John 4:28 – 30, 39 – 45

28 So the woman left her water jar and went away into town and said to the people, 29 “Come, see a man who told me all that I ever did. Can this be the Christ?” 30 They went out of the town and were coming to him.

39 Many Samaritans from that town believed in him because of the woman’s testimony, “He told me all that I ever did.” 40 So when the Samaritans came to him, they asked him to stay with them, and he stayed there two days. 41 And many more believed because of his word. 42 They said to the woman, “It is no longer because of what you said that we believe, for we have heard for ourselves, and we know that this is indeed the Savior of the world.”

43 After the two days he departed for Galilee. 44 (For Jesus himself had testified that a prophet has no honor in his own hometown.) 45 So when he came to Galilee, the Galileans welcomed him, having seen all that he had done in Jerusalem at the feast. For they too had gone to the feast.

                                

This is the third and final section in John chapter four that highlights the Samaritan woman, with whom Jesus had spoken.  In the earlier section of this story, Jesus had shown to the woman his omniscience by describing in detail the true nature of her relationships with multiple husbands.  That prompted the woman to consider Jesus to be a prophet.

But as Jesus and the woman talked further about the true nature of worshipping God, an even greater aspect of His nature became clear to the woman.  In her desire to worship the true God, the woman mentioned the promise of God that an anointed man, the Messiah, would be sent by God to teach all people about God.  Jesus responded by saying basically, “I am that Man.”  (Read the earlier article here.)

    

Now recall how this woman had come to the well in the heat of the day to draw water.  (We drew attention in the first article to the idea that this suggests that she was an outcast from the nearby town since the practice would have been for the ladies of the town to go together in the cool of the morning to draw water.)  But now in the excitement of the moment, this woman dropped her jar and ran back to town to testify to the town’s folk that just perhaps she had met the promised Messiah, the Christ who would come to lead God’s people.

If we are seeing this event as it really happened, that was quite a bold move by that woman.  If she had been a social outcast, having been married to five men, and now living with a sixth man, then it would be highly doubtful that the town’s folk would stop to listen to anything this woman had to say.  But she was so excited and so hopeful and so insistent on what she had experienced, that the people really had to come out to meet Jesus and find out for themselves.

    

In fact, this woman’s testimony concerning the nature of who Jesus was and what He had done was so powerful that it says, “Many Samaritans from that town believed in him…”  That is a pretty strong testimony, wouldn’t you say?  So the people ask Jesus to stay with them a few more days, and as they too came to see the real Jesus, they too put their trust in Him as God’s anointed Messiah, the “Savior of the world.”

This would be a good spot for us all to stop and reflect on our own faith in Jesus.  Especially for those of us who have believed in Jesus for many years.  Do we still have the desire to tell others about Jesus with great excitement and energy?  Did we have that kind of excitement when we first accepted Jesus into our lives?  Perhaps we need to reflect a bit more on the amazing freedom and salvation from sin that Jesus gave to us when we stepped out of darkness and into His light.

    

Our passage goes on, and we see Jesus is ready to leave the Province of Samaria.  But I wonder if He did it with a bit of a heavy heart.  No one is quite sure what John meant when he wrote in verse 44, “Jesus himself had testified that a prophet has no honor in his own hometown”.  This clause is being used differently than how Matthew, Mark and Luke used it, when Jesus was not accepted in his home town of Nazareth.

It is possible that Jesus was thinking of how his own people in general, the Jews, were not very receptive to Him, which stands in strong contrast with how the Samaritans believed in Him.  Or it might refer to Jerusalem where He had just come from.  And how awfully sad it is that the Holy City, where the Temple of the Living God stood, was the very place that Jesus, the Son of God was most rejected.

    

And yet, there was still an openness and acceptance that Jesus found among the Galileans.  Perhaps it really is true that God can be found better by those who live more simple and down-to-earth lives.  It seems to me that the hustle and bustle of the “big cities”, and also the highly institutionalized religious centers, are not the places where the lowly and humble Jesus can be found.

And what about you my friend?  Has the busyness and distractions of life, and even “religion”, kept you away from having a deep personal talk with the Lord, such as this Samaritan woman had?  Open your eyes, and your heart, and let the testimony of this changed woman also help change your life.

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