God And Me Through The Years

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The Plinky Question for this week is:
“Write one thought or sentence that summarizes each year of your life.”

This idea for an aricle caught my attention. I am now 50 years old, which seems to me to be a good place at which I could look back and survey the years that I’ve lived. I think this could be quite interesting, so let’s have a go at this and see what we come up with. What I will try to do is summarize my life in five-year blocks. I hope you also find this interesting.

Infancy

  • 1960: “It’s a boy!”  (Norman Craig Weatherhead enters the world.)
  • 1961:  Not much to say. (But wait until I become a linguist.)
  • 1962: “Guess what Mom? I can sink.”  (The day a lifeguard rescued me.)
  • 1963:  Little boys and puppy dog tails.  (The question was, who was chasing whom?)
  • 1964:  Droopy drawers and hanging out doors.  (Ask my mom about that one.)
  • 1965:  An early perfectionist.  (20 minutes to cut out the picture in kindergarten.)

Childhood

  • 1966: “I love reading!”  (Me, my Mom, and the Principal. Read the story here.)
  • 1967:  Canada becomes independent. (I rolled my centennial penny all the way home.)
  • 1968:  Sent home with a note.  (“You can’t tackle girls outside school and kiss them?”)
  • 1969:  Standing in the corner.  (“You mean I can’t speak out in class when I want to?”)
  • 1970:  Chased by bullies.  (Aha, that’s why I became a long-distance runner.)

Early Teen Years

  • 1971:  Grade Sixers Rule!  (It’s nice to start the school year at the top of the school.)
  • 1972:  God becomes real. (Read here how God first touched my life.)
  • 1973:  Born-again.  (I commit my life to Christ and am baptized.)
  • 1974:  Special leaders.  (Thank God for Youth Group leaders who cared about me.)
  • 1975:  Love for math.  (Doing 10th grade algebra in my 9th grade math class.)

Later Teen Years

  • 1976:  Love for running.  (All the way to Calgary city finals in the 800 m race.)
  • 1977:  Jesus and me in the Navy. (Read about my faith under fire in this story.)
  • 1978:  A high school grad.  (With honors and scholarships to boot.)
  • 1979:  Up the Amazon.  (My first short term mission with Teen Missions Intl.)
  • 1980:  Full-time missionary.  (18 wonderful/challenging months with Teen Missions.)

Young Adult

  • 1981:  Bible college begins.  (Alberta Bible College – what a great school!)
  • 1982:  Learning pastoral ministry. (Youth group leader and church intern. Crazy!!)
  • 1983:  The famous “Sandwich”.  (How I started dating Jill.  I even made the bread.)
  • 1984:  I graduate, Grandma dies, Jill and I get married.  (What a week!)
  • 1985:  Seminary in subzero.  (Canadian Theological Seminary in Saskatchewan.)

Early Married Years

  • 1986:  Summer missions with Jill.  (Last year Dominican Republic, now Mexico.)
  • 1987:  Celebrate with Jill. (Jill gets her nursing diploma and sings on stage.)
  • 1988:  Church  planter?  (A valiant effort, but a “dry well” in Texas.)
  • 1989:  Our bundle of joy.  (Eric is born. Bring on those diapers!)
  • 1990:  Pain in the offering.  (Not wanted at a church.)

Finding Direction

  • 1991: “Is he the father?”  (Glen is born – 9 lbs. 14 oz. and 23 3/4 inches long.)
  • 1992:  Ministry in the Prairies. (God uses a city boy in a country church.)
  • 1993:  God humbles me.  (Read the full story here.)
  • 1994:  Love for biblical languages.  (Hooray for Lincoln Christian Seminary.)
  • 1995:  Training to be a Bible translator.  (Studying linguistics in Dallas.)

Translation Years

  • 1996:  Churches support our ministry.  (Getting ready and set to go to the field.)
  • 1997: “But it’s not the swamps!”  (We moved to a small village in PNG.)
  • 1998:  An official alphabet.  (The first thing published in the Nend language.)
  • 1999:  Death in the family.  (My father dies; we visit family and supporting churches.)
  • 2000: Hard at work.  (Translation on the Gospel of Mark goes forward.)

Difficult Years

  • 2001:  Bible school in the Bush.  (Teaching Genesis to Revelation in the village.)
  • 2002:  The Diagnosis. (Eric has leukemia and we return to Canada.)
  • 2003:  Chemotherapy and photo ops.  (Eric chosen as cancer’s Spokes Kid.)
  • 2004:  A good year.  (Teaching at Western Christian College.)
  • 2005:  Management training.  (Preparing to serve in East Africa.)

Transition Years

  • 2006:  Family choices.  (Eric returns to Canada for Gr. 12; three of us stay in Africa.)
  • 2007:  Back to Canada. (We help the boys with college and getting ready for life.)
  • 2008:  Another diagnosis!  (A muscle disease hits Norm and walking gets tough.)
  • 2009:  Slowly and carefully.  (Jill and I take one short mission trip to PNG.)
  • 2010:  Finding solutions.  (Wheelchairs, walkers, and recliners allow me to do work.)
  • 2011:  A step of faith.  (Norm lives in Dallas for 4 months doing translation work.)

And so there you have it folks, my entire life in one page. I found it quite interesting to think back over all the years and consider what the highlights were for each of those years. As you can see, God or ministry work (either in North America or in overseas countries) was a big part of many of these years. Of course there have been some discouraging times and difficult times. But for the most part, I can just about say that I found something positive in each and every year.

Well, I hope that you enjoyed this overview of my life. Perhaps you may find doing something like this, writing out the summary of your life year-by-year, may turn out to be just as interesting and valuable to you as it was to me doing my own life history. In some ways, I think it comes down to our basic outlook and attitude in life. For me, I try to live by these words: “Giving honor and glory to God in all that I do.”

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God’s Little Detours – Part 2

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The Value Of Detours

This is the second article that I want to talk about this concept of encountering detours in life.  And let’s face it, the question is not whether we will encounter detours, but what to do when we encounter detours.  In the last article, I mentioned that we will all have good moments, and that we must treasure those moments and count them as blessings. And now I would like to suggest that we even consider the detours of our lives to be blessings and to treasure them also.

This is exactly the kind of attitude that I sensed as I read the second half of chapter 9 of Mark Atteberry’s book entitled, “Walking With God on the Road You Never Wanted to Travel”.  For those who have been reading these “Hard Road Journey” articles, I would like to suggest again that this book is certainly one worth getting and reading many times.  (You can click here to find out how I can help you to get this book.)

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Let’s look then at how Atteberry considers detours in life to be helpful:

1.  Detours Can Train You

One of the first things that Atteberry does in this part of the chapter is to make a distinction between “to teach” and “to train”.  I thought that this was quite good because there is an important difference between the two concepts. You can hear about something, watch something, and even study something, and that might “teach” you something important. But until you have gone through an experience, you have not really been “trained” to be able to handle that experience.

I shared with many people of the strong interest that I had in Bible translation work since the time that I was age 16.  Then, when I tell them that I was 36 years old when our family went over to Papua New Guinea to start working in a translation project, people often ask the obvious question, “So what did you do in those 20 years?”

And I will respond, “Let’s see, I did some short-term mission work in Central and South America. I went to Bible school, then got married, then carried on and went to seminary. After that, I did about five years of pastoral ministry. Then there were some in between years where I felt a little lost and God was teaching me some lessons in humility. And also, we started a family and began raising our two boys.”

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I think it’s fair to say that when it comes to ministry work, and especially Bible translation work, I can be very passionate about it. Almost to the point that you could say I become so absorbed or obsessed with it that I can lose perspective with regards to other people or other important things in life. But I would never say that those 20 years between the time that I first thought about being a Bible translator until when I finally got onto the field were wasted years.

This came home to me in a powerful way in 2007. I was in PNG and attending a course to train translators to become Bible translation consultants. We were trained to listen well, ask good questions, be patient, be sensitive to cultural issues, know how to exegete Scriptures well, offer suggestions but not be forceful about it, and much more.

By the third week of this course we had had opportunities to sit in and watch experienced consultants work with other missionaries and the national speakers to check their translations. We were also given opportunity to lead sessions ourselves. When the teacher of this course asked me one day how it was going for me, my reply was, “Everything in my life up to this point now make sense to me.” And I still believe that is true: my theological training plus my years of pastoral ministry plus my village experience as a translator had honed me to be able to be a good translation consultant.

2.  Detours Can Test You.

But just when I thought that everything was now in place for me to be traveling the world as a Bible translation consultant and trainer, that was when my muscle disease hit me and its symptoms flared up. In February of 2008, I had just returned from PNG after doing six weeks of intense consultant sessions and some training sessions. I literally went from running through airports to barely being able to walk across my own living room floor.

As my health deteriorated that year, I slowly released one responsibility after another of the many international tasks that Pioneer Bible Translators had asked me to be involved in. By the spring of 2009, I was hardly doing anything at all, except feeling sorry for myself. And I felt like my ministry work and even my life was coming to an end.

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Praise the Lord, God showed me that there were still many things that I could do and that if I leaned on him and trusted him for my daily strength, He would empower me to continue to do this translation consultant work. What I’ve come to realize is that while there may be many things that I would like to do, I am to focus in on this one thing that I can do and which God still wants me to do.

Many people who are aware of my muscle condition have commented to me how amazing it is that I am still able to do this work. I could let this go to my head, but instead, I point to God and say it is by God’s grace and grace alone that this is possible. I will close this article was a very good quote from Atteberry on page 124:

Make up your mind that you’re willing to learn whatever the experience is ready to teach you. And remember that your character is being put to the test. People are watching and will be influenced for better or worse by what you say and do.

Faith Is Rewarded

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What Is Faith – Part 3

During the past couple of weeks, I have been listening to a sermon series on “Faith”.  My plan for the article for today was to continue writing out my thoughts and summaries of what I was learning from this sermon series.  But something incredible happened this week that I just have to share with all of you. It is a story about how pure and persistent faith can overcome the obstacles that stand in our way.

This story concerns my younger son Glen, and is the answer to prayers that we have been praying for many, many months. In a previous article ( which you can read here), I wrote about this strong desire that my son has had to be able to join the Canadian military, specifically the Army. And finally, two days ago, Glen found out that he had in fact been selected and will head off to Boot Camp as soon as they phone him and tell him what those dates are.

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To appreciate the magnitude of how great an answer to prayer this is, I will need to go back and give you a lot of the background details that led up to this moment. It was while our family was working in Africa in 2006 and ’07 that our son first entertained the idea seriously about joining the military. When we came back from Africa, and while Glen was doing his last year of high school, he was involved with the Army reserves.

He found that fascinating and really enjoyed those weekends when they would go out on squad exercises, but it was too difficult to manage schooling and involvement with the military at the same time. So he put the idea of the Army to the side, finished high school, and then went on and completed a year of Bible college.

As soon as he finished that one year certificate though, he went down and immediately applied to join the Regular Forces of the Army. There was the normal bureaucratic hoops and paper trails during that summer of 09, but by September, Glen was offered the opportunity to join at that time. And he knew that this was what he wanted, but part of him felt that he was not quite ready and so he passed up that invitation.

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One year later, our son was not only a year older, but just a little bit more ready to enter into the world of the military. He was told that he needed to start his application again, and all of us were quite surprised to find that there was a job freeze on the military and that he would be put on a waiting list. This began the long road and test of faith for all of us.

Now I want to pick up the story from my perspective as a father. When Glen first started talking about joining the military, as a parent I naturally felt very concerned and worried for him. After having many talks with him, and after much thought and prayer, I arrived at the place where I felt okay about his desire. In fact, there came a day that God not only gave me peace about this decision, but also a conviction and assurance that this was the right thing for Glen to do.

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Over this past winter and spring, all of us in the family were actively praying that God would open up the door again for our son to be accepted back into the military. And every time that I talked with Glen, both of us felt that we needed to believe that it would happen, even though it seemed like all the odds were against it happening.

It seemed like every time that Glen would phone the military, he would get different answers as to whether there were positions available are not. Then about two months ago, we got our hopes up when Glen was called in for an interview (which went well) and he also passed the medical exam. But weeks went by and there was no news.

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Finally, it looked like a breakthrough when a few weeks ago he was told that he was on the “Merit List”. The next thing we heard was that there were 80 applicants for the remaining 20 positions. What an emotional roller coaster we were all on, but again, we stubbornly chose by faith to believe that God would open the door and allow Glen to be selected.

Then I remembered something that I had just heard and written about in last week’s article on faith. The speaker, Leon Fontaine, presented the idea that there are obstacles (i.e. mountains) in our lives, and that by faith we should speak, literally speak against these mountains to be removed. Again, this is not the idea of using words like magical incantations. But rather, it is a bold proclamation coming out from within of the faith that you hold to be true.

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And so, when they told us last week that this Tuesday was going to be the final day of selection, I felt empowered and emboldened within my spirit to lay claim to the biblical promise of Psalm 37:4, “Delight in the Lord, and He will give you the desires of your heart.” I knew that Glen had committed his ways to the Lord, and I also knew that God had given me in the past the peace and the conviction that Glen should join the military.

Throughout the morning of Tuesday then, I not only prayed to God, but I prayed out loud to God to let this be the day that Glen would be accepted. What a great relief and joy I felt then, when Glen phoned at two o’clock in the afternoon to let me know that yes indeed, he had been one of the 20 who were selected to be accepted.

All I can say now is, “Thank you, thank you God!”  Just like the parable of the persistent widow, You showed us once again that when we have persistent faith in You, faith is rewarded.

Transforming Lives With God’s Word

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What is Pioneer Bible Translators?

I have mentioned the name of Pioneer Bible Translators many times in my articles, the mission agency that I am a member of, but I have not given much background on it.  So I thought I would share something that our current President, Greg Pruett, said in one of his articles.  He sums up some of the primary distinctions of our mission and what we hope to achieve through prayer and the power of God.

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Greg wrote this a year ago, and sets the backdrop of what PBT is all about by starting with this story:

The passion in his eyes drew my full attention. I could tell from the sheer concentration on my friend’s face that he was about to make a once-in-a-lifetime statement: “I can’t imagine any way to explain how grateful I am. For as long as I live, I will never be able to tell you the thanks I have in my heart for this New Testament in my own language.

Sometimes I think about it at night. I used to read the Bible in English or in French, and I could understand a little bit, but now when I read this New Testament, the meaning just comes right into my mind.” Pioneer Bible Translators’ ultimate aim, our vision, is to strive together with our partners for the day when God’s Word will be transforming lives in every language on earth.

Greg then goes on to share the core values of PBT:

The Need

Every person on earth has the right to a Bible that he or she can understand. Jesus said that people cannot truly live except by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God. Yet 350 million people —speaking more than 2,200 languages—are completely Bible-less, without access to even one portion of Scripture. Another one billion people do not yet have a New Testament available in the language they understand best. How long will they wait to encounter the story of God’s love for them?

Our Roots

Pioneer Bible Translators started discipling the Bible-less in 1976. With our roots in the Restoration Movement, PBT is committed to practicing unity in the body of Christ with Scripture as the sole authority. We promote the restoration of the unity of the Church by mobilizing Christians to work together on the basis of obeying the clearly taught, essential elements of Scripture while allowing for a wide diversity of opinion on matters that Scripture does not make clear.

We seek to mobilize believers who are able to unite around reading and obeying the Bible and making it accessible to people who do not have it. Today, Pioneer Bible Translators bridges the gap between the Church and Bibleless peoples, translating the Word into the heart languages of unreached people to transform lives and grow thriving New Testament churches.

Our Strategy

Pioneer Bible Translators…
• Disciples the Bible-less peoples
• Mobilizes God’s people everywhere
• Provides enduring access to God’s Word
• Maximizes the impact of Scripture to grow the Church

We give our utmost to fulfill the Great Commission through the power of the translated Word of God.

We aspire to help people without God’s Word impact their context with Scripture, equipping them to translate it into their language and use it to transform their community. We consider our ministry among a people complete when a network of churches is using Scripture to grow and multiply. We put together whatever team is needed to help a language group go from Bible-less to Bible impact.

We Send…
• Translators where there is no Scripture.
• Church planters where there is no church to use the Scripture.
• Literacy workers where the people cannot read.
• Community development specialists where the people are closed to Scripture in order to show Christ’s love.
• Skilled support specialists —teachers, builders, administrators and more—to accelerate the mission.

Our Future

If the momentum of the Bible Translation movement continues to build as it has for the last 30 years, then over the next two decades we and our partners will start all the translation projects needed in the world. By 2050, we could live in a world where the New Testament has been translated into every viable language. We are now recruiting and training the generation of missionaries that could leave behind them a world in which the New Testament exists in every language!

If Jesus doesn’t return before then, they will tell their grandchildren, “Kids, it wasn’t always like it is today. There was a time when not everyone could have the Bible in their language.” We in PBT are giving our lives to leave that legacy. But it’s not enough to crank out Scripture—we want the Bible to transform lives.

That’s why we are now planning for our future by asking the question, “What does PBT need to become—what do we need to bring to the Bible translation movement—to see a network of churches using Scripture to grow and multiply in every language group on earth in the coming decades?” If this generation rises to the challenge, the goal is within our reach! God has placed it within our reach.

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These are exciting days for sure.  I have been part of PBT for 16 years now, and I have seen it grow from a small mission with two offices rooms and about 100 missionaries working in primarily three regions of the world, to a mission that is based out of two building (one just brand new), and has over 300 missionaries working in countries all over the world.

How could such a transformation happen?  Only by the grace of God and the power of prayer.  And as Greg says, the purpose of our existence as a mission is not to grow the mission, but to transform the lives and hearts of individuals in every distinct culture and linguistic group of people around the world.

Stay tuned as I share much more from this point forward about Pioneer Bible Translators.  Both in my “Who Am I?” personal life journey stories, as well as current day happenings in this mission.  But in anything I write, ultimately, I want to give all the honor and glory to God who is doing these great things through us who are merely His servants.  Praise be to God.

Training To Be A Bible Translator

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Who Am I?  Part 18

At last! After many years of thinking, dreaming, and praying about the idea of me becoming a Bible translator, the time was now at hand. At least, it was the beginning of the beginning. We had just finished living in Lincoln, Illinois for a year, and then we made the move down to Dallas, Texas. This was where I was going to do the linguistic studies that I would need to be able to become an effective Bible translator.

It was in 1976, that I saw firsthand what Bible translation was all about, when I visited the missionary couple who were living in the mountains of Peru. I was fascinated with the idea that you could learn the local language used by the people and then translate the Bible into that language. Now, 17 years later, I was finally going to start to pursue this dream of becoming a translator myself.

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My life became very busy that fall of ’94 and winter of ’95 as I dug into courses like Phonetics, Phonology, Grammar, Language Acquisition, Culture and Society, Field Works ( where we learn to use computer programs to help us analyze language data), and many others. And life was certainly hectic for Jill too as she also took some of the foundational linguistic courses, helped to take care of the boys, and also worked at a nearby hospital.

While we were there, our family lived in a dormitory building where many other linguistics students were staying as well as a few families. In many ways we shared our lives together as we studied together, lived in the dorm together, and also ate meals together in the cafeteria up the hill. It was an exciting time as most of us were here training to become missionaries and be involved in some capacity in actual translation projects, or in support roles to help those who are doing translation.

Besides concentrating on the studies, one of the most important questions that we needed to answer for ourselves was where we wanted to go in the world. At that time, Pioneer Bible Translators was working primarily in three countries or regions of the world. They had a Branch in West Africa, East Africa and Papua New Guinea. They also had a small project starting in the Ukraine.

In a funny kind of way, the choice was very simple for me. In the ’80s, there was a popular Christian song sung by Scott Wesley Brown called, “Please Don’t Send Me To Africa”. It’s a song that pokes fun at Christians who are afraid that God will call them to be a missionary and the idea is that people will say, “Please Lord, I will do anything, but please, please do not send me to Africa.”

You will find out later that our family actually did go to Africa, but in the ’80s and ’90s, I had a strong pull of wanting to go to the Pacific Islands region of the world. I also felt old, considering that most of the students were in their 20s and I was now in my mid 30s, so I wanted to go to a well established Branch, and it also appealed to me to consider working in a project that had already been started.

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I believe that it was God’s providential guidance that Jill and I were able to become acquainted with a couple from PBT that had worked in a translation project in PNG, but for health reasons were back in America. We visited and e-mailed each other many times over the two-year period before we actually got to PNG. Even more amazing, was that this man had produced a grammar of the people group that he had worked with and I was able to use that as part of a research project in one of my graduate study courses.

After taking the fall and winter courses of linguistics in Dallas, our family traveled to North Dakota where some summer linguistic courses were offered. That was very intense since these advanced courses, which were usually taught over 14 weeks in Dallas, were taught in only eight weeks. We spent the Fall in Calgary before returning to Dallas, to finish my last semester of my linguistic training.

So finally, after a year and a half of studies, our family was prepared to leave North America and travel to PNG to live among the people of a remote area and learn their language and translate the Bible into that language. There was just one little detail that needed to be taken care of though. We would need to raise missionary support for us to be able to live and work over there in PNG.

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In some ways, this was much more challenging to us emotionally and spiritually as we realized that we would need to depend on God and God’s people to raise up the monies that we would need. As much as we were able to, during ’94 and ’95, we visited or wrote to many Canadian churches and we were excited every time one of these churches responded back positively to say they would support us as best they were able to at that time.

Then, God opened the door for us to return to Illinois. Jill was able to work at the hospital, and through prayer and the leading of God’s Spirit, we were able to visit about 28 churches throughout Illinois to tell them of our plans to be missionaries in PNG. How God led us to be able to speak in all these churches is another story in and of itself, but we were truly humbled and amazed to see so many places open their doors to receive us and to listen to our plans to serve God.

By the end of 1996, everything was pretty much in place. The training was done, partnerships with churches and individuals had been established, and we were ready to go. All we had to do now, was get the entry visas stamped in our passports and we would be on our way to PNG. But that little story, will be the beginning of the next article.

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The Facts About Faith

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What Is Faith – Part 2

This is the second article in this miniseries that I want to write on the topic of faith.  In the first article, “Faith Comes by Hearing“, we learned that faith is something that we can actually get.  And this comes, or begins, at the moment when we first hear the Good News about Christ, and accept that message as being true and we put our faith, or trust, in Christ.

What we are declaring is that everything that is said about this man Jesus is true, and that all the things that He has said are also true.  But there is one fallacy that I would like to correct that is in the minds of some people, namely that faith (or belief) is something that was important in the past, and will one day be rewarded in the future (namely our acceptance by God into Heaven), and have very little connection to our daily lives today.

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You see, true faith is not just a decision made in the past, nor is it just a spiritual reality that only relates to our future in Heaven.  Rather, faith is a journey to be traveled, and it is based upon a relationship with God, and is to be lived out in our daily lives..  Romans 1:17 says it well as Paul wrote, “The righteous shall live by faith.”

As we go through life and encounter all kinds of difficult situations, we must believe that God will work things out positively for us, or He will provide the resources (or the means) to be able to walk through those difficult periods in our lives.  Otherwise, all of the numerous promises found within Scripture (such as God being our Provider, our Healer, our Comforter, etc) get reduced to just figurative speech and are of little value to us right now.

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In listening to one of the sermons from Leon Fontaine on this topic of faith, he tells us that as Christians, we all have faith within us.  We do not need to psyche ourselves up to get or find faith, but rather, we are to actually exercise our faith.  When we accepted Christ into our lives, we were given the power of the Holy Spirit who lives within, the same power that raised Jesus from the dead.

So the question is not whether we have faith or not, but whether our faith is active or if we let it lay dormant.  Jesus showed the disciples what things can happen when we exercise this kind of faith in Mark chapter 11. This is where Jesus spoke against the fig tree that had not produced any fruit and within a day it had completely withered from the roots up.

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When the disciples responded with amazement at this miracle, Jesus told them that they too could do mighty things simply by faith. He told them that the mountains can be moved by faith. (Personally, I take this to be one place where Jesus was using hyperbole or figurative language to teach an important truth.) The message that Jesus was trying to get across was that no matter what kind of obstacle lies in our path, by faith we can overcome.

There was one more point in pastor Leon’s message that I thought was interesting. He mentioned how Jesus told his disciples that they should “speak to the mountain”.  I think there is truth to the idea that when we actually speak something aloud that there is power in those words. Not that the words themselves carry power, because that would be very similar to the idea of using magic incantations, but rather by speaking them aloud it simply reveals the faith that is there in the person’s heart.

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I can still remember an event that happened in my life that I think can illustrate the things that I have just written. In my teenage years, I struggled with hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and had to constantly be eating throughout the day to keep my sugar levels in balance. It got to the point by the time I was almost 20 that I felt like I was in bondage to food.

Due to the dangers of going into a hypoglycemic attack, which could look like I was having a seizure, I wore a medical alert bracelet on my wrist. But a very interesting thing happened while I was part of a traveling mission group. I had been studying the Bible on the topic of healing  and on one night that I was to lead the devotional time, I literally felt a surge of faith within me and I knew I was to speak these words of faith with regards to my illness.

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I turned to one of my friends in the group and I asked him to come over and take the bracelet off my wrist. When he asked me why, I told him and the group that I had a strong sense that God was going to heal me, but to actualize that faith I had to say out loud, “I’m healed! So now as an act of faith I want you to remove this bracelet.”

And guess what? Ever since that day in 1979, I’ve been free from the bondage to food and from serious hypoglycemic attacks. I still to this day believe that it was because I was walking in a daily relationship with God that I sensed him telling me that I was healed, and that when I spoke to my “mountain” that my faith was fully realized and actualized in my life. My faith relationship with God at that moment expanded beyond just the spiritual realm to impact me at the physical level.

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STAY  TUNED…

In a few days, I will listen to the next sermon on faith and then I will share what I’ve learned in another article. I pray that this article has been an encouragement to other Christians to speak out their faith and to see mighty things happen as well in their lives.

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