In this article, I want to share with you a story about a missionary who conducted a linguistic and anthropological survey through a region of South Asia where the “Bimble” people live.  Come along and experience what it is like to reach into new territory for God and learn, as this author said, “The whole trip was an experience in Almighty God’s ability to overcome all the problems that come our way. It started out as any trip to South Asia usually does, long hours in the air, stomach troubles, and the blazing heat. But then things got interesting with map, phone, and personnel issues.”

                                

“Maps of the area where the Bimble live are not exactly the best. In fact you can call them abysmal and not be wrong. Road and villages are not shown unless they happen to be right on or connected to the “national highway” (I use that term in the most liberal sense). So David had to figure out a way to create a map of his trip.

He found a great program that would work on a cell phone and created roads on Google maps, tracked the locations he visited, and roads he travelled. With this and the help of a local doctor friend, he was able to find villages where he could do his survey. Unfortunately, the phone David had would not work on his Mac so he had to travel several hours to get a phone that would work.

Once he had the phone, it did worked well and was even used in the survey to play some sound clips for the participants. We hope that we can use the map to help other workers in the area to find the villages that David visited. “

    

“Regrettably, David had some trouble finding surveyors to work with him. It should not have been a problem except that the people that were supposed to help him cancelled just before he arrived and he had to find new people (one just got married and the other was in charge of testing that week). The first replacement he found seemed perfect, until they had to suddenly leave to the capital.

With only days to go David now had no team and he needed to find four new people. The lady that was leaving to the capital found three replacements. Then our friend in the Jowai Jacen D’Cannith (a fellow linguist, whom we could not have done this survey without) found us one more local person and he was training her.

The wonderful thing was that in the end the four (later five) replacements were excellent choices since they even had family and friends among the Bimble that were able to help David in the survey. Just shows you that as always the Lord Almighty knew what He was doing.”

    

“While training the new team, David learned a bit about how things work in South Asia. For example, time works differently there. If you tell someone to come at 0900 sharp, you can expect them at anytime from 9ish to noon. And that South Asians learn a bit differently then people in the West. Not worse or better just different. Though frustrating, this allowed him to understand the people far better and prepared not only the surveyors but him as well for the next few weeks.

In Jowai, they started their work on a local festival day and were able to use this as a way to meet people and get some surveys done. The local surveyor’s family and friends were enough to get the rest. The festival was interesting; it was like a massive game of football (the kicking kind not the American throwing version) with a ton of people.

Two neighbourhoods’ teams competed and the stakes were high. According to local beliefs, the side that scored the most got the blessings of the gods for the year. It was quite a sight, people hanging off walls and roofs to watch the game below being played in the slick muddy street by barefoot people falling all over themselves. Great fun!”

    

“Other villages were just as interesting but in different ways. In one they were welcomed by the headman but told they only had an hour to do the interviews since school needed to start in the building they were using. After David explained they would not be able to do it that quickly because they needed to interview about 20 people, the headman helped them move over to the market place he was constructing.

He later helped them go to the other side of the village where they were all followers of the Lord Almighty. It seems that in his village the two groups are split and each has their own headman. But they seem to get along so it was not a problem (David learned that was far more common than we had known before).

Later that week one of best surveyors started loosing her voice so David trained the driver of the Jeep to do the survey. It was a good thing he did that since she totally lost her voice the next day and could not come with them. The driver did a great job. In the end, things went well and David got the data he needed.

However, the most striking thing about this survey trip for David and his team as they travelled through villages and met people was that the people there had never heard about God in their own language. They had always been told that to learn things you have to know Rustar not Bimble. The only book in Bimble is a treatise on the local animist religion and it is hugely popular. Think what an impact The Lord Almighty’s Words in Bimble could have in this area.”

Bible

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