in the Solomon Islands in early March it was great to see that he was already there and he made it clear that he is still committed to working on the translation.

I was surprised to see how well he was doing and I found it quite humbling to hear him say how he accepted the loss of his son as something that God allowed to happen. I was also grateful that Jofi, who had injured his leg in the middle of last year, was well enough to come so that we had our full team as we worked together for two weeks reviewing the gospel of Mark.

    

We spent a good deal of our time discussing the meanings of different words. There are two main dialects in the language and it is important to choose words for the translation that will be understood by everyone. After listening to some sections being read out loud it was great to hear the men comment about how satisfying it was to hear the Scriptures in their own language.

They said it will make it easy for preachers because after people hear the Scriptures in their mother-tongue language they will understand and won’t need to have it all explained like they do when English versions are used in churches. When we finished reviewing Mark, we printed out fifty trial editions.

The men have taken those back to their communities and will read them to people and hopefully get feedback that we can use in further revisions. Jiro is currently working on Luke and Matthew and we hope to check these when I make my next trip in late August.

    

 Just before I was heading to bed one evening, I saw Somaka, a member of the translation team for the other language group which is closely related to the one we are working in, sitting at a table in the lounge area writing in a notebook. I remembered that I had a message I needed to give him so I went over to talk to him.

As I was leaving, he called me back and said, “I have been sitting here writing down all the things I’m thankful to God for. Can I tell you about them?” So I sat down and Somaka explained to me that in the few years that he has been involved in translation work, he has been learning what it really means to be a Christian.

    

He told me how he had come to realize that all people sin, but because of Jesus’ love for us, no sin was too bad for Him to forgive. He also explained that he had come to understand that he didn’t have to try and do things so that God would accept him. As he talked, it struck me that even though Somaka has attended church for most of his life, it is only now that he is interacting with God’s Word in his own language that he is understanding the basics of the Christian life.

I am always thankful for these reminders that God uses translations in people’s heart language to bring them closer to Him.

Bible Translation In The Digital Age

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Making Advances in Bible Translation Through Technology

Pioneer Bible Translators, with whom we work, just sent out their May “E-News”, an electronic newsletter to keep people updated on what PBT is doing around the world.  The first article, reprinted below, immediately grabbed my attention as I too have seen over the past two decades just how much our work is being affected positively by the electronic technological revolutions of our day.

Thankfully I was not doing Bible translation in the time period where the translators had to do everything by hand or slow and sloppy typewriter copies.  When our family went to the small village in Papua New Guinea in 1997, we brought along our massively heavy IBM desktop computer and full-size desktop monitor.  What a beast of a machine.  And if we didn’t have good solar power days, then we still had to rely on doing some work by hand.

As you read the opening paragraph, you will see it mention the use of a box filled with cards.  In the earliest days of Bible translation work, they literally used 3” x 5” recipe or blank cards, and would file them by categories and by alphabet in their shoeboxes.  When one of the breakthrough computer assisted translation tools was created, they decided to lovingly call the translation software, “Shoebox”.

                                

A small brown box sat on a shelf in our village home. Filled with note cards, that box represented years of study and work; it was a handwritten dictionary. It came to us from a missionary who had spent decades ministering in that area, learning the language by keeping a record of each word on a card. With pencils and manual typewriters, a missionary labored to bring the New Testament into a language for the first time. It was a daunting task, but that didn’t stop him.

In the past 30 years God has brought about a transformation greater than anyone could have imagined. Drawn by a vision to see God’s Word changing lives in every language, missionary teams from numerous Bible agencies have devoted their lives to translation all over the world. Of course, it wasn’t simply Westerners drawn into the task. As Christian communities around the globe grew, they themselves recognized the need for a Bible in a language they understood well.

    

While the numbers of translators and translation projects grew, their tools also expanded and became more and more powerful. Instead of relying solely on handwritten work, translators gained access to computers. Suddenly, drafting texts, making copies, checking spelling, and revising all became more doable tasks.

By 1996 the New Testament was available in the languages of 84 percent of the world’s population.[i] Now it is estimated that only 700-900 million people remain in the world without the whole New Testament in their language, of which 350 million have no Scripture at all.[ii] 

New technologies have not simply opened the door to faster progress in the translation task; they have also created new possibilities for communication. Today digital Scripture distribution is a reality. Downloadable over the Internet, print-on-demand, live streaming audio, and text via cell phones—these abilities will only grow in the coming decades, giving people unprecedented access to the Bible in whatever their situation.

Over the coming decades, if the people of God will mobilize more Bible translators, innovate ever greater technologies for the task, and give more resources toward Bible translation, we have the chance to make the greatest contribution toward obeying the great commission in history. Lately, missionary recruits have been flocking to Pioneer Bible Translators, and we are praying that God will continue to add to our team so that we can double our number of teammates again by 2018.

Our goal is to fill the gaps in the Bible translation movement so that we and our partners will see churches with Scripture transforming every language group by 2050. Your support of Pioneer Bible Translators moves us closer to this reality and we thank you!

                                

I too want to thank so many people and churches who have stood with me and my family over many years as we have worked hard to help get God’s Word into the hands of the people of Papua New Guinea.  We know that there are literally hundreds of people who pray for us and for our translation work on a regular basis.  We also know that we would not be able to do as well as we are doing in this ministry work without this prayer coverage.

I would also like to thank the many people who have helped us financially to do this work.  PBT is what is known as a “Faith” mission.  By that we mean that every missionary (including us) do not receive a guaranteed salary from our mission, but rather, we live by faith trusting that God will prompt churches and individuals to help support our work financially.  Presently, we are receiving only 75% of our projected budget, but we are still moving forward by faith that God will supply the need at the time we need it.

Perhaps God may be calling some of my “Listening Post” readers to join us as financial partners as well as supportive readers of this devotional blog.  If God has spoken to your heart about helping support our work as I have written so much about in these blog articles, please send me an email to norm.weatherhead@gmail.com  and I can let you know how you could become a partner with us in this important ministry.  May God bless you all as you read these words.

                                

[i]Wycliffe Bible Translators 1996. Bible Translation Needs Bulletin. Dallas, TX: Wycliffe Bible Translators.

[ii]Forum of Bible Agencies. Forum of Bible Agencies International, 2011. Available from http://www.forum-intl.net

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