Celebrating Christmas With Family

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Family Christmas 2012

It is quite natural for family members to get together and celebrate Christmas together.  And yet, we hear of so many families that are not able to do this either because of certain family dynamics, or simply because so many people are mobile and spread out to live in places that are far away from each other.

Less than two weeks ago, our family was spread out between Alberta, Ontario and Texas.  So I realize what a blessing it has been for all of us to be able to come together here in Calgary to be with each other.  It was so wonderful to come home on the 18th and be with my family after being away for two months.  And seeing the decorated tree encouraged my heart to know we had entered into the Christmas season.

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This particular Christmas tree has special meaning for us. When we were in Papua New Guinea years ago, a church in America sent this artificial tree to us so that we could have a Christmas tree in the village way out in the jungles of PNG.  We decorated up the tree in the front lobby area of our house so children in the village could see it, and it became quite the center piece for many discussions with the people and the children.

We had kept many of our special ornaments with us that reminded us of previous Christmas times together.  What a treat though, for us to have a tree from back home to be able to hang all our special decorations.  And of course, as many parents do, we stayed up late on Christmas Eve to wrap up presents to surprise our boys the next morning.

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Even with all the gifts that seemed to multiply around the tree each year, we still made sure we had taught our boys the true message of Christmas, of Jesus who was born as a baby, but who would one day die for us and be raised as our Lord and Savior.  We always tried to have special gifts for each other which we names as our “gold, frankincense and myrrh” gifts.

Now that our boys are young men (one is married and one is in the Canadian Army), we tend to buy less and less gifts and put the emphasis more on the message of Christmas and just being together.  It was still nice to give gifts to each other, (for the very spirit of Christmas is that of giving), and it’s amazing to see how creative we can all be after we said, “Let’s not spend much on gifts this year.”

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One thing we got this year to add to our Christmas tree was a special ornament.  We had found this beautiful ornament of the nativity scene, placed within a small hand-crafted gourd.  It has the family scene of Joseph, Mary and Baby Jesus, who are surrounded by the shepherds and the stable animals.

Just about any nativity scene touches my heart.  But when we saw this scene carved and placed within the little painted gourd, it reminded us of the fact that Jesus came to earth for men and women of every culture.  And gourds are something that we would associate with tropical countries, like that of Papua New Guinea, where this Christmas story needs to be shared with all the people who live on that tropical jungle island.

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And that brings me back to my first thought, of how special it is to celebrate Christmas with one’s family.  I am so thankful that I was able to return from my time down in Texas, and that our son in the military was able to get three weeks off for the Christmas break to come home to be with us.

We never know in this life when we will all be able to be together like this, now that we are all adults and leading very diverse lives.  We have a very short time together, but we are trying to make the very most of these few weeks.  It is my prayer that you too have been able to be reunited with family members this Christmas.  And I pray that Jesus is the center of your family, just as He is the center of ours.

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MERRY CHRISTMAS, AND MAY YOU HAVE A BLESSED AND HAPPY NEW YEAR!

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The Christmas Story Is Needed In Africa

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Light of the World

Do you ever imagine what it would have been like to be there when Jesus was born? What would it have been like to hear Gabriel explain to Mary what was going to happen to her; to hear Joseph explain what the angel told him in his dreams; to be with the shepherds in the field? What would it have been like to know that the Messiah was coming, but not know how or when? It’s hard for us to imagine since most of us were born into a world where Jesus came a long time ago.

It is not nearly as hard to imagine if you live where we live in Africa. The “world” our neighbors live in is essentially a pre-Jesus world. One could say the Light of the World has not been seen here yet. The evidence is everywhere…

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I just talked to a neighbor on my porch. He came with his toddler son. I could see amulets on the child, to protect him from the spirits or jinn. All the children here wear them. A “powerful” one can cost as much as enough rice to feed a family for a month. But because they are afraid, they find the money somehow. I wonder what they think when they see our children not wearing them.

I have another friend who lives in a village nearby. One day he told me the story of how his village was founded by his great-grandfather, a man said to have the ability to see and talk to jinn. When he first came to the area and recognized its agricultural potential, he could also see the many spirits all around.

They did not want to leave, but he was able to negotiate a deal with them specific to his family and not others – a covenant sealed with the sacrifice of nine rams. As he told me the stories, I couldn’t help compare his covenant, made by his grandfather and sealed with ram’s blood, with our covenant, made by Jesus and sealed with His own blood.

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And then there is Mariama. Her father brought her to us several months ago. She was suffering from all sorts of physical ailments and couldn’t sleep due to scary voices she attributed to jinn. We prayed for her and gave her a copy of Matthew in her language. We heard no more until her father sought me out again.

He doesn’t know what to think about us Jesus-followers, but he does know the spirits don’t bother us. He had taken her to various healers, but nothing helped. She looked much worse than when we’d last seen her, utterly dominated by unclean and evil forces quite beyond her ability to resist. Her face was the picture of absolute hopelessness. I’ll never forget it.

I wonder how many like Mariama lived in Palestine before Jesus came. The Scriptures say that people were astonished to see evil spirits obey Jesus and His disciples. In their “pre-Jesus” world, did they have any idea that someday they would be delivered from darkness through the blood of the Lamb of God?

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As you celebrate Jesus coming to Bethlehem this Christmas, remember those whose eyes are not yet opened to the Light of the World and pray they come to know Him! On behalf of Pioneer Bible Translators, we thank you for your prayers and financial support.

Come quickly, Lord.

Used by permission from Pioneer Bible Translator’s monthly eNewsletter.  If you would like to receive this monthly newsletter, click on this link “PBT eNewsletter” and subscribe to it.

Please Tell Us, Is Jesus The Messiah?

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John 10:22 – 30

22 It was now winter, and Jesus was in Jerusalem at the time of Hanukkah, the Festival of Dedication. 23 He was in the Temple, walking through the section known as Solomon’s Colonnade. 24 The people surrounded him and asked, “How long are you going to keep us in suspense? If you are the Messiah, tell us plainly.”

25 Jesus replied, “I have already told you, and you don’t believe me. The proof is the work I do in my Father’s name. 26 But you don’t believe me because you are not my sheep. 27 My sheep listen to my voice; I know them, and they follow me. 28 I give them eternal life, and they will never perish. No one can snatch them away from me, 29 for my Father has given them to me, and he is more powerful than anyone else. No one can snatch them from the Father’s hand. 30 The Father and I are one.”

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There are twenty one chapters in the Gospel of John.  Our study today is in the middle of chapter ten.  By the law of averages, you might think that we are about half way done telling the story of the life and ministry of Jesus.  But that is not true.  Jesus was about 30 years old when he began his public ministry.  It lasted about 3 1/2  years long.  This festival that Jesus attended would have been about four months before he died.

We will see when we get to the start of chapter 12, that the majority of the second half of this book deals with the final week of Jesus’ life.  Those last ten chapters cover the triumphal entry of Jesus into Jerusalem, the Last Supper, his arrest, trial and crucifixion, his burial and resurrection and his final appearances to the disciples.  Suddenly, a lot happened in a very short time.

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But notice what the people are saying to Jesus in verse 24 of our passage above.  For three years Jesus had gained quite a reputation with all of the miracles he had performed and the incredible teaching and preaching tours he had gone on throughout the provinces of Galilee, Samaria and Judea, and on the far side of the Jordan River.

You would wonder how the people could have asked this question, “If you are the Messiah, then tell us plainly.”  It is kind of like many people today I think that ask the question, “Is there really a God?”  One of my answers is, “Open your eyes and take a look all around you.  The vast beauty of the created Universe, the odds of life happening at all here on earth, and the intricate design of the human body calls out to me that there must be a Grand Designer behind it all.

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Listen then to how Jesus replied to their question: “I have already told you, and you don’t believe me. The proof is the work I do in my Father’s name.”  Now you may be thinking similarly to these Jewish people long ago, “What is this proof you are talking about?”  I believe that if we have been listening well to all that has happened and all that Jesus taught in the first ten chapters of John, we would know the answer.

In one of my commentary helps on John, called “The Translators Handbook,” it has this excellent summary that I would like to quote.  It says:

The Festival of Dedication is the last in the series of four important Jewish holy days mentioned in John’s Gospel, beginning in Chapter 5 (the Sabbath, Passover, Shelters, and Dedication). By healing the lame man on the Sabbath day, Jesus indicated his superiority over the Sabbath; by the teaching given in connection with the healing (5.17), he identified himself and his activity with God and with God’s work.

During the Passover Festival Jesus fed the multitude and so revealed that he was the life-giving bread that God had sent down from heaven. And at the Festival of Shelters, Jesus revealed himself as the life-giving water and the light for the world, thus fulfilling the meaning of the water and light ceremonies connected with that festival.

Now, at the Festival of Dedication, Jesus affirms that he is the one whom God has dedicated and sent into the world.

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To those who are really paying attention and are spiritually searching for the Truth, they will find it.  And they will recognize Jesus for who He really is.  And He in turn will recognize them as His people.  This leads us to one very ticklish doctrine that can trip up many people.  In verses 28–29, Jesus states that these people who do believe in Him cannot be snatched out of His hands, nor out of the Father’s hands.

This has led to a doctrinal idea of “eternal salvation”, the idea of “once saved, always saved”.  I really do not want to discuss this doctrinal idea as it has caused more arguments among Christians than it ever ought to have.  I do have one comment that may be helpful, which is based on the text as we have it.

We cannot comment on the will and action of the person who has put his life into the hands of Jesus and the Father, such as, will he/she remain faithful to God or not.  What this passage does say, is that there is no power greater than God Himself which can pull a devoted follower away from God.  My prayer is that all people might come to realize that Jesus is in fact the promised Messiah, and remain in that state of belief.  The promise is that no external force or person can steal that relationship with God away from the believer.  Praise God for that.

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More About Cool Computer Programs & Bible Translation

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Technology & Bible Translation – Pt. 2

Last week I gave you some of the interesting background of how the advance of technology and the computer age we live in has helped the cause of Bible translation work.  Isn’t it incredible to think that only a few decades ago, translators had to write all of their language data on 3″ x 5″ recipe cards and file them in their appropriate shoebox.  Read about that here.

Now it is impossible to think that we can do language learning and translation work without the use of a computer.  Even by 1997, when I started learning the village language in that remote location in Papua New Guinea, we had brought along with us solar panels and deep cell batteries to run my computer in the village.  Thank goodness for the advance technology of laptops though, because that first IBM desktop was a real bear to get to and set up in our village.

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Back to the present now, I had started to tell you in the last article about a very cool program called “Paratext”.  Remember all those windows that were open in the one program?  I had Greek or Hebrew in two windows, English Bibles and commentary helps in a few more.  I would look at the Tok Pisin (PNG trade language) in another, and then a few more held the vernacular village language of the text I was going to do the consultant check on.  I’ll show you again what it looks like:

Paratext Windows (800x450)

So at any given time, I usually have about four languages going on inside all these windows.  It would take a lot of time (or sentences) to explain everything that I can do with this program.  But let me give you a peek into one corner, and show you what I do.  I will open up the Hebrew language corner where I am working on the Psalms.

The first thing I want to show you, even though you probably don’t know Hebrew, is what amazing things you can learn when you can read the Bible in the original language that it was written in.  (The Old Testament was written in Hebrew, and the New Testament was written in Greek.)  I will paste the blown up picture of the Hebrew-English Interlinear text.  It looks like this:

Psalm 121 in Paratext Hebrew (800x427)

Underneath the Hebrew text you get a grammatical breakdown of the words in green, and then an English word gloss for the Hebrew word in the light purple.  I highlighted one word in yellow.  One of the interesting things about Hebrew is that most of its vocabulary is based on a three consonantal root form.  This particular root (שׁמר) has the basic meaning of “to guard, to watch over, to protect” .

This passage is from Psalm 121 which starts with a statement and then a question in verse one, “I lift up my eyes to the mountains.  Where does my help come from?”  That was a good question back in the time of the Israelite kings, because there was a great deal of worshipping of idols and false gods going on back then.  And many of them had shrines up on top of the mountains.

Do you see the answer in the next line, which is the first purple line above?  (Remember to read Hebrew from right to left.)  The psalmist was very confident that his help would come from the LORD, the One who made the heavens and the earth.  He goes on to write further about his God, and he used this Hebrew root of (שׁמר) three times in verses 3, 4, and 5.  (Can you see them?)

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This verbal form is called a “participle”, which is often used to help describe someone or something.  The literal translation for this Hebrew root in the participle form would be “the One who protects”.  The psalmist was confident that YHWH was the One true God, above all other gods, who could protect him.  This is good, but it gets better.

It is one thing to believe that God is capable of protecting those who trust in Him.  It is another thing to state emphatically that He will indeed protect you in times of trouble.  And this is what the psalmist does in verses 7 and 8.  He again used the same Hebrew verbal root, but in these verses (and three times) he put it in a future tense, what is called the “Imperfect” form.

You can see this twice in the picture above in verse 7.  It looks like this:  יִשְׁמָר.  There is an extra consonant on front, and it can be translated as “He will protect/watch over”.  No longer is the LORD simply described as the One who is able to protect, but now with bold confidence, the psalmist tells his readers, Yes, in fact He WILL protect those who trust in Him.

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Isn’t that so cool what you can learn about God when you are able to read the Scriptures in its original language?  I’m glad that I do know a lot about basic biblical Hebrew.  But imagine if I didn’t know that much about it, but still had a program like Paratext that is able to analyze a lot of the language for me.  A whole world of meaning is opened up when we have great computer programs like these to help us to read and understand the Bible.

I wish that I could let all of you who read this to be able to have this program I use.  But a program like Paratext is given out primarily to those involved in active Bible translation projects.  If you are really interested in this though, you can do an internet search for Greek-English Interlinear or Hebrew-English Interlinear Bibles online and find lots of helps.

One good site is http://interlinearbible.org/ which will allow you to choose either the Hebrew Old Testament, or the Greek New Testament.  We are so very fortunate to have so much available to us electronically.  I will have more to say in the future.

Jesus Cares & Sacrificed His Life For All People

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John 10:11 – 21

11 “I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd sacrifices his life for the sheep. 12 A hired hand will run when he sees a wolf coming. He will abandon the sheep because they don’t belong to him and he isn’t their shepherd. And so the wolf attacks them and scatters the flock. 13 The hired hand runs away because he’s working only for the money and doesn’t really care about the sheep.

14 “I am the good shepherd; I know my own sheep, and they know me,15 just as my Father knows me and I know the Father. So I sacrifice my life for the sheep. 16 I have other sheep, too, that are not in this sheepfold. I must bring them also. They will listen to my voice, and there will be one flock with one shepherd.

17 “The Father loves me because I sacrifice my life so I may take it back again. 18 No one can take my life from me. I sacrifice it voluntarily. For I have the authority to lay it down when I want to and also to take it up again. For this is what my Father has commanded.”

19 When he said these things, the people were again divided in their opinions about him. 20 Some said, “He’s demon possessed and out of his mind. Why listen to a man like that?” 21 Others said, “This doesn’t sound like a man possessed by a demon! Can a demon open the eyes of the blind?”

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In our last study, we saw the interesting paradoxes that Jesus was both the Shepherd for the sheep, as well as the Gate for the sheep through which they must pass in order to be safe.  We touched on another Biblical paradox in our last article as we suggested that Jesus was both the Savior and Mediator as well as the Sacrifice of this covenant of love and forgiveness from which we benefit eternally.

In verse 6 of this chapter, his listeners had asked Jesus what all his figurative language meant.  But we see in this next passage of the story here that Jesus continued using metaphorical language as he went on to talk more about sheep and shepherds, and the sacrifices that shepherds would make on behalf of their sheep.  So it may look like Jesus still had not answered their questions.  Or perhaps he did.

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Actually, I believe that Jesus’ opening words in verse 11 would have spoken quite loudly to his audience that day.  In the Old Testament, the people of Israel were often portrayed in poetic and prophetic material as being sheep.  And the leaders of the Jewish people were portrayed as shepherds who were to watch over and care for the flock, God’s people.

But as is so true in any human organization or institution, it does not take very long before those who are supposed to act as humble servants of God, caring for His people, start to become dominating overlords who look out for their own interests first.  So when Jesus said, “I am the good shepherd,” He was contrasting himself against the religious leaders of His day, the Pharisees and Sadducees.

These leaders were very self-righteous and exercised great influence over the people of Israel.  But they did not really care about the people, other than that they would obey all the rules and rituals that they had created and imposed upon the people.  When Jesus came on to the scene and started to preach and teach and even heal people, rather than rejoice at the power of God being displayed among them, they became very jealous and threatened by Him.  That is the primary reason why Jesus was accused, convicted and then killed on a cross.

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Jesus clearly marked out the difference between them and himself.  He said he was the “good” shepherd, who was so devoted to his sheep (the people) that he was willing to sacrifice his life in order to save them.  The religious leaders though were afraid of the Roman government which had control over Palestine back then.

If there was even the hint of a rebellion or a disturbance of the peace, there was the threat of the Romans coming back in and not only squelching the uprising, but also of destroying and dispersing the entire Jewish nation.  That is why Caiaphus, the high priest back then said in John 11:49-50, “it is better for you that one man die for the people than that the whole nation perish.

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Jesus was not caught up in all this political religious intrigue by accident though.  He knew that He would die, but even here in chapter 10, He says that he would sacrifice himself “voluntarily”.  And not only for the lost sheep (people) of Israel, Jesus said He would do this for those who were “outside the sheepfold”.  Jesus considered people who were not Jewish to also be part of His flock, and He would die to save them spiritually too.

And thank goodness for that!  Because you and I (who are not Jewish by birth) are able to be included within the family of God.  We are the “other sheep” whom Jesus wanted to bring inside of His sheepfold.  You see, God’s love is so big that it could never be contained within one cultural group.

And that is why I and my wife and many others are working diligently at translating the Bible into these remote minority languages around the world.  Because Jesus loves them too, and gave His life for them as well.  Our work is to bring this message to them in a language that they can truly understand, so that all who accept Him, will become part of His great flock.  Praise God!

enw_gospelofjohn_black2* If this article has been helpful to you and a blessing, please share it and invite your friends to come visit this devotional blog site.

Cool Computer Programs for Bible Translation

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Technology & Bible Translation

The first really cool peek for me into the emerging technology for Bible translators happened in 1994.  I had seen a little bit of the old program called “Shoebox” where linguists and translators would store their language data and enter their vernacular text which could then be interlinearized to have English gloss words under the vernacular text once you had a good amount of words entered into their dictionary file.

Let me pause here before going on and tell you why this linguistic computer program was called “Shoebox”.  Think back to the time before computers.  (If you can do that easily, you are my age or older, but if this is hard for you, then you are definitely part of the younger generation.)  😛  Now imagine that you have been doing language learning for a few years in a remote part of the world.

What would you do to help you keep your data all organized?  Even to divide words into basic verbs, nouns, adjectives and adverbs.  Well, the pioneers of Bible translation actually did use the old file card system and would put one word, and its description/definition, on to one card, and then “file” it in long shoeboxes to be retrieved later when needed.  (Some translators would have piles of shoeboxes in their houses full of words and linguistic notes in the early days.)

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Thank goodness for the advent of the computer.  Now we no longer need to put all of our research into old musty shoeboxes.  And we no longer need to fear that our work will all go up in smoke if the house burned down or would get all chewed up, by all the cockroaches in our village houses.  Though we do need to worry about hard drives crashing, and wondering where we put that information in the thousands of files on our hard drive.

But back to where I started.  “Shoebox” was very handy for us to organize our linguistic data and do basic translation work.  In 1994, when I was at a training week of orientation for Pioneer Bible Translators, I was introduced to the neatest, most cool and intuitive linguistic program at that time which was called “Lingua-links”.  It could add words, analyze words, interlinearize words, and so much more with just a click of a button.

When I was able to tell Jill later about this, I summed it up by saying, “That was SO AWESOME!”  Very professional, wouldn’t you say?  I think that is when I knew for sure that I wanted to be a Bible translator, because I would be allowed to buy the best model of computer out there, and make it perform some awesome linguistic feats, and be able to call it “work”.  I was in love!!  😀

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In the past decade, there continues to be great advances made in the area of marrying linguistics together with computer technology.  There were a number of versions of Lingua-links over the years, each being able to do more than the last version.  But the basic ideas remained the same.  And then came along a program called “Paratext”.

When I first heard about Paratext, I thought that it was just another program that was doing pretty much the same things I was already doing.  I was wrong.  It did still have much (and even more) of the computing power of the old programs.  One common feature with modern linguistic programs is the ability to open a large number of windows within the main window.  Here, let me show you what I mean:

Paratext Windows (800x450)

 Going from top left down and then middle top to bottom and right side top to bottom, I have these windows to work with just in this one program:
  1. My Hebrew text in which I can add notes.
  2. The Hebrew/English interlinear text.  I can add rows within this to give me the lemmas, the transliteration, and the parsing of the Hebrew words.  All of these are hyperlinked to one or more Hebrew Lexicon and Dictionary.
  3. A text comparison of a variety of English versions.
  4. A Key Term rendering window which will grab specialized biblical terms and show you the equivalent vernacular term which will add up over time to become your “Key Term List”
  5. A rendering tool based off of algorithms of the Greek and English text and looking into the vernacular text to produce a computer generated guessing and interlinearization of the vernacular to English.
  6. The “Back Translation” of the vernacular text.  We want a reverse translation from the translated local language back into a fairly literal English version of their text.  I use this the most to judge if something is missing, added or wrong in their translation.
  7. Peeking out at the top right is the Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew Lexicon.
  8. The NIV larger window box.
  9. Finally, the actual vernacular translation that I am checking.

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What was really exciting though about Paratext was that you did not just work on this project by yourself in your local village any more.  Of course you want to save to your local hard drive as you go along.  But Paratext is part of the global work of United Bible Societies and many other linguistic organizations who share their project information and their translations with others around the world.

So when you do an “Internet Server” back up of your work, it sends the data to the Paratext server on the other side of the world, and can be made accessible to anyone else who has been approved to work on the translation.  So we have literally gone from doing local translation projects to doing global translation projects.

There is so much more I’d like to tell you about this, but that will have to wait until the next article.  I hope that some of you who have read this have found this very interesting.  And who knows, maybe you’ll fall in love with what I am showing you, just like I did so many years ago with the joining of technology and linguistics.

Psalm 151 – Written By My Son

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Did the title of this article catch your eye?  As you may already know, there are only 150 Psalms in the Bible.  But when my son wrote and sent this poem to me (copied out below), I felt like it should belong in the Bible as an additional Psalm.  🙂  I hope you will enjoy reading it and find it encouraging to your faith.

As I read it, I was so impressed by his poetic style and his command of good imagery.  But I also saw that it showed throughout his positive faith in God and his Christian character.  Which is amazing for two reasons: 1) In previous years, Glen wrote many other poems.  He has exercise books full of them.  But so many of them were dark as he went through some difficult months of feeling lost.

And 2) Glen is currently training with the Canadian military, which is not a godly environment.  As you read the poem, you can see the “potential enemies” around him, and yet his faith is carrying him through as he works within a very strong non-faith environment.  I am very proud of him, as well as being proud of my other son, Eric, and his wife of 3 1/2 years, as they all remain true and fast to their faith in Christ and their devotion to God the Father.

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Psalm of Glen

Am I your child God?
Do I have your favor?
Do not abandon me in your anger.
Do not throw me away in your wrath.

How high do the wicked climb,
Trampling the honest and holy ones?

Who is left that Believes?

Father you are gracious.
Your love endures forever.
I, a lowly creature, am not worthy.
 

You have bestowed me gifts and abilities,
That which you have given to me
You have blessed my life and wrapped me
In your love and safety.

In times of trouble, to you I turn.
When I am blessed, to you I give thanks.

Oh Lord, Creator of all things,
You bent low and decided to create me.
I am your humble servant.

Teach me, oh Lord, that I may be,
Holy and righteous in your eyes.
Lead me in the steps of everlasting life.

Thank you Father, for this life.
You have given me much.
Much do I choose to owe,
Yet you hold no debt over me.

I am free, by your blood.
So let me be free in your power.

Rise up, Oh Lord and come to my aid
I am surrounded on all sides.
My enemies bare their teeth,
They wish to devour my flesh.

Oh Lord, My Rock, defend me, your humble servant
I will perish under the weight of their foot
On the rocks I shall be dashed to pieces
Rescue me from my imminent Death, Oh Lord.
Be Merciful to me.

For you are the everlasting God
There is none before, there is no end.
You took me into your arms
Called me like I am your child.

Father, my God, how majestic is your Name.
The mountains tremble at your voice
The trees shake their branches
Even the rocks cry out to you

Forgive us Lord, For our blindness.
We are a Deaf, Blind, Dying race.

You are God Alone.

Oh Lord, My God, Have mercy on me.
Turn to me with Favor,
For all I have done for your children.
Do not leave me to be eaten by the dogs
Raise me up on wings of eagles,
To soar above my enemies.

I will have victory, over my foe.
For the Lord is with me.
Strength and power are his.
The world bends to his call.

“You are my child, whom I love”
Says the Lord
” Do not have fear as you walk among the wolves,
Had the Lord not created the wolves as well?
Is there any power greater than I?”
Says the Almighty.

“I will rescue you from your pain,
I will bring aid for your wounds.
Trust in me,” says the Lord,
“And I will guide your path.”

Let my life be an offering to you.
Let my sacrifice and burnt offering be a pleasing aroma to you.
May I serve you with integrity and excellence.
And may your Word ever be on my lips.

Till the last breath, I serve you.

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦          ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦          ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Allow me one more time to commend what is written above.  I am currently preparing to do the consultant check on 1/3 of the book of Psalms for a language group over in Papua New Guinea.  As I have been studying all I can about psalms, I learned that there are seven key elements found within what is called a “Petition Psalm” also known as a “Lament Psalm”.

These elements, which can be found in this or a rearranged order, are as follows:

  • Appeal: the Psalmist calls to God to listen and pleads for help in a time of trouble.
  • Problem: greater detail is given regarding the problem that he is facing.
  • Request: what the Psalmist wants God to do in order to help deal with the problem.
  • Confession: his claim of innocence and/or a confession of sin before a holy God.
  • Profession of Faith: a strong statement of belief in God, who He is and what He can do.
  • Promise: a vow to praise God, serve Him, and/or a promise to bring God an offering.
  • Praise: a final word of praise or trust in God.

So now that you know this, what do you think about Psalm 151 (Glen’s Psalm).  Can you see all these elements within his poem?  Pretty darn cool, don’t you think?  [“Way to go son!”]

Glen 2010

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