Jesus’ First Miracle in Cana

John 2:1 – 12

2 1 On the third day there was a wedding at Cana in Galilee, and the mother of Jesus was there. 2 Jesus also was invited to the wedding with his disciples. 3 When the wine ran out, the mother of Jesus said to him, “They have no wine.” 4 And Jesus said to her, “Woman, what does this have to do with me? My hour has not yet come.” 5 His mother said to the servants, “Do whatever he tells you.”

6 Now there were six stone water jars there for the Jewish rites of purification, each holding twenty or thirty gallons. 7 Jesus said to the servants, “Fill the jars with water.” And they filled them up to the brim. 8 And he said to them, “Now draw some out and take it to the master of the feast.” So they took it.

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9 When the master of the feast tasted the water now become wine, and did not know where it came from (though the servants who had drawn the water knew), the master of the feast called the bridegroom 10 and said to him, “Everyone serves the good wine first, and when people have drunk freely, then the poor wine. But you have kept the good wine until now.” 11 This, the first of his signs, Jesus did at Cana in Galilee, and manifested his glory. And his disciples believed in him.

12 After this he went down to Capernaum, with his mother and his brothers and his disciples, and they stayed there for a few days.

This event in the life of Jesus is well known by both Christians and some non-Christians.  If a general survey were to be done, and people were asked, “What was the first miracle that Jesus performed?” many people would say, “Wasn’t that when Jesus turned water into wine?”  And they would be right.  But I’m not sure that many people catch the importance of what happened that day.

On that day in question, it may appear that Jesus is just caught up in the middle of the story, and then when his hand is forced, Jesus performed a great “parlour trick” as some might say, and the party went on.  But as I look at all of the participants in this story, it seems to me that while many of them think they are in control of the situation, in fact, it is only Jesus who is truly in control.  Let me explain.

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First of all, you have the bridegroom, and this ought to be his day.  After all, he is the one who just got married and he would have been the one to invite all the guests.  It would appear that Jesus’ mother was an invited guest.  But did the bridegroom invite Jesus and his disciples?  Or was that arranged by his mother, who was probably a close friend of the family.  Jesus seems somehow to be “tacked on” to the guest list.

Then you have the Master of the Feast, whose job it was to make sure that everything went smoothly at the banquet feast after the wedding.  Everything was going so well, until the water which had been turned into excellent wine showed up.  He became upset with the bridegroom for apparently hiding the best wine until the end instead of offering it first to his guests.

And then there is Jesus’ mother.  We have to wonder a bit about her motives in all this.  Scripture says that from the day Jesus was born, Mary treasured in her heart all the prophetic messages that had been spoken about her son.  She knew that Jesus was meant for greatness.  But was it right for her to push Jesus forward at the wedding to show his hand of power in front of all her friends?

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In spite of all the people who were trying to take charge that day, Jesus remained calm.  I believe He knew all along what He would do.  His words to His mother may appear strange, “My hour has not yet come,” when He turns right around and performed the miracle.  I think this was a chastisement to His mother to remind her that Jesus’ ministry was to be of His own choosing, as directed by God.

Now notice the other two participant groups mentioned in the story.  When the servants offered the water turned into wine to the Master of the Feast, they knew full well that they had put water in the large jugs.  They had just witnessed about 150 gallons of water miraculously turn into wine.  When they went home later, don’t you think that they would have shared this story with others?

And Jesus’ disciples were there too.  They may not have been with Jesus very long by this point, perhaps only a few weeks or months.  But they knew enough about Jesus that when He performed His miracle, they were ready to put their full trust and belief in Him that He was the promised Messiah sent by God (even if they didn’t understand all the implications of that yet.)

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So who was really in control on that day?  It wasn’t the bridegroom, the Master of the Feast, or Jesus’ mother.  Jesus was in control of everything that was happening.  And He was laying the foundation in the lives of ordinary people (the banquet servants and His disciples) to demonstrate that his powerful actions more than matched His powerful words, such as, “Repent, for the Kingdom of Heaven has come near.”  (See Matthew 4:17 and Mark 1:15)

And so I ask those who are reading this article: Are you still trying to be “in control” of all of your life?  Consider Jesus, who is the true and loving Master, and let Him be in control of your life and see what amazing things He just might have planned for you that you never would have dreamed of.

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