Weird Wiring & Medical Mishaps

One thing that Pioneer Bible Translators (PBT) is keen on is providing good training for new missionaries so that they are ready when they get to the mission field.  Sometimes we know where we are going, and sometimes we don’t know where we will end up.  But even if we think we know what to expect, the one thing I have learned as a missionary is to “expect the unexpected”.

In my last article about PBT, I shared about the vision of PBT to reach the regions of the world that have the most “Extreme Spiritual Poverty”.  (Read that article here.)  Part of the training that I was involved with last week at our annual training and recruitment week was in the area of “Language Learning and Linguistics”.  But our new PBT missionaries do not just get linguistic training for the field, they also get a number of very practical hands-on training.

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Let me share with you all here some comments from a student who took these practical courses, and then some words from a couple who help to teach these classes.  First of all, one of our new women missionaries who took these courses back in 2010 had this to say:

One of the training classes I took was Primary Health Care which teaches you how to take care of yourself when medical care is not available.  This will come in handy in the villages of Africa.  I learned that if you smell like stale beer but have not been drinking you could have bubonic plague.  If you smell like fresh baked bread, you might have enteric fever.  Some of the other case studies I did diagnosed diseases like HIV/AIDS, yellow fever, cholera and even rabies.  

We learned how to deliver babies including a breech.  Although I learned how to suture a wound you should make a quick note to self that you really don’t want me to stitch you up.  Before that great class I had taken a few others including a Bush Mechanics class.  In that class I learned to wire from solar panels through batteries and a converter to electrical outlets and a light bulb that actually lit up!  These classes were great fun and will be very useful in the near future.

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As you can see, this young woman was really preparing herself for just about anything that might happen while she will be on the mission field, from doing medical care for herself and others, to doing major renovations and repairs to any house she will be living in.  Thankfully for us, Jill was a nurse (who also took an intensive “Medical Mission” crash course), and I had had some experiences in building projects when I worked for a summer mission ministry called “Teen Missions, Intl.”

Now that we have had a word from the student, let’s hear a word from two of our trainers, a married couple who have a passion to train new missionaries.  Steve has had lots of practical handyman jobs and so he helped with the “Bush Mechanics” workshop, and Becky, who is a registered nurse, helped to teach the “Medical Missionary Intensive” course.  This is what they said after the courses were finished in 2010:

I (Steve) enjoyed helping teach the Bush Mechanics class to 13 recruits. The Bush Mechanics Course is four days in length and many skills are taught such as electrical wiring, small engine repair, designing and maintaining solar systems, making a solar oven and then experimenting with cooking in the solar ovens, lantern operation and maintenance, plumbing, soldering, and designing a bush kitchen.

I (Becky) want to thank the other two RNs and the ARNP person, plus one more volunteer who for helping us with the 9 day Primary Health Care Course (PHC) June 29 – July 7th. We had a great group of 13 students. It was fun to observe them gain confidence as they learned to give injections, role play emergencies, suture, apply splints, and become so familiar with the Village Health Manual that they could take a list of symptoms, find the probable diagnosis, and then come up with a treatment plan.

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I think that perhaps the teachers are more confident in the students, than the students are confident in themselves.  But for the most part, all of us are confident that these budding new missionaries will do well once they get over to their field of service.  I’m sure they will find themselves in some awkward and difficult spots, but with at least this minimal training, plus some help from fellow missionaries, will help them to succeed well on their first term over there.

I know that I quickly had to learn to be a plumber (with pipes of slightly different diameters), and a carpenter (working in wood that bent nails), and an electrician (yes, I have a current when I touch the ends of the bare wires and I see sparks fly.)  J  And even though Jill had her Canadian nursing license, it was illegal for her to practice direct medicine, so we did some “back door” medicine and helped as we were able to.

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So some of us PBT people do have some of these basic skills, but they are mostly for potential emergencies.  And so like our woman missionary above who went to East Africa and told a teacher of 90 students who live away from home to be at school, but also who work to take care of their daily needs, with regards to helping out she told her, “the only thing I could do for them was to share the gospel.”  Then the head mistress of the school very sweetly smiled and gently touched my arm and said “don’t you understand?  That is all we really need.”  YES!  Jesus is the answer for the world today.

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