Christian Perspective On Wealth

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The Plinky Question for this week is:  “What Does Wealth Mean to You?”

That’s an easy question, isn’t it?  I mean, isn’t the answer obvious? Wealth is money, jewelry, fancy cars, exotic holiday locations, power, lots of material objects, land & property, and on and on goes the list.  But if that is the answer, then only a very tiny fraction of people in the world would be considered “wealthy people”.

And yet, there is a stunning and sad fact of life that goes along with the thought just expressed above.  If you ask this question “What is wealth?” to the average person, you will find them stating what I just wrote above.  And then if you ask a related question, “Do you think wealthy people are generally happy?” most people would very quickly answer “No!  I doubt that.”  And why is that do you think?

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Here are a few thoughts:

  1. Rich people get bored.  How many days can you just sit on a beach and drink champagne?
  2. Rich people have to be suspicious of everyone.  Every hand that reaches out to shake their hand will often ask for some kind of hand out or suggest ways that they can help spend that money.
  3. Rich people live in fear.  They become targets for kidnappers and potential blackmail people.
  4. Rich people can buy but not hold friendships.  Once the money is gone, supposed friends seem to disappear.
  5. Rich people cannot escape the inevitable no matter how hard they try.  How many plastic surgeries will they endure to keep looking young, and their money does them no good when they die?

Now if even just half of what I suggest here is true, then there is certainly no way that I ever want to be a really wealthy man.  I mean really, if riches ultimately cannot provide a person with joy and true long-lasting friendships, then why pursue those riches.  (Ah ha, I’ve just revealed a part of what true wealth is: it is having true meaningful relationships with others, and possessing an inner spirit of joy.)

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Just recently, I worked through a Southeast Asia translation on the book of Matthew.  Consider from the English back translation how they translated the words in Mt. 6:19-21:

“Don’t gather treasure for yourself in this world, where termites and rust will destroy that treasure of yours, and a thief can break in and steal it.  Instead, gather your treasure in heaven, where termites and rust cannot destroy it, and a thief cannot break in and steal it.  For where your treasure is, that is where your heart is also.

Notice here the two dangers we face if we build up our “treasures” here on earth?  We face the possibility that either termites or rust will destroy whatever we own.  Now that probably sounds pretty odd to you, doesn’t it?  When was the last time that we had to fight off termites or deal with rust in our comfortable North American homes?

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Consider this from the perspective of someone who lives in a remote village in some developing country though.  And it is more than Southeast Asia that I am thinking of.  It is the Pacific Island countries, the tropical jungle areas of South America, the dusty sun-baked villages of Africa, and many more places in the world.  There is still a majority of the world living in poor to poverty-stricken areas.

For these kinds of people, their vast wealth in life can be listed on a short piece of paper: 2 sets of clothes (maybe), a wooden, mud or bamboo hut, a couple of old dented pots, a machete, and an ax if they are real fortunate, etc.  And so for them, the danger of termites eating through their walls and floors, and rust damaging their few tools and cooking items is certainly a real threat to their livelihood, and perhaps their very survival.

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But Jesus’ words are meant for even these poor people to hear.  We must not put our trust and our hopes in even these few meager items, for life is more than just surviving from day to day.  And life is most certainly more than all the trinkets, gadgets and possessions we have in the West.  No, real life begins and ends in our relationship with God.

You see, it is really all about perspective and values.  If we view life totally from a “Me” perspective, and if we place a high value on the things of this world, then everyone from the billionaire to the shanty town dweller will be yearning for more than what they presently have. So a very “wealthy” person or a destitute person have it all wrong when it comes to what is of true worth in this life.

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In Matthew 13, Jesus teaches many parables, and in verses 44 – 46, Jesus compares the Kingdom of Heaven to a great treasure found buried in a field and to  a fabulous costly pearl found at a market.  Jesus states in these parables that finding the joy or having God rule over one’s life (i.e. the meaning of “Kingdom of Heaven”) is worth so much that a person would be willing to sell all earthly possessions to be able to own that field, to buy that pearl, to become a citizen with God’s Kingdom.

So what is my perspective on wealth?  I know that I am a child of the King, and an heir to all the promises of God and all the blessings and riches of Heaven.  I have the love of God my Father, and the salvation bought for me by Jesus, and the joy and presence of the Holy Spirit, and the fellowship of other believers.  What more could I ever want.  Truly, I am a wealthy man.

God And Me Through The Years

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The Plinky Question for this week is:
“Write one thought or sentence that summarizes each year of your life.”

This idea for an aricle caught my attention. I am now 50 years old, which seems to me to be a good place at which I could look back and survey the years that I’ve lived. I think this could be quite interesting, so let’s have a go at this and see what we come up with. What I will try to do is summarize my life in five-year blocks. I hope you also find this interesting.

Infancy

  • 1960: “It’s a boy!”  (Norman Craig Weatherhead enters the world.)
  • 1961:  Not much to say. (But wait until I become a linguist.)
  • 1962: “Guess what Mom? I can sink.”  (The day a lifeguard rescued me.)
  • 1963:  Little boys and puppy dog tails.  (The question was, who was chasing whom?)
  • 1964:  Droopy drawers and hanging out doors.  (Ask my mom about that one.)
  • 1965:  An early perfectionist.  (20 minutes to cut out the picture in kindergarten.)

Childhood

  • 1966: “I love reading!”  (Me, my Mom, and the Principal. Read the story here.)
  • 1967:  Canada becomes independent. (I rolled my centennial penny all the way home.)
  • 1968:  Sent home with a note.  (“You can’t tackle girls outside school and kiss them?”)
  • 1969:  Standing in the corner.  (“You mean I can’t speak out in class when I want to?”)
  • 1970:  Chased by bullies.  (Aha, that’s why I became a long-distance runner.)

Early Teen Years

  • 1971:  Grade Sixers Rule!  (It’s nice to start the school year at the top of the school.)
  • 1972:  God becomes real. (Read here how God first touched my life.)
  • 1973:  Born-again.  (I commit my life to Christ and am baptized.)
  • 1974:  Special leaders.  (Thank God for Youth Group leaders who cared about me.)
  • 1975:  Love for math.  (Doing 10th grade algebra in my 9th grade math class.)

Later Teen Years

  • 1976:  Love for running.  (All the way to Calgary city finals in the 800 m race.)
  • 1977:  Jesus and me in the Navy. (Read about my faith under fire in this story.)
  • 1978:  A high school grad.  (With honors and scholarships to boot.)
  • 1979:  Up the Amazon.  (My first short term mission with Teen Missions Intl.)
  • 1980:  Full-time missionary.  (18 wonderful/challenging months with Teen Missions.)

Young Adult

  • 1981:  Bible college begins.  (Alberta Bible College – what a great school!)
  • 1982:  Learning pastoral ministry. (Youth group leader and church intern. Crazy!!)
  • 1983:  The famous “Sandwich”.  (How I started dating Jill.  I even made the bread.)
  • 1984:  I graduate, Grandma dies, Jill and I get married.  (What a week!)
  • 1985:  Seminary in subzero.  (Canadian Theological Seminary in Saskatchewan.)

Early Married Years

  • 1986:  Summer missions with Jill.  (Last year Dominican Republic, now Mexico.)
  • 1987:  Celebrate with Jill. (Jill gets her nursing diploma and sings on stage.)
  • 1988:  Church  planter?  (A valiant effort, but a “dry well” in Texas.)
  • 1989:  Our bundle of joy.  (Eric is born. Bring on those diapers!)
  • 1990:  Pain in the offering.  (Not wanted at a church.)

Finding Direction

  • 1991: “Is he the father?”  (Glen is born – 9 lbs. 14 oz. and 23 3/4 inches long.)
  • 1992:  Ministry in the Prairies. (God uses a city boy in a country church.)
  • 1993:  God humbles me.  (Read the full story here.)
  • 1994:  Love for biblical languages.  (Hooray for Lincoln Christian Seminary.)
  • 1995:  Training to be a Bible translator.  (Studying linguistics in Dallas.)

Translation Years

  • 1996:  Churches support our ministry.  (Getting ready and set to go to the field.)
  • 1997: “But it’s not the swamps!”  (We moved to a small village in PNG.)
  • 1998:  An official alphabet.  (The first thing published in the Nend language.)
  • 1999:  Death in the family.  (My father dies; we visit family and supporting churches.)
  • 2000: Hard at work.  (Translation on the Gospel of Mark goes forward.)

Difficult Years

  • 2001:  Bible school in the Bush.  (Teaching Genesis to Revelation in the village.)
  • 2002:  The Diagnosis. (Eric has leukemia and we return to Canada.)
  • 2003:  Chemotherapy and photo ops.  (Eric chosen as cancer’s Spokes Kid.)
  • 2004:  A good year.  (Teaching at Western Christian College.)
  • 2005:  Management training.  (Preparing to serve in East Africa.)

Transition Years

  • 2006:  Family choices.  (Eric returns to Canada for Gr. 12; three of us stay in Africa.)
  • 2007:  Back to Canada. (We help the boys with college and getting ready for life.)
  • 2008:  Another diagnosis!  (A muscle disease hits Norm and walking gets tough.)
  • 2009:  Slowly and carefully.  (Jill and I take one short mission trip to PNG.)
  • 2010:  Finding solutions.  (Wheelchairs, walkers, and recliners allow me to do work.)
  • 2011:  A step of faith.  (Norm lives in Dallas for 4 months doing translation work.)

And so there you have it folks, my entire life in one page. I found it quite interesting to think back over all the years and consider what the highlights were for each of those years. As you can see, God or ministry work (either in North America or in overseas countries) was a big part of many of these years. Of course there have been some discouraging times and difficult times. But for the most part, I can just about say that I found something positive in each and every year.

Well, I hope that you enjoyed this overview of my life. Perhaps you may find doing something like this, writing out the summary of your life year-by-year, may turn out to be just as interesting and valuable to you as it was to me doing my own life history. In some ways, I think it comes down to our basic outlook and attitude in life. For me, I try to live by these words: “Giving honor and glory to God in all that I do.”

Speaking Words Of Praise

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The Plinky Question for this week is:  “Remember that one time on the bus, when…”

Oh yes, I certainly do remember.  My mom and I were going somewhere in town, and seeing as we did not have a car, we naturally caught the local transit bus.  I was the youngest of the four children, so it was not unusual that I was taking the bus alone with mom as my siblings were either in school, or were old enough to be at home alone.  So taking a bus was a part of life, and meeting people on the bus was also a part of life.

Now when we would get on the bus, mom would pay for the ride and walk down the aisle to get us a seat which would leave me to take my time to slowly walk down the aisle and greet people as I went along.  You might think that I am, and was, an extrovert, always greeting people.  But actually, I am an introvert who is, and was, fascinated by people.  And so I would “socialize” while at the same time I would “analyze” all the people I met.

This would take me quite a few minutes.  And on this particular day, since the bus was mostly full in the front, my mom found a place for us on the bench at the back of the bus.  By the time I had finally got to the seat and was about to sit down, the driver had to slam on his brakes for some reason.  Meanwhile, I had pulled my head down a bit in order to sit down, and guess what happened.  The sudden deceleration caused me to fly forward, but since my head was down and I was a small boy, I literally rolled like a bowling ball all the way up the aisle and landed beside a very surprised bus driver.

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Before I continue with this story, I want to interject a thought which I just read from the site “Connection! Devotions for Every Day Life which I get every day:

Nurturing the Fruit of Praise

Posted: 29 Aug 2011 12:00 AM PDT

Oh the depth of the riches both of the wisdom and knowledge of God! How unsearchable are His judgments and unfathomable His ways! For who has known the mind of the Lord, or who became His counselor? Or who has first given to Him that it might be paid back to him again? For from Him and through Him and to Him are all things. To Him be the glory forever. Amen” (Romans 11:33-36, NASB).

Praise is reshaping our lips (and our living) around the glory of God. We use our words for everything else. We practice speaking for work, for school, for interacting socially. We must also practice (and that sacrificially) to honor God with our words. The text speaks of the “fruit of lips that confess his name.”

Fruit begins in a blossom; then it takes time to become full-grown and ready for harvest. Fruit doesn’t develop quickly, but over time, given the right conditions—the right soil, the right moisture, the right amount of sunshine, the right amount of care, pruning as needed, just enough fertilizer—all this and more. The fruit of praise must be nurtured and cultivated in the garden of obedience.

–Taken from Power Praying (Hearing Jesus’ Spirit by Praying Jesus’ Prayer) by David Chotka

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Now back to my bus story.  What happened to me certainly caught the attention of everyone on the bus.  After all, it’s not every day that you see a little boy roll down the aisle like a bowling ball.  Everyone was so concerned and worried for me.  But hey, I was just a little boy!  So I quickly bounded to my feet, dusted off my clothes, and went down the bus for the second time and greeted everyone and said hello.

I wish life could have always remained that simple.  And I wish I could have retained that personality of mine of being a “socialite introvert”.  But life suddenly became hard for me once I entered Elementary School, where being “nice” to everyone is not always appreciated.  In fact, for a number of reasons, I became the laughing-stock of the class and was regularly picked on by kids both in my grade and from some who were older than me.

The result of this was that I painfully learned the lesson in life, that it was better to be quiet and not say anything to anyone.  The budding skill I had on the bus to be kind to strangers and say something nice to others was squashed in public school.  By God’s grace though, He came and found me in Grade 7 and I was able to use words of praise and thanks once again as I began my journey with my best friend, Jesus.

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But with regards to people, it took me a lot longer to relearn the skill and the joy that I had begun as a child to reach out to other people and try to bring a smile to their faces.  In fact, even into my middle 30’s I was not as tuned into people as I ought to have been.  And my narrow world of self-centeredness hindered me from really seeing and appreciating people around me.

It wasn’t until we lived in the village in Papua New Guinea for five years that I really learned how to sit down with someone for hours and talk about basically nothing.  But just being willing to sit there and let people talk, I was finally once more maturing my blossom of being others-centered.  And now I find it easy once again to say hello to strangers, and to try to leave them with a smile on their face.  One thing has changed though.  I have no desire to do any encore of rolling down the aisle in front of others.  🙂

My Bucket List of Countries

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The Plinky Question for this week is:  “What 3 countries would you like to visit?”

In some ways, I feel like God built me to be an explorer.  As early as age 12, I was on the road with youth group trips at least a couple of times a year.  When I was 16, I was in the Canadian Navy and sailed all the way to Peru and back.  (That story will be published in the next Post.)  My first mission trip was to Brazil in 1979 with Teen Missions when I was only 18 years old.  And I have been traveling the world ever since.

So being a traveler, it’s quite natural to have a sort of “Bucket List” of countries I would want to see one day.  I suppose most of us have this kind of list, but many do not have the privilege and opportunity as I have had to see the world.  In fact, I have been very fortunate to have accomplished the following stats.  I have:
  • lived in 6 out of the 10 Canadian Provinces, and visited 3 of the remaining 4
  • lived in 3 States, and visited all 48 USA continental States
    • (Alaska & Hawaii here I come! : ) )
  • set foot on 6 out of the 7 world continents (not interested in Antarctica)
  • been in 26 countries of the world, 13 of which I have done ministry work for God

I certainly do not want anyone to think I am boasting about all my travels.  Heaven forbid!  No, I stand back in awe and amazement that God has chosen to use me, and it has been by His grace that I have been able to be His servant in some of the remotest places on earth.  And it amazes me even more that He can still use me and allow me to travel so much, in spite of my muscle disease.

And so, being the dreamer that I am, I do play around with my “Bucket List” of countries that I would still like to see.  I do recall that during my teenage years that one of my goals was to visit a tropical paradise island, say like Fiji, or Tahiti.  And while I was with Teen Missions, I had this strong pull to go to Vanuatu.  These kinds of countries bring up images of white sand, palm trees swaying, and aqua-marine blue waters.

Well I may not ever make it to Tahiti or Fiji, but God certainly allowed our family to experience some great moments in the beautiful and tropical island of New Guinea, specifically living on the eastern half of it in the country of Papua New Guinea.  For most of the time from 1997 to early 2002, we lived in a small village tucked deep into the lowland jungle, and then paid visits to the majestic highlands and to the idyllic coast lands of that country.  And in 2001, I spent a week in the fabulous country of Vanuatu to attend a nation-wide church centenary celebration.

So then my second choice I think of a country I would like to visit is Germany.  This country has such a fascinating history and has showcased both the very best and the very worst of humanity.  Some of the greatest minds, especially theologians, were from Germany.  And of course, one of the world’s worst tyrants ruled in Germany.

If I was able to actually visit Germany, the one thing above all else that I would want to see would be the remains of the Berlin Wall.  This wall, which separated East from West, Communism from Capitalism/Democracy, is symbolic to me of what lies within the hearts of all people.  Part of being human is the desire to conquer and control, but no matter how oppressive the regime can be, nothing can ever stamp out the desire of the human heart to be free.  And thanks be to God for tearing down this wall and bringing freedom (even with all its problems) to the people of Eastern Europe.

But if you were to ask me what is still probably my number one country that I would most like to see, it would have to be Israel.  Not only would I like to see Israel because I am a historian and a theologian, but simply because I am a Christian.  So many of the events recorded in the Bible took place in such a small geographical part of the world.

It would truly be amazing to me (if I could do it) to see places like Jericho, where God brought down the walls, or the wide lands where Abraham dwelt and David kept his sheep.  But most of all, to see Nazareth where Jesus grew up, to walk along the shore of the Sea of Galilee where Jesus taught, to see Jerusalem where men from David down to Jesus our Lord are hailed as kings.  And then to see the Garden where Jesus prayed, and the hill where He was crucified, and the tomb from which He arose victorious over death.  Oh yes, now that would be my heart’s desire, to see the Holy Land.

So these are the countries that I have thought about for many years.  Each one fascinating in their own way.  But one more country that I long to see, and one day I will, is Heaven itself.  To walk the streets of gold, to drink of the pure living water, to eat of the fruit from the Tree of Life, to walk side-by-side with my Lord Jesus and to see God face-to-face.  Now that is definitely something to look forward to.

My prayer for you, my dear Reader, is that you too have put your faith in the Lord Jesus, so that when He returns one day to gather His followers, I might see you in Heaven one day as well.

“Even so Lord Jesus, Come!”

Favorite Holiday Movie

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The Plinky Question for this week is:  “What is Your Favorite Holiday Movie?”

This question may look easy, but it’s not.  Where would a person start?  With the traditional classics?  Would I pick “It’s a Wonderful Life“, “White Christmas“,  or “Miracle on 34th Street“?  (Of course there would be a problem if I picked “Miracle on 34th Street” as I would then have to chose The Original, or The Remake.)

I’d really be in trouble if I said my favorite holiday movie is “A Christmas Carol“, as there have been four releases of this story, going back as far as 1938 for its first debut, and coming all the way up to as recent as 2009 starring Jim Carrey.  Oh, and of course I would have to include in this group the special Jim Henson version in 1992 “The Muppet Christmas Carol” starring Michael Caine as Mr. Scrooge, and Kermit the Frog who played the ever loyal assistant Bob Cratchit.

Perhaps I should stick to more family-centered movies, like “A Christmas Story“, or “Home Alone (#1 or #2?)” or perhaps a mighty belly laugher, gut-splitting anti-Christmas comedy movie like “Christmas With the Kranks“.  And speaking of Tim Allen, who plays Jolly ol’ Nick three times in the blockbusters “Santa Clause 1“, then “Santa Clause 2: the Mrs. Clause“, and finally “Santa Clause 3:  The Escape Clause.”   Aaaaaaahhhhhhh!!!!!  Too many choices.

And let’s not forget the animated movies that we all love, like “Mickey’s Christmas Carol“, “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Movie“, “Frosty the Snowman” and let us never forget”The Grinch Who Stole Christmas.”  All of these terrific movies cannot be simply brushed away if I were to pick one and only one and claim that this is my most favorite holiday movie.

So what is the answer?  Well, we decided there must be some happy middle ground, and this is what we finally came up with.  As much as possible over the years, we have saved up money and collected these various movies so that we have a whole section of one binder dedicated to “Christmas Movies”.  And each year, for the most part, we start watching the first movie about 2 weeks before Christmas, and each night from that point on, we will try to watch another Christmas movie.

And what is the final Christmas movie that we watch on the evening of the 24th, the night before Christmas?  Inevitably, it is “The Muppet Christmas Carol”  So now I guess you have caught me in my words.  If we had to choose one above all the others, this wold be the one.  We laugh, we cry, we sing along.  And in the end, we raise our voices and say along with Tiny Tim (who does not die), “God bless us, one and all.”

The End

Final P.S.:  So what is your favorite holiday movie, and why?  Come on, you can tell us.

My Hero….Captain Kirk

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The Plinky Question for this week is:   “Who is your hero and why?”

There could be lots of good answers to this question for me.  Like fiction characters such as Superman, Thor, or Jack Ryan of the Tom Clancy series.  There are some real missionary heroes that I look up to like Hudson Taylor, William Carey, or Mother Theresa.  And there have been some wonderful people who I have known and have influenced my life profoundly.  You can read about them in “God Spoke Through People.

But in keeping with the fun nature of Plinky.com, I thought I would tell you about one of my all-time favorite heroes, namely James T. Kirk, Captain of the legendary starship the Enterprise.  You might wonder if it is because he symbolizes all that I could wish to be.  He’s handsome, popular, sexy; he’s a ‘rough and tumble’ kind of guy (who always gets his shirt ripped to show off his bod to the ladies).

No, my ego is intact enough to not be threatened by such daunting physical qualities.  : )  Rather, it is his qualities of a great leader that make me want to walk in his shoes.  In every situation, no matter how bleak, he always had an answer, he always faced and conquered every challenge.  Just like his spoof counterpart, Tim Allen, who plays Commander Peter Quincy Taggart in the movie “Galaxy Quest“, the motto must go forth: “Never give up, never surrender.

This great phrase makes me think of Ephesians 6:10-18.  We are in the middle of a great spiritual battle for Planet Earth and all its people, whether we realize it or not.  I think one of the key verses in this passage is verse 13.  We are told who are enemies are, the spiritual forces of darkness at work here in the world and in the heavenly realms.  And after this verse we are told what our armament is for this cosmic battle.  But read what verse 13 says,

Therefore put on the full armor of God, so that when the day of evil comes, you may be able to stand your ground, and after you have done everything, to stand.

We are to dress (in spiritual terms) for battle, we are to face the battle, we are to engage in battle, and then having done all that, we are told to still keep standing.  We do find out in Ephesians 6 that our strength comes not from us, but from the Lord.  But we must have an attitude like Captain Kirk or Commander Taggart, “Never give up, never surrender.”

And I must say that with this kind of attitude, that Captain Kirk was the eternal optimist.  He always believed that he could do the impossible, and find a way out of any situation.  Like when he and his crew mates were stranded on the planet “Genesis” by the ruthless Khan.  (Star Trek 2: “The Wrath of Khan“…boy, what a movie.)  There was always a back up plan for Kirk.

How does this relate to us spiritually?  Have you or I ever felt like the situation was impossible, that there was no way to accomplish what needed to be done?  Sure.  But that is why we must treasure such a rich promise as Philippians 4:13,

I can do all things through Christ, because he gives me strength.

Or consider how difficult it is to face and conquer the temptations to do the things that are wrong that hit us from every side and bombard us day after day.  God knew this in advance and gave us the means to escape such powerful temptations that we face all the time in 1 Corinthians 10:13,

No temptation has seized you except what is common to man. And God is faithful; he will not let you be tempted beyond what you can bear. But when you are tempted, he will also provide a way out so that you can stand up under it.

So there you go.  Now you know who my favorite (non-fiction) hero is, and why.  If he were here right now, he would say to you and I, “Live long and prosper.”  But even better than this saying, is the fabulous promise of Jesus, our Lord and Savior,

I have come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly.

Chocolate or Vanilla?

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The answer is definitely CHOCOLATE. What’s funny is that it was many years after we were married before this fact became known to the family.

So here’s how it happened. After Jill came home from shopping and we were putting the frozen foods away, I decided to ask the question that had been on my mind for a while.

“Why do we always buy Neapolitan ice cream?” I said.

And Jill said, “Because it’s your favorite ice cream.”

Now i wondered how she could come to this conclusion. Hadn’t anyone ever noticed that when they had picked up the ice cream bucket that all the chocolate had been carefully carved out? So all that was left was a mixture of strawberry and vanilla ice cream with huge craters around them where I had dug to find the chocolate.

“So tell me how you came to this conclusion?” I asked.

“Well, whenever I visited you at your parent’s home before we got married, all I ever found in the freezer was Neapolitan ice cream. So I figured that was your favorite ice cream,” she replied.

So finally the whole story was out. It was because my father controlled the “sweets” department in our family that we always had Neapolitan ice cream in the freezer. And after being married for almost 10 years, I finally let my family know that I eat chocolate ice cream, and that is what Jill now buys for me.

Oh, and by the way, if you had checked the ice cream bucket at my house when I was young, you would have also seen huge craters carved out of it, and that the chocolate ice cream was always missing.

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