[Editor’s Note: This incredible story that just came to me this week is true and fascinating to read.  Note her prayer request at the end, and please uphold her and others who work in Papua New Guinea.]

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I watched in dismay as two pairs of legs came sliding over the edge of the truck’s canvas roof, over the handrail and into the truck that was moving along at a very fast speed.  Soon, two men were sitting where I and another missionary friend of mine had been holding the handrails and watching the moonlit scenery.

As I sputtered and tried to say something understandable in Tok Pisin, one of the dark shadows said in English, “Papua New Guinea – the land of the unexpected!”   I had already been feeling that my personal “space” had been violated by 28 people in the packed bed of the big truck, but now facing two unknown men, I was a bit flustered.  It wasn’t until later that I learned that it was actually illegal for the men to be riding on the top of the truck’s canvas.

As we had approached the next town, which has policemen, the illegal passengers had become legal by sitting on the handrails and sort of half-way being “inside” the truck.  As soon as we passed the town though, the illegal passengers hoisted themselves back up onto the top of the moving truck.  To me the whole thing was surreal, but Papua New Guinea is the land of the unexpected.

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We expected to leave Bunapas in the morning, but we didn’t load up until after 2:30 PM.  We expected to head immediately to Madang after a short detour.  Instead by 6 PM we were finally back on the main road heading towards Madang rather than traveling further away from Madang on the “short detour”.

We expected that since the truck was full, we would head to Madang without further stops, but even in a “full” truck, there is always room for more and more passengers. We expected to get to town on Sunday, but instead we were told that it wasn’t safe to enter Madang at night so we would spend the night at a small village on the coast and then go into town on Monday morning.

We expected to actually overnight at this small village, but instead the truck pulled off the road before it got there and went further and further down stranger and stranger tracks through a sago patch until we came out at a little shelter right on the ocean.

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If I hadn’t been so tired when we arrived after midnight, I probably would have enjoyed the moonlit ocean and the sound of the waves. We expected to sleep, but there wasn’t space for me to lie down until about 2 AM or so when enough people had left the truck that I could claim the entire truck tire (I had been sitting on the edge of the tire for most of the trip) and curl up on it with my head on one of my bags.

We expected to leave as soon as the sun rose, but it took a while and then we stopped to buy 5 liters of diesel because they were almost totally out of fuel.  We finally made it to the office at about 7:30 AM. I expected that God would take care of us and keep us safe.  In that and that alone, I was not disappointed.

God had taken care of us on a very good, relatively short trip by van out to Bunapas, protected us as we traveled by boat to and from Tsumba and then watched over us as we traveled by a combination of riding on the back of a tractor and sometimes walking (over bridges and through the heavily rutted sections) on a long “road” to the village where we would hold a Bible training course.

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The first bridge broke as the tractor finished crossing it, but none of the other bridges broke and so when we came back we only had 30 minutes of hiking in which we and the students had to carry the packs and boxes.  Praise God for his protection and care!

We spent parts of 5 days traveling to get to and return from that village where we taught a 5 day scripture use course to 30 students from 9 different language groups.  Despite the difficulties of traveling, the trip was worth it. I had been there when we taught these same students at their first module in 2010.  Several of them at that time had said, “We can’t read these books. They aren’t in our dialect. It is too hard!”

But now at the end of their 5th module, these same students laughed when I reminded them of their remarks in 2010.  These students said that reading the book of Mark was not a problem now and they had with them 4 other epistles that had been published in their language.  They asked, “Are there any more books of the Bible available that we can read and use for preaching?” I told them that I would ask about getting reviewer’s copies of more books for them.

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The New Testament for this language group is one of several New Testaments that are almost completed among the groups that we serve here in PNG.  Please pray that God will strengthen the translation team and give them good health so that preachers in this language group can have the whole New Testament soon.

Praise God with me for a good return to PNG.  I have now bought and packed up over 500 kilograms of supplies for the rest of the year.  Together with another missionary woman and my faithful dog, we will fly by helicopter to the village on September 3rd. Please pray that we will have a safe trip, settle in quickly and be ready to start a translation session with two separate language translation teams on September 10th.

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