John 13:18-30

18 “I am not saying these things to all of you; I know the ones I have chosen. But this fulfills the Scripture that says, ‘The one who eats my food has turned against me.’ 19 I tell you this beforehand, so that when it happens you will believe that I Am the Messiah. 20 I tell you the truth, anyone who welcomes my messenger is welcoming me, and anyone who welcomes me is welcoming the Father who sent me.”

21 Now Jesus was deeply troubled, and he exclaimed, “I tell you the truth, one of you will betray me!” 22 The disciples looked at each other, wondering whom he could mean. 23 The disciple Jesus loved was sitting next to Jesus at the table. 24 Simon Peter motioned to him to ask, “Who’s he talking about?” 25 So that disciple leaned over to Jesus and asked, “Lord, who is it?”

26 Jesus responded, “It is the one to whom I give the bread I dip in the bowl.” And when he had dipped it, he gave it to Judas, son of Simon Iscariot. 27 When Judas had eaten the bread, Satan entered into him. Then Jesus told him, “Hurry and do what you’re going to do.” 28 None of the others at the table knew what Jesus meant. 29 Since Judas was their treasurer, some thought Jesus was telling him to go and pay for the food or to give some money to the poor. 30 So Judas left at once, going out into the night.

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The word “betrayal” is a unique word.  It implies that a person has been severely hurt by another.  It could have a physical side to this, but more often then not, it refers to being wounded relationally so that we feel “great emotional pain”.  Note this, we do not think of being betrayed by our enemies.  In fact, we actually expect to be mistreated by our enemies.

No, we feel the greatest pain when the one who has offended us is one of our family members, or one of those whom we have considered to be a close friend.  This is what makes “betrayal” such a unique and difficult word to handle.  It is our friends, not our enemies, who most possess the ability to betray us.  And in fact, the closer a person is to another, the deeper the wound will go when we feel betrayed by them.

Why is that?  Simply put, when we draw closer to a person, we reveal more of our inner soul to that person, and thereby entrust more of our heart to that person.  So when someone betrays that trust, it feels like a knife has pierced our heart and we become deeply wounded in our soul.

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This is what happened to Jesus the night that he was betrayed, the night before his death on the cross.  For over three years, Jesus had entrusted himself to twelve men.  He taught them all deep spiritual truths, he demonstrated his love and his power to them many times, and he shared a number of intimate moments with them.  These men were Jesus’ true brothers in this world.

But from our passage above, we know that one man, Judas, was willing to sell out this friendship.  In Matthew’s gospel, we are told that Judas was willing to betray Jesus for merely 30 pieces of silver money.  Surely that small amount of money could not come close to being the worth of a man, and especially the man Jesus, who came from God, and is God.

But Scripture tells us in John 13:2 that Satan has already persuaded Judas to hand over Jesus to his enemies.  One version says “Satan enticed him…” showing that the attraction to money was greater than his sense of loyalty to a friend.  The terrible deed began as a thought, and was realized through action as Judas left the meal to bring back Jesus’ enemies.

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What amazes me as I read this passage is that Jesus is fully aware of what is happening.  He even seems to be encouraging Judas to go and do his terrible deed.  And yet, Jesus is not unaffected by this emotionally.  Verse 21 says that Jesus was “deeply troubled.”  Jesus’ spirit within him was in great distress over what Judas would do to him.  But I don’t think that is the only reason that Jesus was “deeply troubled”.

Verse 1 of this chapter says, “Now he showed his disciples the full extent of this love.”  Even while knowing that Judas would betray him, Jesus had love for him.  Wow!!  Could we ever be able to follow after Jesus’ example?  I know what my first reaction would be toward someone who had betrayed me.  I would not only feel angry, but I would want that other person to suffer for what he or she had done to me.

But that is not the way that Jesus handled his own betrayal by Judas.  No one but Jesus really knew what was going on that night.  But rather than respond out of anger or revenge, Jesus deeply felt and demonstrated his servant-love to all his disciples, including the one who would betray him.

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So what can we take away from this passage?  We all need to distinguish the difference between the acts that someone does against us or against God, and look toward the one who has committed the sin and still love that person.  As long as there are people around us, we will be vulnerable to being hurt, even betrayed at times.  But Jesus tells us to love one another, and even be willing to die for another, in order to forgive the sin, and save the sinner.  Can you do that?

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