“GOD’S STORY, your story” – Pt 1

It has not been too long since we all enjoyed celebrating Christmas.  For many people, Christmas is a time of presents, good food and visiting with family members and relatives.  For Christians, we too enjoy all of these wonderful things, but we also celebrate Christmas as the time we remember when God came down and entered the world of men as a little baby boy in Bethlehem.

When we go to church during the Christmas season, we often wonder what new perspective the preacher may present in his “Christmas Message”.  We look forward to new musical arrangements and choir presentations at this time of year.  But one thing that we hardly ever get tired of is seeing the children of the church present once again the Christmas Story.

 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

In Max Lucado’s new book, “GOD’S STORY, your story”, he opens Chapter One with a wonderful description of the joy we all experience as we watch the children in their bathrobes and angel outfits tell us the story about the birth of Jesus.  But it is not just because the kids are so cute that we remain captivated by the same story we have seen year after year.

Lucado puts it this way:

They love the song, the kids, and they cherish the story.  But most of all, they cling to the hope.  The Christmas hope that God indwells the everydayness of our world.    (page 31)

When we watch the Christmas play, part of us will always be astounded by the fact that when God entered the world as a human, He did not do it with a grand fanfare.  In fact, that goes against our very nature of wanting to be recognized and to think that we are important.  And so we think, “If God was going to make an entrance, wouldn’t He do it in such a way that people would have to recognize who He was, and then be treated accordingly, like royalty?”

 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

But that is the very point I believe that God wanted to make by allowing Jesus to enter into humanity in such a humble way.  Jesus was born of a simple town girl in a smelly old barn and first greeted by lowly sheep herders to emphasize that Jesus is one of us.  He put aside His claims to royalty and lived a pretty ordinary life until He began His public ministry at the age of thirty.

What this means for the majority of us who live such common, ordinary lives, is that Jesus can understand us well and what we deal with in life, because that is the same kind of world that He grew up in – ordinary.  Lucado puts our hearts’ cry into these words:

Had Jesus come with such whoop-de-do, we world have read the story and thought, “My, look how Jesus entered their world.”  But since he didn’t, we can read the story and dream: “My, might Jesus be born in my world?  My everyday world?”     (page 33)

 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

Consider for a minute what greatness Jesus had before He became a human.  In Colossians 1:15 – 17 it says:

He is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation.  For by him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things were created by him and for him.  He is before all things, and in him all things hold together.

In the opening words of the Gospel of John, it tells us that not only was Jesus with God, but He is God.  WOW!!  And yet He left all that to live as the son of a carpenter.  Then when He was 30 years old, He walked the dusty roads all over Palestine, hung out with outcasts and known sinners, and taught twelve of the most unlikely candidates to be His successors and the foundation of the early church.

It shames me to think that Jesus was willing to go to these lengths to share the Good News about the love of God and then to lay down his life by dying on a cross in order to make the way open for people to come back to God.  First He gave up Heaven to live among us, and then He gave up His life to save us from our sin.

 ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

This makes me think back over all the years that I have been active in ministry myself, either as a pastor in North America, or a missionary overseas.  I do believe that I was serving the Lord out of an honest desire to help others know God and come to Him.  But I also know that my motives have not always been pure.  There have been many times when I was seeking to be noticed and to get the approval of men.

I remember what one pastor with whom I worked as an intern said to me, “What is it you are trying to prove?”   He was right.  I was not satisfied with just doing what God was asking me to do.  I wanted others to notice me.  What I forget many times is that God is not so concerns with our abilities as He is with our availability to serve Him.

In these past few years I have become much more content to simply be used by God and let Him be the one to get the glory.  Consider what Mary said when the angel announced to her that she would give birth to the Son of God.  She simply said, “I am the Lord’s servant.”  May we all be like her, and certainly like Jesus.  It is God’s domain to do the extraordinary.  That allows us to be ordinary, and still see great things be done in and through our lives by the power and the grace of the Almighty God.

[God’s Story, Your Story] Max Lucado.  Copyright [Thomas Nelson Publishers, 2011]  Used by permission.

Advertisements