[Editor’s Note: It is always exciting to go to another country and experience the richness of a new culture and a new language spoken around you.  Below is a portion of a newsletter that was written by some friends of mine with Pioneer Bible Translators back in August of 2010.  Try to picture yourself being with them as they discover new things, strange things, and maybe a few things to be worried about.]

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6 Months…

Wow! We have already been here six months . As we reflect on our time here we can definitely say that we are truly blessed. God has provided for all of our needs and even some of our wants. Sometimes as we live day to day, it is easy to overlook just how far God has brought us since arriving in February.

We have settled into our home here and into somewhat of a routine. We are now more than 2/3 through our formal language study and are gaining more confidence with each passing week. God has blessed us with new friends both expats and nationals and we have been able to strengthen some of the friendships which began while we were in Texas.

None of what has happened in our lives during the past 6 months would be possible without an awesome and faithful God and wonderful and faithful supporters like all of you. Praise be to God and many thanks to you for your prayers for us and our ministry.

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A Volcano

About 30 kilometers north of the city that we live in is an active volcano. The last time it erupted was about 27 years ago. Now it is a popular place for tourists to visit. You can hike or ride up to the top of the mountain and view the crater.

This month we had the opportunity to visit and experience some pretty amazing sights. The thought that kept running through my mind was, ’God is so cool!’ I am sharing a few pictures but they really do not compare with the beauty of God’s creation. Oh, and the (not so pleasant) sulfur smell could be very strong at times as well.

We spent the day with some friends sightseeing and hiking around the mountain. The weather was cool at the top of the crater and the hiking was extremely pleasant. Although somewhat scared, I even enjoyed looking over edges where there was either no railing or a railing made of bamboo or walking across a bridge constructed out of bamboo and rope that looked like thick yarn (not bad for an acrophobic!).

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Independence Day

Independence Day was celebrated this month but we were told that this year was not typical. Usually there are neighborhood parties, games, food and lots of excitement. This year we were told it was much quieter than normal because of fasting month. People of the majority religion (about 85% of the population) do not eat or drink from sunrise to sunset. So this puts a damper on celebrations because people have much less energy.

Last weekend however our church held a small gathering in honor of Independence Day. After worship service we listened to the children sing songs, joined in playing some traditional games and had a lot of fun.

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Cultural Corner

There are many things to get used to in a new culture. We will share some of the things we are learning about the culture here.

In the area where we live it is not polite to point to things or to point at people with your finger. There are several ways to indicate what you are referring to without pointing your finger. You can move or nod your head in that direction, use your elbow or simply use your thumb (which is our favorite). This does take some getting used to.

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Neighborhood Noises . .

In the neighborhoods here you can buy many things right in front of your house if you want. There are vendors that walk, ride bikes, motorcycles or trucks, push carts, or carry large items who roam the streets daily selling their goods. Each will have a certain sound that after a few months becomes very familiar. Some will play or sing a jingle, others will bang on hollow bamboo with a stick or tap on a plate or bowl with a spoon and some will repeat a phrase over and over again.

At first the sounds in the neighborhood were a little hard to get used to. Five times a day we hear loudspeakers that call the people to pray and several times a week speaking is also broadcasted. During the night there are security guards in the area that will bang on the metal street lamp poles as they make there rounds. This usually begins around 10:30 pm. Now all these sounds are becoming normal and at times even welcome (like when we need bread).

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[Editor’s Note: Cultural anthropologists and psychologists will say that the first few weeks to about the six month mark for a person in a new cross-cultural experience will be exciting and even euphoric.  This is called the “Honeymoon Stage”.  But at some point the newness wears off and it becomes difficult to work in the foreign environment.  During this time, a person can get depressed or even hostile.

If the person stays long enough, they may go through a period of resignation, where they function in the culture, but they lack joy.  Hopefully, the person will stay long enough to be able to adapt and integrate joyfully into the local culture and world around them.  This couple who wrote this newsletter has reached the last stage of cultural adaptation.  But please pray for any missionary you might know who may be struggling and has not reached that final stage yet.]

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